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Glock Slide Refinishing at Home

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by glock36A1, Jan 16, 2005.

  1. glock36A1

    glock36A1

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    I was wondering if anyone has experience with the spray paint from Brownells?
    They have air-cure and bake-on types available, my concern with the bake-on type is putting the slide in the oven at 350 degrees, I didn't want to remove my channel liner if the bake-on doesn't make much difference.

    Thanks!

    Randy
     
  2. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    Remove the channel liner and the sights.
     

  3. glock36A1

    glock36A1

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    Thanks Walter!

    I was just testing the waters to see if doing it myself is a good idea.
    It could be a good winter project here in Pennsylvania.

    Randy
     
  4. tangodown

    tangodown

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    I have used several of Brownells finishes on rifles with good results but was not real impressed when I tried it on a kel-tec slide.

    The AlumahydeII is the most solvent resistant I have found and is my choice for metal and stock work (as advertised it will get harder for a full 5 days so be patient). The teflon/moly is the best of the bake on and will provide a thinner finish with less buildup. I used the teflon/moly on the blued parts of my Dillon press (lots of humidity in the garage and had some rust problems) and it has been durable with no chipping or corrosion.

    Most of the economical products will provide sufficient adhesion on rounded corners and flats but may be prone to chipping on the sharp edges. Most of the Brownell finishes are soft enough that holster wear (either suede or kydex) will be a major issue. I would not attempt to apply any of the sray on finishes to internal parts.

    The next step up on the DIYS finishes would be cerakote applied with an airbrush. Huge difference in hardness and resistance to chipping but a bit more sensitive in application. If applied correctly the hardness and holster wear is comparible to anodizing. For more general info on cerakote check out www.fit4duty.us

    Regardless of the product used proper prepping of the metal will determine the overall success or failure.
     
  5. cpirtle

    cpirtle

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    Interesting coincedence. I just melted a P3AT and used baking laquer and it was terrible.

    I had used it before on a 1911 and was also not happy but mainly because it had a tendancy to chip. On the KT it was literally flaking off.

    The best DIY finish I have found is Oxpho-Blue from Brownells. If you don't mind a deep blued finish I would highly reccomend it.

    Most other cold blue comes off fairly easy, especially with steel wool. To polish up Oxpho you actually use #0000 steel wool and it just gets brighter and deeper. Extremely scratch and wear resistant.

    It's what I ended up finishing the KT with and it looks fantastic. (I have some pics but they're at home and can be posted this evening if you're interested.)