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Going to jail for getting a good deal at car dealer

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by berto62, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

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    If I were the buyer I would offer to set down with the owner of the dealership. He could have one opportunity to convince me that his dealership would never do anything that stupid again and one chance to offer me compensation. If he failed he could live with the consequences, if he did right by me I would offer to appear on the local TV news, shake his hand and call no hard feelings.

    For an instance of false arrest I would expect a letter of apology that clearly stated that the dealership was 100% at fault. I would expect not to make any payments on that vehicle.
     
  2. Peace Warrior

    Peace Warrior Am Yisrael Chai CLM

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    How were the Police sloppy? I'm thinking they were double checking and covering their butts the whole way.
     

  3. zoyter2

    zoyter2 Yeah, so what?

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    I agree. It is beyond my understanding how anyone could possibly think that this type of behavior from a dealership is only worth "how much it actually cost the customer". That is sorta contrary to the entire reason lawsuits are allowed punitive damages. I know that at least two of our local dealerships would pay the 2.2 and chuckle about the slap on the wrist.

    You gotta make them feel the pain to change the behavior.
     
  4. Mayhem like Me

    Mayhem like Me Semper Paratus

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    This is gng, the police are always wrong to some extent.


    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  5. norton

    norton

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    I don't blame the Po Po. They didn't initiate the situation. Something tells me we don't know the whole story from the short article that was posted by the op.
    Most of my blame goes to the customer and the dealership. This could have been handled in a civil manner if parties weren't out to screw one another.
     
  6. roger123

    roger123

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    I live in VA Beach and from what I've seen around here the police were probably only too happy to go and get this guy. They seem a little "intense" around here. Wouldn't the guy have a receipt in his hand if he paid cash for the car to show them?

    I've only bought 5 new cars in my life but every time it went something like, look at the car, decide to buy the car, get money for the car (lately I've been going with the pre-approved check from the bank), hand them the money, get the car and leave.

    I've never had any car dealer tell me to take the car, sign here and then go and figure out the money. I may be naive here but wouldn't paying for the car be a good idea all around before driving it off the lot? No other purchase I make works like that so why does it happen in car deals?

    I guess they want to get you into the car so you're emotionally attached then they can screw you latter but it seems to bring in a lot of other issues down the road.
     
  7. Drain You

    Drain You NRA member

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    What a loser.
     
  8. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    SW,

    Google "vicarious/employer liability".

    If it's that easy to have someone arrested over my screwup then it should be like wise that easy for me to face punishment to the same severity as the person who suffered. You are (essentially :)) a mathematician. In your professional experience, what is the potential long term damage to the plaintiff, especially as NurseTim points out, he wants to become a NP, or CRNA (certified registered nurse anesthesiologist)?

    What is the damage to you if you are "unlawfully" arrested, printed, and placed in jail for a couple of hours? It is never really "expunged".
     
  9. frizz

    frizz

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    When you do something bad you deserved to be punished. What this dealer did was despicable. Employers are responsible for what their employees do (respondeat superior), and this wasn't just some screwup by a minion; a manager did this.
     
  10. frizz

    frizz

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    Unclean hands? For a willful tort? :rofl:
     
  11. frizz

    frizz

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    That is to be determined at trial.You also have to look at the punitive damages.
     
  12. frizz

    frizz

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    That says a lot. If you were in this business, then you should know about the unethical sleaze that permeates this industry.

    Considering what a sleazy, high-volume dealership like this has made on screwing people, they are getting off easy even at 2.2Mil.
     
  13. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    Like I said, I ran a car dealership. One of my guys once got drunk and drove one of our cars through someone's house. I know about liability.

    Imagine that this person didn't work for a dealership for a moment, but was a private citizen who had sold a car privately. He files a false police report and gets the buyer arrested. Who would you sue for a few million bucks in that case? No one.

    As soon as a business with deep pockets gets involved, all of a sudden people are clamoring for blood. This lawsuit mentality is why it's so expensive to do business in this country.
     
  14. Gareth68

    Gareth68

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    I agree.

    Unfortunately, you can't lock the owner of the dealership up and give him a false criminal record....which would be fair.

    Since an eye for an eye is not civilized, you are left with working out a fiscal solution.

    :dunno:
     
  15. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    What makes you think that would be fair? Heck, what makes you think the owner had any idea about it in the first place? I only saw my dealership's owner twice a year when he came to visit his money. I never ran deals by him. He wasn't involved in the day-to-day operations at all.

    Figure out who filed the false police report and throw his ass in jail.
     
  16. frizz

    frizz

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    A rare gem. Stick with them and pray that they are never bought out.
     
  17. frizz

    frizz

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    I was about to apologize to you for my insinuation, but if you were "getting tired of lying" then you have a problem, and you don't deserve an apology.

    Note that he changed one color SUV for the same one in a different color. The "trim" may have been different. Or maybe they were the same except for color, and the dealership was going to stick him with full price, but got sloppy.
     
  18. frizz

    frizz

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    Maybe. But unethical activity is the norm. You have admitted to this behavior yourself.
     
  19. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    Hey, if in your scenario it happened where I was born, there is a very distinct possibility I would have gone back to his house and burnt it to the ground AND probably beat the **** out of him, AND take his money by force, AND he'd have to STFU on fear of imminent death. Seeing that I love dogs, and I'm not truly malicious, I would probably not shoot his dog on the spot.

    Or I could have paid someone about $85 US dollars to do all of that, and any other private citizen there knows how thin the veneer is between civilization and savagery.

    But, :supergrin: since this is the great US of A, I play by the rules. If it were a private citizen, crap like that would not have transpired in the 1st place, and no police agency or officer would have intervened in what would have been IDed as a strict civil matter.

    To answer your question, if the same scenario got to a point of my arrest, and the complainant was a private citizen, I want everything he has, as allowed by the law.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2012
  20. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    There are degrees of lying. I never cheated people, but when people asked me "should I buy this car" what was I going to say? Americans buy too many cars? Cars last for 10-15 years? No. I said some salesman ****.

    I am massively disinterested in your apology. I was in the car business for years, I've been out of it for years, and I'm very grateful for the experience and the things that I learned.