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H&R Revolver

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by captdreifus, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. captdreifus

    captdreifus aSun666

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    I just inherited a H&R .32 revolver. Can anyone tell me about this gun? Thanks, any help would be appreciated. I'll post pics later.

    capt

    ETA: Pics

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2010
  2. Bill Keith

    Bill Keith

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    The original H&R is out of business. Marlin bought the rights to use the name for some of their rifles some time ago. The company was based in Massachusetts and made fairly inexpensive revolvers from the late 1800's until about the mid 90's. The last I can remember was a pretty decent 22LR 9-shot revolver with a tip up barrel. The 32 caliber guns were generally around the early 1900's until the early 50's when that caliber was fairly often offered for personal defense. The caliber came out in 32 S&W then S&W long, and eventually morphed into the H & R 32 mag (not really too hot) because the guns couldn't handle the pressure, because of the metallurgy. Ruger has made some revolvers in that caliber (32 H&R mag for cowboy shooting) and eventually the lowly 32 caliber morphed into the pretty stout 327 Federal. Federal, Fiocchi, Winchester and Remington and some of the smaller ammo companies still make S&W & S&W long ammo. The S&W load is about 680FPS, and S&W long is usually loaded to about 700-750 FPS in 78 to about 98 grain ammo - depending on maker. Nowadays with the crazy ammo prices - a box of 50 rounds will run you about $28-$30 at a gun shop or big box store - if they carry it at all. Most likely your gun is not real old & will handle 32 S&W long ammo - don't even try using 32 ACP ammo in it, that is for the auto loaders. I'm sure it's probably safe to shoot if the action still locks up and the firing pin is OK. I'm not sure if it would be too wise to leave it hammer down on a loaded chamber. It most likely is an older gun without any kind of hammer block safety, just load one round, skip the next charge hole, then load the rest. Then thumb the hammer back and let it go down with your thumb hanging on to it so it rests on the empty chamber - just like an old Colt SAA.
    Whats it good for? Shooting! It would make a passable gun to take along on hikes or camping for small game for the cook pot, dispatching wounded critters and even personal protection if you can hit what your aiming for. It doesn't have a whole lot of 'knock down' power, but who wants to get shot with anything?! As it was inherited, I'm sure it'll have some sentimental value, and I learned long ago, never get rid of a gun unless you absolutely have to.
    That's all I can think of off the top of my head.:wavey:
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2010

  3. Berto

    Berto woo woo

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    Pretty much inexpensive but good functional shooters.
    I have the 9 shot .22 Sportsman 999, it's pretty well made and fun to shoot.
     
  4. captdreifus

    captdreifus aSun666

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    Thanks for the replies!
     
  5. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    I have a 32S&W long, S&W. I have shot some gel with it.

    IMHO, It is not cheap to shoot like 22LR. It is not powerful enough to carry or shoot competition with. It is an odd ball that I don't use for much. If I trapped, it could be great for checking traps, but so would a 22LR or even 38special.

    So keep it for sentimental value. Take it to the range AT LEAST once a year to honor and memory. And don't forget to post some pictures when you get a chance.
     
  6. bac1023

    bac1023

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    I've had this H&R 949 that I bought a few years back for cheap. Its solid and never let me down.

    Its claim to fame was being double action, but retaining the single action grip style. :dunno:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. DoubleWide

    DoubleWide

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    What model?

    Numrich had the parts for my dad's H&R 999 a year ago. I'd take a look there and pick up some of the inexpensive parts while they're around.

    .32 ain't cheap to shoot for what it is.
     
  8. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Very true.
     
  9. armybass

    armybass VCDL

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    clinging to my guns
    I have one like that...yours is prettier. Mine is a great shooter!
     
  10. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Yeah, it is a good plinker.

    Its better quality than today's inexpensive rimfire revolvers.
     
