Glock plates set up

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by latham44, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. latham44

    latham44 Saint Boondock

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    Does anyone know what the mechanism is that they use on the plates at GSSF? The part I'm talking about is after someone shoots there is a rope that pulls all the plates up. I'm wondering what the rope is connected to.

    I'm interested in building a plate "rack" and just wondering if that mechanism is an option.

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Ghost361

    Ghost361

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    Go to www.mgmtargets.com and you should be able to get a good look. The rope is connected to a bar that raises all the plates at once. When they fall they rest across this bar.
     

  3. ede

    ede

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    it's pretty simple and even if you had no idea what one looked like you ought to be able to figure it out if you can build the rack. i built one and if a dumbass like me can figure it out just about anyone ought to be able to.
     
  4. latham44

    latham44 Saint Boondock

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    Ede, what is the thickness of the steel plates you used? I planned on using 1/4" thick and 8" round.
     
  5. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    Not sure what Ed used for thickness, but 8" is the correct diameter. Depends on the range (who typically provide the racks) but I think most are 14" center to center. Exception might be Hallsville; seem to recall their plates are slightly further apart, possibly 'cause they use a different spacing for the Bianchi Cup(?).

    Reminds me to see about getting a couple plates welded...

    :patriot:
     
  6. ede

    ede

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    my original plan was to use 3/8 AR but couldn't get AR so i went with 1/2 A36
     
  7. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    Thanks; I thought 1/4" was kinda slim. My favorite diner has 1/4" pancakes but their hardness is way too low. :supergrin:

    Is yours setup 6" edge to edge (14" centers)?
    :)
     
  8. ede

    ede

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  9. latham44

    latham44 Saint Boondock

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    Thanks for all the help everyone.


    ***Dumb Question ALERT***

    Will the 115 gr. WWB in 9mm have trouble knocking over a 1/2" plate?
     
  10. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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    That sounds like a speed rack, not a Bianchi/GSSF rack. The plates are, if I remember correctly 20" on center.
     
  11. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    Jerry, I know some of 'em - MO for sure - use a Bianchi rack. In your experience, what's found at most ranges that host GSSF matches? I've been too busy trying to knock 'em down to measure 'em, but have seen both.

    Attached is #1 son at Oakdale 2 years ago when they had the plates where they now shoot the 'M'. That be a speed rack I think; which is what they own.
     
  12. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    And looks like the wider rack, buddy Loran shooting at Lexington in '05.

    Don't know which one's more prevalent...

    :patriot:
     
  13. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    the better racks have the reset arm down so that the rope runs along the ground.

    If the reset arm is up the bullet splatter will cut the rope.

    Also think about the angle of the plates in relation to where the splatter goes.
     
  14. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    :thumbsup: Good advice from lethal. I had a good time at the last match while waiting in shaded grass at the M, well uprange, shagging "fly balls" off the poppers.
    Lots of fun; grass & no infield-fly rule. And much safer than line-drives coming straight back. :supergrin:

    :patriot:
     
  15. Don At PC

    Don At PC Senior Member Millennium Member

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    Do I hear a "Cubby" out there? :rofl: :tongueout: :supergrin: :thumbsup: :wavey:
     
  16. ede

    ede

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    making the reset arm work from the low position is a lot more effort and from what i've seen i'm not sure it offers much of an advantage other than not cutting the line with splatter. i got to thinking and i'm not sure what my C-C is. if i ever have some free time i'll have to measure it.
     
  17. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    The glove still goes to the game. :thumbsup:
     
  18. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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    Most that I attend, if not all use the Bianchi/GSSF version. I'm down where Scott and company show up with the trailer so we have GSSF's plates at the matches.
     
  19. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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    True and I've seen rope and cable cut by splatter. But the low offers the best chance of not cutting them. I've seen the Florida boys rack go down because of splatter and the last time I shot with Bobby the cable clevis succumbed to splatter.
     
  20. Norske

    Norske Millennium Member

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    Most plates are 3/8". You can make them out of 1/2"; your "lean" mechanism just has to lean them back further is all. 1/4" would be great for .22's but would not stand up to centerfire handgun rounds for long unless it were some really exotic, and probably expensive, armor steel.

    The plates on cheap racks simply weld a pipe to the bottom of the plate. It is very difficult to install a proper "lean" adjustment mechanism to such racks.

    The plates on better racks bolt or weld the plate to one side of a piece of angle iron, and the pipe is welded to the other edge of the angle iron, forming something like an "L" shape. That way, your Lean adjustment bolt can run vertically under the bottom of the angle iron and is completely protected from bullet splatter.

    The reset mechanism on cheap racks will usually consist of a rotating piece of pipe with "fingers" sticking out that reset the plates as the pipe is turned. The problem with this is that plates striking the "fingers" will transmit the shock to other plates and they may go down as well without being hit.

    The better racks, including MGM and those used by GSSF, have two arms, pivoted at each end, with a pipe or bar running between them from one end of the rack to the other. The shock of plates hitting the reset bar is transmitted to the ends of the rack and absorbed rather than knocking other plates over.

    MGM uses a complicated set of articulated arms and joints to operate the reset bar from below the rack so the reset rope runs along the ground. The GSSF racks just use a simpler single strap-iron arm up and to one side so the rope is elevated. Both work well.

    On the MGM racks, the front plate below the plates is angled back so the fragments of bullets that hit it are primarily directed towards the ground behind the rack. The front plate on the GSSF racks is vertical, so frags can go to the side and cut the reset rope.

    However, all it takes to fix this is about 6 feet of 1/8" cable at the plate rack end, just like a fishing leader. A direct bullet strike will cut 1/8" steel cable, but bullet frags will NOT cut 1/8" steel cable. You can take my word for that, but if you don't believe it, just use heavier steel cable. The difference is just pennies.

    The cable can then be tied to any sort of rope; even cotton clothesline will do but 1/4" Nylon rope works best. This sort of cable/rope combination is essentially fragment-proof and will last for years.

    MGM makes both full size "Bianchi" (20" C to C) AND "Speed" (14" C to C) racks. GSSF's racks are full sized "Bianchi" racks.

    You will encounter either one at GSSF matches; whatever is available to the clubs hosting the match.

    That (5 x 6" ='s) 30"s of steel-between-plates difference amounts to a LOT of heavy and expensive steel. "Speed" racks are less expensive and are about 2/3's the size, 2/3's the weight, and generally just 2/3's the hassle of full size "Bianchi" racks.

    If I were you, I would built or acquire a "Speed" rack as opposed to a "Bianchi" rack.

    Most racks are emplaced directly in front of a range impact berm. Run-off from such berms is such that there is usually an "apron" of dirt at the base of the berm. Most racks are built to stand on LEVEL ground. When you then place the rack on this angled "apron", the rack is essentially leaning forward and this exposes your reset bar to direct bullet strikes. To fix this, the "hard way" is to dig the rear legs into the ground. An easier way is to use "shims" made of short pieces of 2x4 or 4x4 under the front legs to level up the whole rack. You never want to be able to see the reset bar from the shooting position.

    FWIW.

    :)