Gluten Free

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by michael88, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. michael88

    michael88

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    So as anyone here allergic to glutten? the wife says we are experimenting to see if thats what has been causing my digestive system hell for the last few months. basically no glutten for me for 2 weeks. that crap is in everything. spices too, how do you get into spices, this is going to suck. anyone know of good stuff i can eat?
     
  2. arlessinfl

    arlessinfl

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    Probably will be easier to run the gluten allergy tests or the celiac test.

    :)
     

  3. Shimmy & Shake

    Shimmy & Shake

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    My wife was diagnosed with Celiac disease about 2.5 years ago, took us a while but we've made the necessary adjustments. Shop at Whole Foods, Trader Joes etc..., they both have a vast array of Gluten free items. Go on-line and find out which of your favorite restaurants have Gluten free menus, and if you like beer Redbridge seems to be the best, hell; I even steal 1 or 2 from the wife if I run out of my own...

    [​IMG]

    Good luck...
     
  4. michael88

    michael88

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    i assume at any normal practitioner? i heard testing for food allergies is quite difficult.
     
  5. digitsmaw

    digitsmaw MinniesMaw Too

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    My sister has celiac's and it took the docs several tries at several different tests as there are loads of false negatives and false positives with ALL the types of tests available.

    If a restaurant serves hamburgers and toasts the buns on the same grill my sister needs to avoid the place. Likewise, if they deep fry breaded chicken in the same oil they use for fries.

    When she came out to visit I went up to Whole Foods and bought loads of gluten free frozen dinners. I surely am grateful that I have a much lighter case than she does - I could never afford all the special foods she has to have. Yep, that stuff is in everything
     
  6. guitarguy69

    guitarguy69 Glock'N Roll

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    Wife had a bad time this spring,....... really bad time. Long story short, 5-6-7-8 tests later, Celiac disease. Lots of research later and we have found a few good things. Namely rice noodles and rice crust pizza. It takes a bit to get used to but no huge hurdle. Redbridge is good, but Grist is the favorite here. Doc told the wife it would take at least a month, minimum, to feel the benefits, and as stated just a little bit will cause intestinal problems again. Such as a bun being toasted on the grill. We use separate peanut butter and also separate butter too. Different toasters, and I always cook her food first. Progresso sells a gluten free cream of mushroom that is ok for casseroles but it must be thickened up. I even scored points for cooking gluten free green bean casserole this Thanksgiving. And yes, look up gluten free restaurants or ones that prepare gluten free food. By the way the blue diamond nut thins rock! :cool:


    P.S. help us find a good bread?
     
  7. ElevatedThreat

    ElevatedThreat NRA Member

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    About 3 years ago, in my mid-40s, I suddenly started to have all sorts of inexplicable and disturbing neurological symptoms, including numbness, pain in my hands and feet, gradual loss of hearing, and trouble with balance/walking.

    After exhausting several teams of Rheumatologists and Neurologists with no diagnosis, including the "experts" at a local teaching hospital, and after enduring every blood test and imaging test imaginable, finally surgeons at Johns Hopkins biopsied the nerves at several places along my legs, and gave me a diagnosis of Idiopathic Sensory Ganglionopathy (ISG).

    ISG is a rare and fatal disorder, with no effective treatment. (It's a long way of saying your nerves are demylenating, and dying where they meet your spine.)

    Well, in searching the internet for a way to avoid dying horribly by inches, I eventually found information at the Mayo Clinic Website where a doctor there autopsied a number of ISG victims, and concluded that they had symptoms of undiagnosed Celiac disease.

    I immediately gave up all Gluten, and within a month I was better, and after 6 months I was back to normal. And I had taken all the blood tests for Celiac and was negative.

    No one can tell me why I suddenly became deathly allergic to Gluten in middle age, but there it is. (Although I believe that it may be related to some heavy-duty antibiotics I took just then, for a badly infected root canal.)

    The bad thing about eating Gluten-Free foods from the grocery store is, to make up for their inherent lack of flavor, they are loaded down with extra fat and sugar. So you tend to gain weight if you eat them in the same amounts that you did the normal Gluten-bearing equivalents.

    I now stick to a diet of organic meat (non-organic fresh meat can have Gluten-bearing flavor solution injected into it, to flavor it and up the weight, without the label so indicating), fruits, nuts, vegetables, potatoes, corn, and rice.

    Yeah, it is a bland diet, with no bread or pasta or pizza(!), but it is better than dying in agony, after ending up looking like Stephen Hawking....

    -ET
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2010
  8. DEADLYACCURATE

    DEADLYACCURATE Senior Member

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    um what exactly is gluten
     
  9. hatidua

    hatidua

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    protein found in rye/wheat/barley.
     
  10. arlessinfl

    arlessinfl

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    I have been concerned about a possible gluten allergy. But after trying the diet for about a week, I found out that I can also be allergy tested and/or celiac tested directly.

    I do not think that a severe diet modification is a good way to go if you are just wanting to test for a possible allergy or celiac since (like an earlier poster said) it may take a month or two before you see any results from the diet change.
     
  11. michael88

    michael88

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    good info guys, my question is how accurate are the tests? for example if i go in and specifically ask to be tested for celiac/glutten will it be accurate?
     
  12. StarvinMarvin

    StarvinMarvin

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    My mom has been on the gluten-free diet for a few years now, and bread is the one thing that isn't near as good.

    I know this isn't what you are looking for, but from a non-celiac point of view, none of the bread is any good. I imagine you'll eventually just forget what bread used to taste like - only then will you be able to stomach that other stuff...
     
  13. geofri

    geofri Poikilotherm™ Lifetime Member

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    I tested positive for gluten allergy, but not celiacs.
    I had headaches daily, and finally realized that wasn't normal, so i got tested. went off wheat/gluten for a year-ish, and then tried going back on it. now i can eat it without getting the headaches. I do notice a definite difference in feeling, after eating. wheat still leaves me feeling bloated. so i just avoid eating it in excess. I'd get re-tested, but I don't trust the test to begin with, and its expensive.

    Just forget all about bread. unless you like Styrofoam and cardboard:whistling:

    Some of the rice pasta is easy to get used to, and you forget what wheat pasta tastes like (as well as texture).

    Eta: I ate a lot of corn tortillas too
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2010
  14. Rabid Rabbit

    Rabid Rabbit

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    We figured out my son 6 months old at the time was not alergic but sensitive to gluten. It didn't show up on tests but we could tell when we changed his diapers. It took time but we found a number of products that did not have any gluten in it at natural food and gourmet supermarkets like wegmans. Yeah corn based pasta was a little different but was a good sub. You really have to watch the labels, wheat shows up in the oddest places like soy sauce.
     
  15. Mrs.Cicero

    Mrs.Cicero Wayward Member

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    I have been on a gluten free diet for a year and a half. Blue Diamond Nut thins are so good everyone else in my family steals mine. There are a few good gluten free microwavable Thai meals, I think by Thai Kitchen. Trader Joe's has some good stuff. Everything else sucks. I now do a great deal of crock pot roasts (beef, venison and pork - everything I buy is organic, no additives, or I hunt it myself) and chicken (same way - NO INJECTED WITH FLAVOR GARBAGE) and I make and freeze a lot of soups and stews and eat a lot of fruit and vegetable salads. Basically, NO processed, pre-made stuff, since if I eat it every joint in my body will protest for the next week, and I will scream if anyone touches me. The "cook for a weekend eat for a month" kind of thing works great as long as the ingredients are all from scratch (yes, I even have to make my own catalina dressing, because the store bought stuff has modified food starch and dextrose and maltodextrin and non-specified spices/flavorings all of which coem from wheat or are adulterated by it. Anyway, it has been somewhat irritating, but I have lost 10# and feel 80% better, tho' my hands and feet and face are still numb. At least nothing hurts anymore. It took 5 weeks of no gluten before I woke up one morning and said "O WOW I FEEL NORMAL FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 5 YEARS!"
    Oh, and I drink mead instead of beer.

    Good luck.
    Mrs.Cicero
     
  16. ElevatedThreat

    ElevatedThreat NRA Member

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    In my case, the usual Gluten allergy tests were useless. False negatives.

    I tested negative on not only the usual bloodtest, but also a more sophisticated one that I requested when the first one was negative.

    Yet I am 100% deathly allergic to Gluten, and can make my severe neurological symptoms start to return by eating wheat for less than a week.

    I've been Gluten free now for a couple of years, and I am perfectly normal, so long as I avoid Gluten.

    If I had gone by the Celiac tests, I'd literally be dead by now.

    Anyone who suspects a serious Gluten allergy needs to go Gluten free for 30-60 days to see if their symptoms abate.

    -ET
     
  17. 390ish

    390ish

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    I have celiac. Symptoms went away when I was a kid, then when I got older and my stress level got out of whack, symptoms came on strong. No energy and not feeling right. The small intestine biopsy is the only real accurate test from what I understand. The blood test can give false positives a lot of the time.

    I never much cared for bread or crackers. I do like pizza. Most non-chain places will let you bring in a thawed gluten-free crust that they are happy to prepare. Eating out pretty much does not happen unless you know the folks at the restaurant very well. One exception is waffle house -- I like the hashbrowns. Wendy's is allright also, no gluten in the chili and you can get the south west salad or get a burger without the bun. I eat a lot of rice at meals and make about one pot of chili a week. It is not that bad of an allergy. If I eat gluten, it is like having a nasty hangover for almost two days. Last time I ingested some wheat at a cook out (bread crumbs in the burgers) I went to the pharmacy and got some syrup of ipicac. That stuff works, and then some. I would call it a dead heat between taking that stuff and dealing with the effects of gluten.
     
  18. Reagan40

    Reagan40

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    I am going through the testing currently. I got off it for two weeks, and felt better than I ever remember. My dad was diagnosed a couple of years ago. My doctor made me go back on gluten for two weeks before I started the testing. I guess you have to have it in your system for the tests to be accurate. I feel normal again, which means lots of headaches and fatigued. It also causes dry and inflamed skin. I cannot wait to get off it again once the tests are done.
     
  19. john58

    john58 BHO is a LIAR!

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    Gluten gleeben glouten globen? all right!




    who's a fan?
     
  20. ElevatedThreat

    ElevatedThreat NRA Member

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    Look out for hidden sources of wheat gluten in foods, not listed on the label:

    1) "Flavor solution," almost universally injected into any and all fresh meat, including cut up chicken parts and even ground beef, as found in the grocery store fresh meat case, but often not listed on the label. "All natural" does not mean there is no wheat in it!

    Buy "organic" meats, or those that boast "nothing added."


    2) "Modified food starch" -- might be anything from corn to soy to wheat.


    3) "Vinegar" -- unless it specifies "cider vinegar."

    "Distilled" vinegar can be wheat or cider based.


    4) Soy sauce (which oddly enough is rarely made from soy, but mostly made from wheat).


    5) "Textured protein," which can include wheat gluten.


    6) "Artificial and natural flavoring" which may include wheat.


    7) "Crispy" anything, like crispy frozen french fries, since these are rolled in flour or bread crumbs before frying. "Batter dipped" usually means wheat flour.


    Even "100% oats" can be cross-contaminated with wheat, because they are often ground on the same processing equipment at the flour mill.


    And, of course, shun anything with wheat, rye, or barley flour in it....

    -ET