Gun scrubber and the firing pin and channel

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by cubbyjg, Mar 7, 2010.

  1. cubbyjg

    cubbyjg

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    Is it okay to spray the firing pin and channel with gun scrubber before putting the gun back together?
     
  2. zeke66

    zeke66

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    Yes. Just don't lube in there.
     

  3. bentbiker

    bentbiker

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    Because of the channel liner, cups and sleeve, I choose to use a weaker solvent, isopropyl alcohol.
     
  4. burthouse

    burthouse

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    Are you detail stripping or Field stripping. You shouldn't be putting any solvent in there. So my answer is no it's not okay. I agree with bent if you are going to clean it out at all assuming you're detail stripping the slide use Q-tips and alcohol if a dry Q-tip doesn't feel like it's getting it all.
     
  5. cubbyjg

    cubbyjg

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    No i am just field stripping it. And i already shot some gun scrubber in there. Ive done it on my other firearms so i thought it should be okay. No lube will go in there though. Is it bad to spray this stuff into the firing channel?
     
  6. bentbiker

    bentbiker

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    Yes..
     
  7. jack76590

    jack76590

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    When I detail strip the slide I use non chlorinated brake cleaner to blow out the curd in the slide, esp the parts of slide holding firing pin and extractor. Non chlorinated brake cleaner claims to not harm most plastics - channel liner is plastic.

    To clean the firing pin assembly I will generally take it apart, clean and wipe dry.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2010
  8. EKUJustice

    EKUJustice

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    If you want to clean the firing pin channel, do it the correct way and disassemble the slide. It is a piece cake with the glock. Don't just half *** it with the spray can
     
  9. cubbyjg

    cubbyjg

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    im using the gunscrubber that is made for polymer frames. I figured it wouldnt hurt the plastic parts. Im a little confused now. How does everyone normally clean the slide? Do you just take a rag and wipe everything off? I used hoppes #9 and a toothbrush to scrub everything and then hit it with gunscrubber to clean any residue and dirt off. I didnt put any hoppes in the firing channel though.
     
  10. Never Nervous

    Never Nervous

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    This.
     
  11. EKUJustice

    EKUJustice

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    Wipe it off for a quick clean, for good cleaning the guts come out. It takes under a min to gut the slide spraying stuff on a gun thats not stripped tends to move stuff
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2010
  12. FillYerHands

    FillYerHands you son of a

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    Gunscrub is okay. I spray it in there because I never know what else went in there.
     
  13. Markasaurus

    Markasaurus

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    I have read a lot of arguments about hoppe's, it is certainly #1 choice to clean the barrel. There are a lot of people who say it is best to keep it away from the plastic parts and i agree with that.

    As for the brake cleaner. i work on automotive and there are plenty of parts in vehicle brake calipers and drum brakes that are plastic or rubber, such as seals on the caliper piston and the neoprene covers over the sliding pins of the caliper. If brake cleaner affected them, you can bet the brake cleaner company would have been sued and had to change formula by now.

    I think you would be alright doing this once in a while. Probably ought to remove the firing pin anyway every 1000 rounds and clean the channel but in the meantime i don't think it would do any harm if the solvent evaporates fast.
    Remember though except for that little hole in the underside of the slide, and the firing pin hole in the breech face, any solvent you blow in there has no place to go.

    When i remove the firing pin, i usually leave it assembled and hose it off with the brake cleaner. Then a quick scrub with a toothbrush and another hosing off. Then wipe clean everything with rags and q-tips (i noticed a slight buildup of firing dirt on the firing pin face and this gun has only about 300 rounds through it.) A quick spritz down the firing pin hole and then several q-tips, then a cleaning patch stuffed down in there (no metallic cleaning brushes inside there of course, the liner inside is plastic!) and it will be clean.

    Everything on the firing pin behind the firing pin face itself ought to be relatively clean, i believe if you wipe off the brake cleaner it probably won't have time to damage the plastic. If a chemical will damage plastic it almost always happens on contact.

    The advice everyone including Glock gives is never lubricate the firing pin. The plastic is self-lubricating, supposedly, and any lubricant only attracts dirt. I thought graphite might be a great lube and posted such here, and the idea was quickly nixed, and the respondents are right - if glock thought there should be any lube of any kind they would say so. But they say leave it clean and dry, period.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2010
  14. greyeyezz

    greyeyezz

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  15. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    The Gun Scrubber won't hurt it any. You should detail strip it once in a while and use a good q-tip to clean it out. I spray some of the polymer safe gun scrubber in there when I have it detailed stripped.

    I know of people who have used brake cleaner from NAPA for years on Glocks, and while it is not recommended, I have never seen any damage to the liner or other plastic parts.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2010
  16. bentbiker

    bentbiker

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    There is a big difference between what you do and what you are OK'ing the OP to do. He is spraying it into a closed up channel with nowhere to escape. The solvent, at best washes all the crud off the walls and down to the bottom of the channel to to form sludge. When allowed to soak in solvents, even weak solvents, plastics will absorb them, swelling and softening the plastic. Over the long haul, it is just not a risk worth taking. Downsides way outweigh the upsides.
     
  17. cubbyjg

    cubbyjg

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    Thanks everyone. I will clean my glock differently from my other handgun. Ill just keep it simple. Use a rag with a little CLP and wipe everything down then dry it up. Lube and let the lead fly next go at the range. Oh, and nothing in the firing pin channel.
     
  18. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    Good point. You are right. Thanks for the follow up.
     
  19. DLL9mm

    DLL9mm

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    I spary it when I detail strip my slide. Then I use q-tips and Duster to make sure its clean/dry. Gun-scrubber is good for those hard-to-reach spots.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010