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glock storage

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by moonshot, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. moonshot

    moonshot

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    Hello all,

    This is my first post to the gunsmithing section. I hope someone can answer some questions of mine.

    I am thinking of putting a few unused Glocks into long term storage. Not buried in the back yard, just placed in "house" storage. The house in question, however, will not be my own. I need these to remain safe from environmental conditions (ie rust) for at least ten years. I can pretty well ensure they will be safe from theft, but I can't guarantee they will be kept in a dry and temperature controlled condition.

    Do I completely detail strip or leave assembled?

    Do I coat all metal with RIG, just the slide & barrel, or do nothing but coat with a good lube/preserver (such as Breakfree CLP or LP)?

    Do I store in the original tupperware box, or use something like a VCI treated storage bag?

    Any thoughts will be appreciated.

    moonshot
     
  2. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

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    I won't bother asking why...

    I'd completely disassemble and coat individual parts liberally with cosmoline (and I mean liberally). Put each piece in a bag, double or tripple up the outer bag, perhaps with a non-permeable type bag (or can it?). Then forget about it.
     

  3. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto

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    RIG grease everything inside and out. I wouldn't worry about taking apart the gun beyond the regular "field-strip" though.

    Then I'd put the gun inside a home made PVC pipe with some silicon moisture absorbant stuff. close up the PVC pipe by not air tight. Leave the gun and the absorbant in the PVC for about 2 weeks and in a dry environment.

    AFter two weeks, open the PVC pipe, remove the absorbant material and immediately seal up the pipe with the PVC glue stuff one uses for sprinklers etc....

    I think your gun would be fine for 10 years.

    Second option, just do what the Military has done since WWI....cover in cosmoline or RIG and put it in a card board box. Store it in a dry location and it should be good until WW III.........
     
  4. anyplainjoe

    anyplainjoe Nobody special.

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    I think when you open the previously dehumidified pipe, you're instantly back to square one regarding the humidity.

    Is cosmoline and other storage greases compatible with the frame?
     
  5. moonshot

    moonshot

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    For those who wish to know...

    I am asking the question because Glocks are inexpensive enough to own several. I am in the process of buying several more, to add to those I already have. My intention is to have firearms available to leave (or hopefully give) to my children at some time in the future when they would have reached the age to legally own them, and have also shown the maturity and skill to be responsible gun owners.

    I do not know if this will actually happen, but I wish to have the option.

    As for not keeping the extra firearms at my home, that is for security reasons. I don't wish to have all my eggs in one basket. By storing them in various locations (homes of family, safety deposit box, etc), I can better protect against loss by fire or theft.

    As for RIG, what will that do over time to the frame? If I just field strip the gun, what about those metal parts (striker, various springs, trigger bar, etc) which I do not completely protect?

    One idea I had (don't know if it is a good one or not) was to completely detail strip the gun and place the parts (all except magazine tube and frame) in a tupperware contailer filled with Breakfree LP storage solution. Completely cover all parts, and seal the tupperware top in place after adding enough LP to remove as much space as possible. The parts would now be sitting in a bath of Breakfree, with no exposure to air. I could replace the tupperware with a PVC pipe and do the same thing.

    Any opinions on this idea?

    moonshot
     
  6. anyplainjoe

    anyplainjoe Nobody special.

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    That seems overly complex. Just detail strip the gun, spray a long term oil such as Sheath or spread Cosmo on the metal parts and you done.

    Can a person even buy the old school cosmoline nowadays?
     
  7. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto

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    I agree with the last post that submerging it in CLP is a mess and unnecessary.

    Just put RIG all over it and it will be fine. Unless you plan on storing it in the shower or a wet basement, it's not going to rust.
     
  8. moonshot

    moonshot

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    I am a little confused...

    Why would immersing my slide, barrel and various metal parts in a container of Breakfree be messier than coating them with RIG or Cosmoline?

    With the CLP (or LP), all I need do to make ready for use is wipe down each effected part with a silicone rag. If coated with RIG or Cosmo, isn't cleaning a lot harder?

    Whether I detail strip or leave whole, I would think Breakfree would still be easier to remove than RIG or Cosmo.

    As for this method not being necessary, I don't know. I would rather be overly cautious than overly complacent.

    moonshot
     
  9. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto

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    moonshot.....

    You make a good point on your last message here. However, It's just my personal opinion that if you soak it in CLP or LP, it' gonna drip like honey. What type of container are you then going to keep the gun in? With a liquid like CLP, that stuff seeps all over the place. If you store it in a tuperware container, it's gonna be messy as well. NOt only messy, but CLP sererates after time. The PTFE or whatever that solid is in the solution, setles to the bottom of the bottle and the solvent is left on top. That's what will happen to your gun in long term storage as well.

    Now, if you use LP, you won't have that problem, but the oil will run down off the gun after time. Have you ever seen the inside of an internal combustion engine that has sat for long periods of time? Many time, the inside of the engine gets red rust even though at one time a heavy coating of oil was coated on the internal parts of the engine.

    The reason why armorors from around the world use grease is that it won't seep and stays put wherever you put it. (provided the temperature remains generally under 110F.

    If you're going to store the weapon for a long period of time, what does it matter about taking a little extra time to clean the RIG grease off of the gun? Your concern shouldn't be, "geeze, it's going to take me a long time to clean the gun when i get it out of storage after 10 years."

    Your concern should actually be, "I hope my gun hasn't rusted after 10 years of storage."

    The U.S. military has stored guns now for well over 50 years with cosmoline (heavy grease) on some prized firearms. It works, stick with what works. LP or any liquid oil is a "liquid." Liquid all follow down due to gravity. Eventually liquid oil (CLP or LP) will run off the gun after a long time of storage.

