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Glock Trigger Guard Modification

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by LZona, Oct 26, 2003.

  1. LZona

    LZona

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    For those of us who love our Glocks but hate the trigger guard hook the Robar Company will round off the trigger guard for $40.00. A very reasonable price but I hate sending a gun across the country if I can avoid it. Is this a job that I can do myself and does anyone have any experience in performing this type of frame modification?
     
  2. DaleGribble

    DaleGribble Sandwich!

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    I've never done it, and I don't like the look of it, but to each their own.

    I do remember a GT'er using a dremel and sanding wheel to do it. He sanded it down in small increments until he got the look he wanted.

    Do a search, I remember him posting several pictures of the finished job.
     

  3. cert-m/o

    cert-m/o

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    I did it on my model 26 and model 17. Completely changes the look of the gun. My amatuer job doesn't look pretty but is acceptable. Following instructions I obtained from this forum, I used a medium grit sanding drum with my dremmell, followed by extra fine grit sand paper. EASY.
     
  4. duckslayer79

    duckslayer79

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    Sounds like a good idea to spice up the look but what about the fit in the holsters. All Glock holsters have a squared trigger guard. Would it still fit? Just curious.

    Take Care
    Richard
     
  5. ERASER

    ERASER Nyuk,Nyuk,Nyuk!

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    I used some power tools and rounded off the trigger-guard, got rid of that "hump" near the rear of the trigger-guard, removed more material where the trigger-guard and the front of the grip meet. I also beveled the trigger-guard at about a 45 degree angle near where it meets the grip. Being left-handed, the corner of the mag. release would "bite" the knuckle on my middle finger, so I also "rounded off" that corner. The rest of the mag. release is untouched.


    As for how I rounded off the front of the trigger guard, I wrapped the slide in a "holster" made of typing paper. I took two wood strips, covered them in duct tape and put the pistol in between them and clamped it upside down in a bench vise. I actually used a belt sander to CAREFULLY remove MOST of the material (though I did slightly sand a mark on the serial number plate----it's still very legible). I used the area of the belt sander between the flat plate and the front roller. This allowed the belt to arch around the trigger-guard and "round" the area. Another reason I started with the belt sander instead of, say, a Dremel, is that the wide beltsander allowed for better visual accuracy that I wasn't sanding too much off of the left or right side....and it removed material uniformly side-to-side. The belt sander also was easier to use two hands on and the slower speed allowed for better control. After using the belt sander, I did a little work with a file but found that sandpaper wrapped around a 2" x 2" x 1/4" piece of aluminum actually worked better. The sandpaper allowed for removal of material in the push and pull strokes without leaving the unsightly marks that a file can leave. The small metal block was rigid enough not to flex (thereby maintaining straight and flat sanding) and just the right size to hold in BOTH hands, yet not get in the way of the pistol. I just ran the block from the bottom of the triggerguard, around the nose, and up to the dustcover area. Following the arc started by the belt sander I continued to remove material until the outside curve matched the inside curve of the trigger-guard (CHECK FREQUENTLY WITH A PAIR OF CALIPERS if you can). After getting close to the proper thickness.....I repeated the process with finer and finer grits of Wet-Or-Dry.
    The "hump" near the rear of the trigger-guard got the same treatment.
    In addition, I removed more material in the area where the trigger-guard and the front strap meets. To do this, I took a wooden dowel (about 8" long) of appropriate thickness. I took a 3" by 3" piece of sandpaper and taped one edge of the sandpaper to the dowel. I simply wrapped the rest of the sandpaper around the dowel and taped JUST THE CORNERS OF THE SANDPAPER TO THE DOWEL. I don't want the tape to contact the pistol. Make sure that you have the drill turn in a direction that goes in the opposite direction of the way you wrapped the paper (so the drilling action is trying to wind the paper tighter).
    Next, I took another of those aluminum blocks, bent it slightly. With the pistol still clamped upside down lay the dowel FLAT in the area to be sanded. I had the weight of the drill on on side, and I used the bent metal block to put slight downward pressure on the other side. The block also allowed me to minimize the tendency of the dowel to try to run off in the direction I was sanding. Lay the dowel flat and then SLOWLY start the drill. Repeat with the other grits of paper.
    I also beveled this area. I simply took the drill and dowel, held them at a 45 degree angle (or thereabouts) and turned on the drill. After beveling the area where the trigger-guard and the frontstrap meet, I kept sanding as I moved forward towards where that "hump" used to be. I then repeated this on the other side. Lightly hand sand to "round over" the edges. Repeat with the other grits of paper.
    Sanding these two areas made it much more comfortable on the knuckle of my middle finger. It rides up a little higher on the front of the grip and the beveling eliminates that sharp edge of the original configuration.
    Being left-handed, the mag release was also uncomfortable, so I rounded off the lower left corner with a small file and some sandpaper.
    I put a buffing wheel in my drill and LIGHTLY buffed the finished product.
    For a while I toyed with the idea of attempting to "restipple" the areas, but I really like the smooth finish now.

    Sorry for the long length, but I tried to be as specific as I could.
    If anyone has any improvements over my methods, please let me know.

    Thanks


    p.s.: The trigger-guard modification has NO effect on carrying in my Sidearmor IWB.
     
  6. ghostwn

    ghostwn Ghost Member

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    Good job and looks good...^c
     
  7. ERASER

    ERASER Nyuk,Nyuk,Nyuk!

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    Thanks.
    I was more than a bit hesitant to try it but a lot of other GTers provided plenty of ideas and suggestions. I really like how the pistol feels now.