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gyros meat

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by scowan007, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    Anyone know how to make it?
     
  2. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    Heath food stores sell a brand of Gyros spice mix that can be added to either ground beef, lamb, or...GAG...tofu.

    I need to visit Earth Fare or Rosewood Market soon. I'll report what I find. Haven't bought it in several years but it's excellent.
     

  3. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    I did get one of those mixes at Wild Oats once. It wasn't very good.

    NO! I didn't use tofu!;)
     
  4. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    The mix I bought I made into "meatloaf" then cut into thin slices.

    Sorry to hear your experience was less than good.

    The "gyro meat" you see in restaurants is often pre-formed, pre-cooked beef-lamb mixture.
     
  5. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    THat sounds like the one I got. I used 2/3 beef and 1/3 lamb. I believe the mix was from "fantastic foods"? THey used to make a "shells and curry that was really good with chicken or even "gasp" tofu. Haven't seen it in years.

    I got so spoiled many years ago, staying in omonia (sp?) square in Athens and getting gyros and souvlaki off a cart. 2 bucks worth and you couldn't finish it! And it was awesome. We were starving students, so we ate there on average twice a day.:)
     
  6. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    The meat was chopped-up with two cleavers different but good.


    This is one I found on the web.

    Make Your Own Gyro Meat
    Posted by WingsFan91 at recipegoldmine.com 6/5/01 12:38:45 pm

    I found the following on that "other" site.... Thought somebody here might want it! :)

    Hi there! I have lived and worked in Greece for a few years, and worked as a butcher in the U.S. for quite some time, so let me shed a bit of light:

    Donair (doner or Donar), Gyros, and Schwarma are all pretty much the same thing. The Doner Kebab (probably the closest original ethnic food to the American invention, the Gyro) is originally from Turkey. The gyro is an American invention which is basically a cheap version of a traditional Greek Kebab (the main difference is that the Greek one would use large pieces of boned lamb, pressed together using its own fat as a binder, and marinated, whereas Gyro uses ground meat.) The Schwarma is a version from the Middle East that is much larger, uses a similar meat to the Greek kebab, but less meat and more vegetables in the kebab itself.

    A traditional gyro should be made with at least 50% ground lamb, and the rest beef. The best ground to use is one with a high fat content (this is so that during the remixing it binds and keeps it shape well!). The main flavouring ingredients should always be: garlic, onion, marjoram, rosemary, salt and black pepper. Marjoram and Rosemary are similar to oregano and thyme in flavour (respectively), and are common ingredients in Greek cooking. True Greek food rarely uses oregano. The mass-produced Gyros use oregano, not to mention garlic and onion powder, but we used fresh minced garlic and onions. Here is the recipe we used where I used to work (compliments of Feller's Meat in Clearfield, Utah!)

    1 pound ground lamb
    1/2 cup very finely chopped (or shredded) onion
    2 teaspoons fresh minced garlic
    3/4 teaspoon salt (preferably sea salt)
    1/2 teaspoon dried ground marjoram
    1/2 teaspoon dried ground rosemary
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    Mix everything together and let sit in the fridge for 1-2 hours.

    Blend in a food processor for about 1 minute. (When cooked, this will help give it a more traditional gyro feel on your palate. Otherwise, it just takes like cooked minced meat.)

    Form into an oblong around a spit, and slow cook over a grill for around 30-45 minutes, cooking far from the coals, and rotating slowly. Alternatively, bake in the oven in a meatloaf shape for about 45 minutes to 1 hour, at 325 degrees F. It should be a bit dry.

    I hope that helps! ~ Wayne

    P.S. Tzatziki is made with 500 ml. plain natural or Greek yogurt, 1 cucumber which has been peeled and descended and grated and drained of extra liquid, and 2-4 cloves of fresh minced garlic. Mix together, and let sit in fridge until ready to use. This is an extremely traditional recipe, and might be a bit sharp for the average American palate, so you might want to halve the garlic amount.
     
  7. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    Lethal,
    THanks!
    ;c