Great trick for thickening stews and soups...

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by Mild Bill, May 27, 2005.

  1. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    I just did it and my imagination was correct...

    I toasted some dry oatmeal in a non-stick pan till colored, but not too dark...

    Then I put it in a coffee/spice grinder and powderized it...

    It was "toasted oatmeal flour" and it thickened the stew real nice, as well as giving
    it an interesting and additional flavor dimension...

    I just used a couple tablespoons for a decent sized stewpot...

    ;c
     
  2. S2nd

    S2nd One happy cat

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    I am going to have to try that. I generally use corn starch, and it's a pain in the rectum to keep it from clumping.

    Thanks for the tip!
     

  3. modgun

    modgun CLM

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    Instant mashed potato flakes.
     
  4. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    The secret is to put a small amount of cornstarch into a jar with some cold water and shake well. then pour it into whatever you're cooking.
     
  5. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    Right... Or cold milk, or half and half...

    I use the tater flakes too, but this is tasty, and healthier too I think...

    ;c
     
  6. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    +1 cold water. don't have your stew bubbling when you put the cornstarch/water mixture in. mix thoroughly, then increase the heat to boil.
     
  7. 4eyes

    4eyes Provocateur

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    Hey Bill. Try masa for another interesting taste and similar thickening results.
     
  8. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    I thought I was told way back when that warm water works best. Am I recalling incorrectly?
     
  9. modgun

    modgun CLM

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    Ive always done cold with a fork, but only because I was told to.
     
  10. kool aid

    kool aid MR.10mm

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    The best (Cheat) way is to make what they call a slurry (corn starch or flour normally) with water or milk at room temp. But before you add it to your stew or gravey take some of the liquid from the stew and stir it into your thickener first this is called tempering and it helps to reduce the chance of lumps.



    The best way (if you not worried about calories) is to make a
    "Roux
    Definition: [ROO] A mixture of flour and fat that, after being slowly cooked over low heat, is used to thicken mixtures such as soups and sauces. There are three classic roux--white, blond and brown. The color and flavor is determined by the length of time the mixture is cooked. Both white roux and blond roux are made with butter. The former is cooked just until it begins to turn beige and the latter until pale golden. Both are used to thicken cream and white sauces and light soups. The fuller-flavored brown roux can be made with butter, drippings or pork or beef fat. It's cooked to a deep golden brown and used for rich, dark soups and sauces. cajun and creole dishes use a lard-based roux, which is cooked (sometimes for almost an hour) until a beautiful mahogany brown. This dark nutty-flavored base is indispensable for specialties like gumbo."

    I got this from --->foodtv.com
     
  11. noway

    noway

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    Cornstarch and garbanzo flour both makes great thickenings.
     
  12. kool aid

    kool aid MR.10mm

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    garbanzo flour ? I learn something new every day. I never heard of such a thing before.
     
  13. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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  14. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    Moderator!!









    ;a
     
  15. noway

    noway

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    {garbanzo flour ? I learn something new every day. I never heard of such a thing before}

    Garbanzo a.k.a chick peas....

    A great flour for deep frying or other various foods. Common in Latin, down south & Caribbean foods.
     
  16. okla-lawman

    okla-lawman

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    For chili or other southwest soups try the leftover broken tortilla chips. Watch the salt content though.
     
  17. VictorLouis

    VictorLouis

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    I pre-mix the starch, or even flour, in some water in a coffee cup using a fork. Sometimes, I will dip off, or drain off, some of the liquid from what I'm going to be thickening, and adding to the cup.

    Don't EVER sprinkle in the starch thinking you can cheat. It WILL clump up on you nasty.;Q

    I will try the masa, and the chick-pea flour as suggested. If it's not been mentioned already, potato starch also seems to work out well.
     
  18. Rinspeed

    Rinspeed JAFO

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    Roux works very well for a lot of different sauces and soups. The key to a good roux is you have to cook it for 8-10 minutes to get the flour taste out of it. This is done on very low heat and you must stir it constantly to prevent it from browning too much.
     
  19. S2nd

    S2nd One happy cat

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    Corn starch mixed with warm water, shaken in a jar, with some of the broth. Thanks! I'll try that after the oatmeal ;f

    I've been mixing corn starch in a buttercup with cold water, and you can imagine how tedious that is ;g
     
  20. K.C. Dia

    K.C. Dia

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    Try arrowroot. It is a little expensive, but foolproof.