close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Glock slide releases on reload...

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by ddesilva, May 13, 2006.

  1. ddesilva

    ddesilva

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    I have a Glock 23 that releases from slide lock when I do a firm reload...is this normal? Only mod is an aftermarket 3.5 pound trigger connector...

    Thanks
     
  2. Sikhed

    Sikhed cat-herder

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2006
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Sounds like the slide lock's inside tab is bent, or too far inward.
     

  3. ddesilva

    ddesilva

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    Any way I can fix this myself? Concern of long term damage if left alone...?

    thanks
     
  4. State Man G35

    State Man G35

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    with my old department, we were issued G 22's. mine did that and I saw it as an asset - don't have to worry about hitting the slide release or manually pulling back the slide - just jam it in and go.
     
  5. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2001
    Messages:
    4,457
    Likes Received:
    150
    Location:
    Alabama
  6. BustedFlush

    BustedFlush Springy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Florida
    Yep, I was the one that started that thread over in General Glocking. My G19 is completely stock and it does it. My other Glocks do not. I respect the opinions of RandySmith and others who said it is normal, just don't plan on it happening. Always practice releasing the slide, whether you were trained to use the slide stop lever or to pull rearwards on the slide. Apparently it is more likely to happen with muzzle pointing a bit upward, which I suppose makes it easier for the slide to move backwards slightly since backwards is slightly downward.

    BF :cool:
     
  7. Skpotamus

    Skpotamus

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2003
    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Terre Haute, IN
    My local sheriffs dept trains with the slap and drop feature. They still make everyone use the slingshot slide release method, but they actually work on slamming the magazine in to drop the slide. Their glock 22's will do it on every reload if you put the mag in firmly and quickly.

    I've found that it works better with the larger frame guns (22, 21, 17 etc). I can only get my 19 to do it sometimes, and have never gotten my 26 or 30 to do it.

    Train to do rack the slide and if you get the slide to slam shut without your hand hitting it, you can shoot a little quicker. But don't plan on it happening.
     
  8. ruf

    ruf

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    The longer slides use longer/softer the recoil springs. This results in less pressure on the slide stop and hence more "accidental" slide releases.

    On a side note, there is a competition technique which involves resting your shooting thumb on top of the slide stop while slamming the magazine home. The added weight of your thumb will consistently release the slide, but practice is required to perfect the timing/form to insure that you don't close the slide on an empty chamber. There should be no conscious downward pressure from the thumb, or you will run the risk of closing the slide too early.
     
  9. NISMOTom

    NISMOTom

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Most Glocks of all frame sizes and calibers will do this...

    however as others have stated, I wouldn't count on it. I trained myself to do it in my "younger" days (I'm still pretty young) and learned quickly that it wasn't reliable enough to come close for a combat technique.

    I still use the "Uzi" indexing technique and count on racking the slide with an "over the top" technique.
     
  10. 10mm4ever

    10mm4ever 10mm Pusher

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    917
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sw,Ohio
    The return spring on the slide release/stop is a very "chincy" piece of metal that looks more like a bent paperclip. That's more than likely the problem.
     
  11. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Messages:
    46,654
    Likes Received:
    17,324
    Location:
    Kentucky
    I've never actually met anybody that considered this a "problem." In fact, I've seen more people complain because their new Glock DIDN'T drop the slide when they seated a magazine. One of the benefits of slapping that mag home, besides p[ositive seating, is that you can drop the slide in the same step and save yourself a tenth or 2.
     
  12. VN350X10

    VN350X10

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2001
    Messages:
    6,536
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    McHenry, IL
    Both of my G20's & my G21 do it about 99% of the time, especially with full capacity mags. Only about 85% with the 10 rd crimebillcrap. Think of it as hitting the bottom of the frame with a dead blow hammer. The inertia of the slide stop wants it to stay at rest, while the frame is being moved by the "hammer". Since the frame moves "up" as the slide stop stays put, it releases.
    My smaller frame pistols don't do it, so I still rely on the slingshot, even for competition.



    uncle albert
     
  13. JandDSC

    JandDSC

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancaster, SC
    Most full size Glocks will do this but Glock does not recommend relying on this method stating they cannot guarantee a round will chamber when using this method hence leaving the shooter feeling he has a loaded weapon when in reality a round failed to chamber. I personally use the release method but have had the slide release when slamming the mag home and have yet to have a failure to feed when it did release.