Glock Trigger Problems

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Tomass, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. Tomass

    Tomass

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    Hope this isn't a repost. The first was my very first post and it said it needed approval but it's nowhere to be found.

    My first Glock is my G17 and the long trigger is causing me to go off target. I'm pretty much low and left which I read is indicative of trigger pull problems. My problem is that my trigger finger has little cartilage left in the middle knuckle so the long pull kind of sucks. Will the Lone Wolf Trigger Connector help with this?

    Thanks.
     
  2. JBP55

    JBP55

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    Trigger time with an Instructor may be your best bet and you will not get rid of the long trigger pull with a connector change.
     

  3. MO Fugga

    MO Fugga Malt Liqra® Lifetime Member

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  4. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    Learn and practice the short trigger reset. It is only 1/8th inch of travel.

    1. After your first shot, release the trigger slowly until you feel and hear the click.

    2. Your pistol is now ready to fire again.

    Sounds simple, but it take practice to become automatic.
     
  5. Tomass

    Tomass

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    I don't need an instructor. I have been firing auto's for many years and have had Military Police training. I used to shoot darts with SA/DA auto's in the past before my injury.

    So the short connector won't help much, huh? Oh well, I'll just have to practice with and learn the Glock trigger.

    Thanks.
     
  6. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur CLM Millennium Member

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    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  7. Tomass

    Tomass

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    A hell of a lot longer than a cocked SA pull. :)

    Yeah, I am guilty of letting the trigger travel all the way forward before the next shot. A habit that's not as bad with SA pistols. I'll have to practice what Danny says. Thanks for the tips.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  8. shadow65

    shadow65

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    Fulcrum trigger was my answer.
     
  9. 8th ID

    8th ID

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    Tomass--

    Something that may help if you're looking for a better (lower wt.) trigger pull would be an aftermarket trigger kit. A lower pull wt. will help with accuracy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  10. garya1961

    garya1961

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    I have a NY1 trigger spring and a 3.5# connector and it works great for me. I am new to glocks(first post) but not new to guns. Mine came with the NY1 trigger spring and I added the 3.5# connector and a little polishing. I never fired a glock with an original trigger spring and connector so I can't compare but mine has a nice even trigger pull with a clean break. From what I've read it has about the same pull weight as a factory trigger but with a more even pull like a double action revolver.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  11. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

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    Danny and Butch, both, gave you exactly the right answer to this question. So, let's get into this a little bit more: First, it's not a, 'short connector'. It's a lighter one, instead. There are actually two basic trigger types you can have your Glock pistol set up with: One is an 8 to 10# pull, ‘New York’ (or, ‘Miami’) trigger. The NY-1 trigger duplicates the feel of using a double action revolver - One with an 8# pull. (There’s, also, an NY-2 trigger that weighs in at 10 to 12#’s, too.)

    The standard pretensioned striker, ‘Safe-Action’ trigger your Glock came with converts to an, 'NY trigger' that is most like a double action trigger pull. Now, while I’m able to appreciate that you’ve got a lot of pistol shooting experience, at the same time very little of that experience is with Glock pistols - Right! Low and left shooting is the most common problem that new Glock owners seem to have. Consequently, this question gets asked over and over again, here, every year. Happily, though, there are constructive ways to overcome this problem.

    Glock pistols don’t have a, ‘long trigger pull’. After you get used to shooting them the trigger pull is, actually, quite short. There is, however, a distinct difference between the first trigger pull and each subsequent pull, thereafter. Here’s how I do it: On the very first shot I, ‘prep the trigger’. I mentally divide the trigger pull into two stages. The first stage removes all the slack of, ‘pretravel’. Even when I’m shooting fast, I still tend to differentiate between Glock’s pretravel, and the actual striker, ‘let-off’ (sear break). I do this at the same time as I acquire the front sight.

    Of all the, ‘plastic pistols’ I’ve ever handled I can honestly tell you that Glock has the best trigger reset. I get to shoot them all; and compared to Glock all the rest seem either stiff or clumsy to me. When you’re learning how to control a Glock’s let-off point it’s best to begin by simply holding the trigger back after the shot goes off. Then, allow your trigger finger to BOUNCE forward by about an eighth of an inch. You should feel a slight, ‘click’. That click is the reset point you’re looking for. As soon as you hear it, your Glock is ready to fire the next shot. When you’re shooting really fast with a Glock it actually feels as if you’re, ‘tapping’ the trigger.