    Just my own opinion.
     
  10. moonshot

    moonshot

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    10mmauto,

    You make some very good points - points I hadn't considered. I wasn't too worried about the LP running off the parts due to gravity as I had envisioned storing the parts immersed in LP. Picture a fish in a tank of water, with the gun parts being the fish.

    What I hadn't considered was the breakdown, or separation, of the LP components over time.

    My initial reason for not just using RIG was my uncertainty of how to coat all the little metal parts (firing pin safety spring, etc) as well as the INSIDE of things not easily reached and checked (barrel, firing pin channel, etc).

    Following treatment with RIG, how do I store the parts? Wrapped in what? Thanks.

    moonshot
     
  11. CCV

    CCV Millennium Member

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    CLP and zip lock freezer bags work great.
     
  12. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto

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    I guess zip locks would work well, however plastic bags are actually a porous material. Remember high school chemistry classes with water passing through plastic sandwhich bags and trash bags??? I don't know how long plastic zip lock bags would contain the petroleum LP product over time.

    I'd consider using somthing thick. Perhaps go to a Home Depot store and purchase some thich PVC pipe with an enormous diameter to store the gun.

    Use caps at each end sealed with the PVC glue (the purple stuff you use to assemble lawn sprinkler PVC pipe) after you've treated the metal gun parts with your oil/grease stuff.

    I'm guessing that would probably last you 100 years. The military just stored the firearms treated with cosmoline and wax paper. Then the firearms were placed in cardboard or wooden boxes in a dry area (indoors).
     
  13. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

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    I think 100 years exceeds the half life of the Glock polymer.
     
  14. Brass Nazi

    Brass Nazi NO BRASS FOR U!

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    The Glock polymer's halflife exceeds my halflife.
    So who cares?
     
  15. moonshot

    moonshot

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    RIG on the metal surfaces sounds like the way to go. I know how to completely detail strip the gun, and I'll get the slide and barrel, at least.

    Should I also use RIG on the other metal parts (firing pin, springs, locking block, trigger bar, etc)? Do they have any steel in them, or are they non-rusting (like aluminum)?

    I know I should treat the frame rails, but will RIG damage the polymer frame?

    If the frame does have a limited shelf-life, say less than 50 years, I can see myself buying an aluminum Glock frame, as recently advertised on CCFRACEFRAMES.COM

    I prefer the polymer, but not if it will decompose over a relatively short period of time. An aluminum frame would at least make a viable backup, to go along with my other spare parts.

    After all is treated, wax paper followed by, maybe duct tap(?) for placement into a container. If placed into an unknown environment - I'll use PVC. If placed into a secure environment - it probable doesn't matter.

    Thanks to all for good advise, critiques, and observations.

    moonshot
     
  16. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto

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    Use RIG on all metal surfaces. You won't hurt a thing. Springs, firing pins are all metal and they can rust.

    With Aluminum, it does after time get an oxidized surface which eventually pits over time. Generally aluminum is "anodized" which greatly reduces corrosion of the surface. Since anodizing is out of the question and completely impractical for what you want done, just put RIG on aluminum as well.

    Answer: No, it won't damage the polymer frame.

    My own personal opinion: Sales gimmick. Stick with the Glock polymer. Besides, 50 years from now you'll probably be in a wheel chair or in a hospital bed hooked up to a machine just barely able to lift up the T.V. remote. You won't even care about what condition your Glock is in because your kids will own it by then. Your only concern (and mine also) will be the druel running down your mouth.
    :banana:

    Duct tape???? If you add a pair of high-heels and a ball-gag to that equation, you'd have enough props for a Quinten Tarantino movie!!! Honestly, forget the duct tape. Go with wax paper into a card board box, or the original PVC sealed pipe is best. You could have one end threaded and sealed up with the yellow plumbers tap. Avoid the white colored one. The yellow is used on natural gas pipes and holds up better to the elements. With the threaded PVC, you could open it up once in a while instead of using a hack-saw.
     
  17. HiredGun77

    HiredGun77

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    Why not just put the factory sealed tupperware into a Pelican case and forget about it? Put a handful of desiccant and oxygen absorbing packets in the box and this would easily be a 200 year time capsule. I wouldn't spray it with anything as over long term it may interact with the Glock plastic. Store the Pelican case in a cool dry place like under your bed or in the bottom of a seldom used closet. If you wanted to be fanatical you would change the desiccant and oxygen packets every 5 to 10 years. In 200 years someone could open this up and at most the springs will have relaxed a bit.

    Another good place for long term storage would be to put a factory sealed pistol into a bank safe deposit box. They have a controlled atmosphere and is a secure as it gets. I doubt the police would even think to look there if they had a national roundup. Buried on your property is old hat and they would find those in no time. The metal detectors the military uses can sniff those right out.
     
  18. Buckloco

    Buckloco

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    Yes Cosmoline is still available.:thumbsup:
     
  19. hodrige

    hodrige

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    Problem with Tupperware is that petroleum products would corode it so be careful what material you use. I would detail strip them and separate the metal components from the polymer and store the metal parts in a jar of Vaseline. Heat the Vaseline to liquefy it first, and make sure you remove the firing pin channel liner first (buy a new one).
    H.
     
  20. NMPOPS

    NMPOPS

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    My department had a Glock 22 stored in the evidence room for 14 years. It was recoved, buried in the backyard where a shooting had occurred. When recovered, the slide was locked back and placed cardboard box along with the partially loaded mag (9 rounds). When we legally converted it to department use, all it needed was a new recoil spring. No rust was visible anywhere! Tenifer must work. By the way it was buried for 2 weeks before we recoved it and the sand was left on it while on storage.