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Inside, both work, but if the ambient light is bright, the green really excels! I prefer green, but they are more expensive.

I would love to hear feedback from those who tactically train, but the one thing I do notice is that on light colored walls at night, the green does impact your night vision far more than the red does. Red is a great color for retaining your good night vision (ask astronomers!). The green may have a bit of a disadvantage in that regard.
 

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Why? During
World War Two those submarines (all sides) spent nights on the surface and before surfacing
all lights inside submarines turned on all red lights inside for a period of time before surfacing and as soon as the sub surfaced essential officers and enlisted watch sailors went top side.
So, not just astronomers are aware of this.
Good discussion on color of lasers. Personally I have laser with both red and green and in
bright daylight (and ouf sunlight is very bright here in the desert) I haven't found my green
lasers that much better than the red. Maybe something larger than a small dot may show
green superior.
Poli Viejo
All light can impair night vision, but perception (green is seen as more intense at the same power as red) and biological impact (amount of light of various wavelengths and desensitization) can vary.

Rods are more sensitive to light (seeing in the dark) and are concentrated in the periphery. These are what we primarily rely on for night vision.
Cones aid in detecting color, and there are different types that are more sensitive for certain wavelengths of light. These are focused in the center of the eye (good for sharpness and clarity).

Any light can disrupt night vision (even red), but light that both 1.) blast all three cone color types and 2.) provide enough light to desensitize light sensitive cones will have a more detrimental impact on night vision than lower levels of light, or light that does not over-stimulate as many cones.

Red light is targeted more towards one type of red-sensitive cone (as an example of cone/color types, when a camera flash goes off, much of that bluish/white dot you see for a minute is the blue cones recovering, hence the blueish tint). Any light can stimulate the rods and cones, but some are designed to be more sensitive to certain wavelengths.
Rods: Pick up ANY light (night vision, few colors but can see light/absence of light... more black/white in net effect)
Cones: Pick up color for acuity (good daylight vision, lots of colors, sweet spot of the focal point of the eye, eagle vision)

To visualize the impact of a color of laser, see how much overlap it has with the Rods, and other colors. Red lasers used in typical hand-held versions are usually 650nm. Green lasers are usually 532nm. One can see how much more overlap the green has with the rods, and the eye is naturally more sensitive to the lower wavelengths.



A bright red laser or red light will still hurt your adaptive night vision. But dim red lights will minimize the negative impact to your night vision. Bright white (or green) light will absolutely impact your adaptation to low light. Of course, a quick strobe of white light to an intruder's eyes from a mega-lumen weapon light can REALLY negatively impact the bad guy's vision more than yours (first, you can shield your eyes if you know when you will pulse the light, and second, in your home darkness and inability to see are your friend if you need to move around the house, as you know where the table is that you stub your toe on and how to move around the walls!).
 
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