    There’s a number of different things you can do while working with snap caps; and learning Glock’s trigger reset point and exactly how to use it is one of them. I’ve been shooting pistols for almost 60 years; and, know what? I still practice with snap caps for, at least, 10 or 15 minutes everyday. Personally, I don’t think there’s any such thing as ever being so good with a pistol that you don’t need to regularly use snap caps. (Unless, of course, your family’s surname is, ‘Remington’ or, ‘Winchester’ - Then you can dispense with the snap caps and use the real thing!) ;)


    PS: In my experience Glock pistols do not work (or feel) all that well with a trigger of less than 3.5#'s pull weight. My own trigger pulls are all a clean breaking 4.9 to 5.2#'s; and that's the way I like them. (I'm getting a little arthritis in my hands, now, too; so I'm able to appreciate what you're saying about a sore finger.)

    I've been waiting for someone to suggest Glock's famous, '25 cent trigger job'. IMO, it's well worth doing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
  12. samurairabbi

    samurairabbi Dungeon Schmuck

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    Since you have cartilage problems in your trigger finger, you might consider using a different finger. Try using your middle finger instead of your forefinger. Many shooters, myself included, have had good luck with this switch.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  13. Tomass

    Tomass

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    You are correct, It's my first Glock as well as getting back into shooting regularly after some years with a new disability.

    My problem isn't that my finger gets sore. The problem is the long pull before the gun fires (vs hammer cocked on my other auto's). I cannot bend my index finger more than 30 degrees at the middle joint so my entire index finger is moving at the first knuckle, throwing my aim off.

    Also, it's funny you mention using my middle finger. I tried that last night dry firing at home, with my index finger along the frame. I was able to hold the sites on target better when the gun fired. That might just be the solution.

    In the end, you guys are correct. I just have to get used to the Glock trigger and my disability, and will practice holding it back after each shot and only let it travel forward at bit until it resets.

    Either way, I'll overcome the problem. I just thought the Lone Wolf connector or some other after market part would help.

    Thanks again.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  14. allegro

    allegro

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    This is a great graph. I am sure that we have all fallen into each of these categories in our lives. As much as we would like to believe that we have our shooting skills under control, the fact is that most of us do not.

    I use colored dots on my targets at the range. A different color for each mag I shoot. It is amazing (considering how many rounds I do shoot in a month) how my accuracy gets better the longer I stay at the range. Sight-picture and trigger control and where it is all at. PRACTICE
     
  15. TSAX

    TSAX USAF Vet

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    The trigger reset was taught to me in the military and Im glad I use it. I have been shooting more consistently every since.






    :50cal:
     
  16. MikeG36

    MikeG36 Have Gun Will Travel

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  17. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

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    Are you sure? (Because this is a huge part of what shooting is really all about.) ;)

    By the way, have you ever noticed how your point-of-impact can go off whenever you change to a different pistol.

    That hasn't been my experience! After a certain point, the longer I stay at the range the sloppier my shooting starts to become. A better idea is to go to the range often, stay there for about two hours and, then, go do something else. The best pistol shooting I've ever done in my entire life was while I was shooting up to 1,500 rounds a month and going to the range, like, every other day.

    In my experience it's frequent repetition - not endurance - that can significantly improve a person's skill with a pistol. Prolonged range sessions count for nothing. Frequent range practice is what really does it for ya.
     
  18. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    funny--your finger problems

    and you are low left

    the amazing thing is MANY new to Glock shooters

    do the same thing.

    The answer to their problems (that worked)

    is to dry fire a lot, not moving the sights while you do so.
     
  19. Tomass

    Tomass

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    Or, go back to a gun that fires single action. :tongueout:
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2012
  20. DTOM1776

    DTOM1776

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    +1 on learning the trigger reset.

    I also use a 3.5# connector in my range gun, though the heavier connectors may actually give you a better feel for the break point, especially with a limited range of motion or potential loss of sensitivity in your bang-digit.

    As an alternative to using your middle finger, you could also try shooting left-handed. It's good to train your support side regardless of injury.