  11. captdreifus

    captdreifus aSun666

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  12. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Looks nice :)











    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2010
  13. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    It looks good.
    It looks like someone kept it in their sock drawer all the guns life.
    It just begs to be shot. :)
     
  14. OJ

    OJ Deceased Millennium Member

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    As described above, H&R had a long history and produced many near classics - here is my "BUNTLINE SPECIAL" with 12" barrel and cylinders for 22 LR and 22 Magnum. Looks and loads like single action but can be fired DA.

    [​IMG]

    However, back in the 1920-30s, H&R produced handguns chambered in 410 bore and 28 gauge smooth bore handguns with either 8" or 12 1/4" barrels with no choke. Lots of fun to shoot but, with no choke, effective range was only about 20 yards - at best. I got prairie dogs, rabbits, and occasional unwary pheasants with it.

    A friend on my dad gave me this one in 410 bore in 1933 - and the National Firearms Act was passed the next year- to restrict ownership of Thompson Submachine Guns - claiming they were first choice of bootleggers - never mind the 21st amendment abolishing prohibition passed in 1933. The ATF, in its wisdom, included this little firearm gem as a "sawed-off shotgun" requiring registration and $200 depression day dollars. The form asked why I had such "weapon" and I said I was a "gun collector" - I was nearly eight years old.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Over the years, collectors have done their best to get this gun off the NFA list and, while the BATF has reclassified it as a "Curio & Relic", and not only refuses to "delist" it but, while full auto guns can be bought & sold (expensive - but possible), if anyone owns one of these today and it is not registered, there is no legal way to register it - this, in our free democracy - plus, there are revolvers with shorter barrels sold today not requiring registration because they are also chambered for 45 ammo and have rifled barrels - bureaucratic logic !!!

    Most expensive (to me) gift I ever got.
     
  15. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    Not exactly correct.
    If you own something that should be NFA and it is not registered, it has the possibility of getting you into trouble.

    The ability for normal people to make machine guns and have added to the registry went away in 1986.

    We still have the ability to make short barreled shotguns, rifles, devices of destruction and suppressors.

    Odds are with that kind of gun, the gov. would offer a very sweet deal, rather than go to court. Because although the law is on their side a jury might not see it as cut and dry as long as the offender is not a criminal in any other way.


    Now back to your regularly scheduled thread.:wavey:
     
  16. Berto

    Berto woo woo

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    Very neat Buntline version of the 686, we have one in the 5" bbl, great shooter too.
     
  17. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Some cool pics of guns you don't see every day. :)
     
  18. Berto

    Berto woo woo

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    Sportsman 999

    [​IMG]

    (bump)
     
  19. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    My grandfather had one of those.
    I never was able to shoot it with him.
    I shot it when I was younger and then let my brother have it when dividing things up.
    It is a great gun, but ours broke the firing pin spring guide and then we were getting misfires.
     
  20. OJ

    OJ Deceased Millennium Member

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    My not mentioning the penalty was just an oversight - the fine for possessing an unregistered H&R Handy Gun is - and has always been $10,000.

    Eric Larsen of Takoma Park MD published a very extensive little booklet on the Handy Gun and his efforts over many decades to try to get the Handy Gun removed from the NFA list - without any success despite arguments it was really only a Curio and Relic - chambered for only 2 1/2" shells and no choke - clearly not in the same class as a "sawed-off" shotgun.

    Interesting it's OK to produce and sell the revolver - the "Judge" - with much more lethal potential - simply because it has a rifled barrel -:upeyes:

    I don't share your optimism that the government would opt for a "sweet deal" rather than go to court - based on Eric Larsen's experience, the ATF is more interested in confiscating Handy Guns and fining "perps"- it would cost the defendant more than the government to go to court since the ATF lawyers are paid by taxpayers.

    You seem to have misunderstood my statement that one can buy and resister a fully automatic machine gun today - it's true - I made no mention of individuals making their own. My point was the ATF treats machine gunners different than Handy Gun owners. If you inherited a machine gun, you could get it registered - though at significant monetary cost - but, the same is not true of Handy Guns - trust me - I've been dealing with this some 76 years and have explored the possibilities - like what to do to handle things in my estate regarding my handy Gun.

    :upeyes: