Glock Talk banner

Glock Trigger

4909 Views 31 Replies 27 Participants Last post by  danbocog
I carry a 1911 for EDC and yesterday I picked up a new G19 Gen 4 which i have not yet shot but did lots of dry firing while watching TV last night. I hope to carry this pistol after breaking it in. It fits my small hands hand like a glove.

Initial impression - the trigger pull feels very heavy, very long and very gritty. Is this the typical Glock trigger? Will it improve after firing several hundred rounds through her? If not, can you recommend some mods to improve the trigger and change my initial impressions?

Would appreciate your thoughts on your triggers.

Thanks!

Jim
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
You'll find divided opinions on Glock triggers. Many will say it's fine as is, others modify theirs or replace the trigger assembly altogether. I agree with you about the long, gritty, heavy, etc. I have a Gen 4 19 that was this way. I came from years of shooting tuned 1911's and the Glock trigger was like an attack from an alien planet. I tried the .25 trigger job, new connector and it didn't do much good. Trigger pull on my scale was just under 7lb. I was shooting IDPA with it and picked up a Gen 3 34 for a match gun. Trigger pull was lighter at just over 4.5lb but I still didn't like the long takeup. There's a lot of replacement triggers out there. ZEV, Glocktriggers.com, Johnny Glock, DK Custom, and a couple of others. I replaced the entire trigger assembly with one from DK Custom and couldn't be happier. The long takeup is gone, and the hammer drops at 3lb even on the 34. Liked it so well I replaced the one in the 19 as well, except I swapped the 4lb striker spring with the 4.5lb that comes in the kit. The 19 now pulls at 3.5lb even.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I've had two varying experiences. My first glock was a g4 17 and the trigger that came on that gun was atrocious. Long, no clear break point. I won't say gritty but I came to call it the mush factory. I replaced the connector with a ghost 4.5lb and the problems went away and all was well. Now to be fair that was an earlier gen 4 and I had seen more complaints on them trigger-wise.

My most recent purchase was a gen 4 21 and I was immediately impressed at how much better the stock trigger is. Cleaner break much more predictable. I've had it to the range twice and have no plans to mod the trigger assembly at all. My belief is glock has dealt with the early trigger hiccups on the Gen 4's

But my take away is, if you're buying a glock and you are able, dry fire a few and buy the best one.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
This is the common Glock trigger. Some a little better than others. My work gun has about 20k through it. It did lighten up and smooth out but still spongey compared to a 1911. Once you get used to the differences it will never let you down.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
I also own a G19 that gets carried a lot. I have done the 26¢ trigger job, switched to a flat style G17 trigger, bought a Glock extended slide lock, and replaced the sights with AmeriGlo pro-i-dots.

The internal modifications were all made using stock Glock parts and the polishing just hurried up the "smoothing out" process.

All these mods did was make the pistol a lot more fun to take to the range.

I seriously doubt that if you needed your stock Glock in a SD situation, the grittiness or weight of the trigger is a factor.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
You simply can not compare apples to oranges and if used to a 1911 it will take time and effort to get used to the glock.
Do NOT go down the rabbit hole of endless costly efforts to get your glock to feel like your 1911. It simply never will. You will have more success simply getting used to it through practice both live and dry.
I shoot both 1911's and glocks among others and do not feel the difference is a big deal.
Basically you shoot both to reset meaning fire a shot holding the trigger to the rear and release trigger until the reset click is felt/heard and fire again in this sense ( and this sense only) they are very similar. Once you master the reset going back and forth from glocks to 1911's won't bother you at all. The trigger on the 1911 is so good you can get sloppy and still get good results on target. The glock is not so forgiving
 

· Banned
Joined
·
6,834 Posts
Glock Trigger Fundamentals
(Standard Glock parts nomenclature used. See Owner's Manual.)

The required trigger pull during most of trigger travel is controlled by the firing pin spring and the coil trigger spring. When the trigger has been pulled to the point that the trigger bar meets the sloping lip of the connector, the required pull increases as the trigger bar rides against and is pushed down by the lip. During this last phase trigger pull is controlled by the combined effects of the firing pin spring, the coil trigger spring, and the slope of the connector lip.

The firing pin spring has a very significant effect because its force directly opposes trigger pull. Decreasing the strength of the FP spring decreases required trigger pull. Glock provides a FP spring rated to exert 5.5-lbf when the firing pin has been pushed back fully by the trigger bar. Glock does not make a lower strength FP spring because there is much good evidence that 5.5-lbf is the minimum value for reliable ignition of a broad range of cartridge primers. Aftermarketers provide springs as low as 4-lbf.

The coil trigger spring exerts its force in the direction of trigger pull. Increasing the strength of the coil trigger spring decreases required trigger pull. Glock provides a coil trigger spring rated for 5.0-lbf. Glock does not make a higher strength coil trigger spring because that can prevent positive trigger reset. Aftermarketers provide springs as high as 6-lbf.

After the trigger bar contacts the sloping connector lip, required pull increases. This is the region that some call long creep and/or gritty before the final break and firing pin release. The closer that the forward angle of the connector lip is to being horizontal, the less additional pull force is required to reach trigger break...but a longer travel in the creep zone is required before the connector lip finally forces the trigger bar down far enough to release the firing pin. Conversely, a connector lip that runs more vertical results in a higher trigger pull but a shorter creep region as the trigger bar rides against the lip.

Glock makes four different connectors that differ only in lip angle to produce one of four different peak trigger pulls. For pre-Gen4 pistols, these are the resulting peak trigger pulls when the connector is installed in an otherwise completely OEM stock pistol.
MINUS (-): 4.5-lbf
DOT (.): 5.0-lbf
UNMARKED ( ): 5.5-lbf
PLUS (+): 8.0-lbf
In Gen4 pistols, the resulting peak trigger pulls listed above will be greater by 0.5-lbf.

There has never ever been a 3.5-lbf connector. That was a Glock marketing error that was corrected years ago. Some still use it because it just sounds better or sells aftermarket connectors better.

I have ignored the very small effect of the FP safety spring.

All reputable aftermarket dealers will point out the springs that they make which are rated different from Glock OEM versions should be employed for range-use only. That is the best advice ever offered.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aloha CQB and jdl2

· Banned
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
First, congrats on the new 19! I think, to answer your question, that you will find that the trigger will smooth out after you break it in, and that may fit your bill nicely. It does for me! But you may find that you want something a little crisper and smoother, especially if you're accustomed to a nice 1911 trigger breatk. Arguably the best!

There are a number of things you can do to trip your trigger even more, but I recommend taking it step by step if you should find that you want to take it further than the broken in factory trigger. If you'd like, I will PM you some suggestions I got from someone who is well experienced in this arena. Let me know!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
I got a Glock Minus trigger connector (4.5 lbs) and did the 25 cent trigger job. The trigger job is just polishing the parts of the trigger assembly that touch or rub against each other. That makes the overall pull smoother and can reduce the trigger pull weight by 1/2 to 1 full lb. Lots of good YouTube videos on this. It's a very simple thing to do. I didn't use anything but Flitz metal polish, qtips, and bore patches to hand rub the components. Some folks say to use ultra-fine emery paper to smooth the surfaces but I don't want to do ANYthing that could remove any material from the parts. I also didn't bother with a Dremel and polishing wheels. I still got a mirror finish doing it only by hand.
 

· A swamp dude
Joined
·
12,588 Posts
Glock Trigger Fundamentals
(Standard Glock parts nomenclature used. See Owner's Manual.)

The required trigger pull during most of trigger travel is controlled by the firing pin spring and the coil trigger spring. When the trigger has been pulled to the point that the trigger bar meets the sloping lip of the connector, the required pull increases as the trigger bar rides against and is pushed down by the lip. During this last phase trigger pull is controlled by the combined effects of the firing pin spring, the coil trigger spring, and the slope of the connector lip.

The firing pin spring has a very significant effect because its force directly opposes trigger pull. Decreasing the strength of the FP spring decreases required trigger pull. Glock provides a FP spring rated to exert 5.5-lbf when the firing pin has been pushed back fully by the trigger bar. Glock does not make a lower strength FP spring because there is much good evidence that 5.5-lbf is the minimum value for reliable ignition of a broad range of cartridge primers. Aftermarketers provide springs as low as 4-lbf.

The coil trigger spring exerts its force in the direction of trigger pull. Increasing the strength of the coil trigger spring decreases required trigger pull. Glock provides a coil trigger spring rated for 5.0-lbf. Glock does not make a higher strength coil trigger spring because that can prevent positive trigger reset. Aftermarketers provide springs as high as 6-lbf.

After the trigger bar contacts the sloping connector lip, required pull increases. This is the region that some call long creep and/or gritty before the final break and firing pin release. The closer that the forward angle of the connector lip is to being horizontal, the less additional pull force is required to reach trigger break...but a longer travel in the creep zone is required before the connector lip finally forces the trigger bar down far enough to release the firing pin. Conversely, a connector lip that runs more vertical results in a higher trigger pull but a shorter creep region as the trigger bar rides against the lip.

Glock makes four different connectors that differ only in lip angle to produce one of four different peak trigger pulls. For pre-Gen4 pistols, these are the resulting peak trigger pulls when the connector is installed in an otherwise completely OEM stock pistol.
MINUS (-): 4.5-lbf
DOT (.): 5.0-lbf
UNMARKED ( ): 5.5-lbf
PLUS (+): 8.0-lbf
In Gen4 pistols, the resulting peak trigger pulls listed above will be greater by 0.5-lbf.

There has never ever been a 3.5-lbf connector. That was a Glock marketing error that was corrected years ago. Some still use it because it just sounds better or sells aftermarket connectors better.

I have ignored the very small effect of the FP safety spring.

All reputable aftermarket dealers will point out the springs that they make which are rated different from Glock OEM versions should be employed for range-use only. That is the best advice ever offered.
Interesting and useful post. Thanks for taking time to provide this information.:wavey:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
10,030 Posts
Ferrari trigger versus Yugo trigger - simple as that!

You can have short/stout or you can have light/long but at the end of the day, you have to fully cock the firing pin.

You can polish things up (Google for Glock 25 cent trigger job) and that will remove the gritty feel but for a carry gun, I would just shoot it the way it came out of the box. The gritty feel will wear off.

I played with my G21SF trigger and traded short/stout versus long/light and decided that it wasn't worth it. It is back to factory stock. My G36 is just the way it came.

Try this: Shoot it the way it came for 1000 rounds. Then decide what you want to do. But never compare a Glock trigger to a Gold Cup trigger.

Richard
 

· Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I bought a 23 gen.4 glock for my carry gun. Will I just could not leave it stock. Put the big dot on spent a little over $200 on a Zev. trigger thought I was set. Well I went to the range and loved it but with that beautiful and super lite trigger its my new range gun. So I go and pick up a gen.4 glock 26 put the big dot on an start carrying. I carry hot so a trigger can be for me to lite. But I love my Zev. trigger.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
before doing any mods learn to shoot the reset.

when dry firing, first make sure your weapon is empty, then make sure there is no ammo in the area , cycle the slide, get your grip and after you have pulled the trigger, hold the trigger back while you cycle the slide, then slowly release the trigger until you feel and hear the "click" of the reset, then pull the trigger again. practice this when dry firing so you can do it during actual firing.

then shoot a couple hundred rounds, this will start to smooth things out and show the wear pattern on the different parts in the trigger assembly so if you do decide to do a 25 cent trigger job you see what direction to polish the parts.

this is how I did my Gen 3 - G31, then added a "-" connector and a 6 lbs trigger spring, my trigger breaks at right around 5 lbs, with the trigger this way and shooting the reset I feel I'm as fast and accurate as I can be without having too light a trigger on a carry weapon.

just my $0.02,

sig357fan
 
  • Like
Reactions: DubfromGA

· JABRONI AUTIST
Joined
·
8,632 Posts
I'm a believer in keep the trigger components stock although I do the .25 trigger job, but other than polishing things up, there's rarely a need to get aftermarke trigger components. After the .25 trigger job, dry fire it A LOT and practice keeping those sights perfectly still when the trigger breaks. Easy as that, and your groups will get really good too.

Better sights are bigger help than trigger upgrades!
 

· I'm not retired
Joined
·
8,500 Posts
25 cent trigger job and a minus connector and you'll be GTG. That's my opinion.

[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_PuY29jsis"]DIY Glock Trigger Job and Action Enhancement www.GlockMods.us Episode 1 - YouTube[/ame]
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
OP,
The short answer: get the "Haley Skimmer" trigger kit for your
glock.
I don't have one personally on mine but i have shot a friend of
mine who has one. A world of difference.
I will say that the glock trigger out of the box is lousy compared to
the H&K VP9, and the Walther PPQ.
If the above companies can do it (and they have) then why
can't glock?
Some will, and have chimed in to say "use the reset".
I do use the reset but that doesn't discount the fact that
glock has a lousy trigger out of the box in comparison to the above
mentioned H&K, and Walther.
Yes, the mentioned alternatives cost more.
There's a reason for that,: better ergonomics, better trigger,
better quality, better guns, better period.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top