Glock Numbers (Gun ID)?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by rangerhgm, Sep 2, 2015.

  1. rangerhgm

    rangerhgm NRA Member

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    Is their a reason for how Glock guns are numbered?

    Other than the 9mm which I use and am most familiar with, I have a heck of a time remembering the other gun numbers.

    Most of the time when some mentions a Gxx in a post I have to go to the Glock site and look at the table to see which gun they are talking about.
     
  2. Rusty Guns

    Rusty Guns

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    The numbering system is kind of random.
    The first pistol they made is the g-17 next 18 full auto, 19, smaller, and so it go's. As far as I can determine no way to keep up with them.
    Try and keep up or like me keep a cheat sheet handy.
    I can remember about half of them.
    Good Luck.
     

  3. KenMI

    KenMI

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    Better that way than other companies that use the same name for several calibers or variations. At least if someone says Glock 19, it is one caliber and barrel length (of course, could be one of 4 main generation variants). If someone says XDS, it doesn't mean anything specific.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2015
  4. Bello

    Bello America/Italia

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    The numbers Glock uses I believe is the patent number
     
  5. Jack Hays

    Jack Hays

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    It began with the idea that the original Glock 17 was Glock's 17th patent (not guns only). Next numberswise was the modified "long slide" 17L. Afterwards, it appears to have simply been the order that the new guns have been introduced, or at least announced, no matter which model was sold first (So 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and so forth).
     
  6. rangerhgm

    rangerhgm NRA Member

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    makes sense......just makes it hard to keep track of which one is which....cal etc
     
  7. GoFasterrrr

    GoFasterrrr

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    Try Sig and the P320 series. In 2014 their Carry model is now the 2015 Compact model and if you don't watch when buying one the gun shops will sell you a Compact when you were actually wanting a Carry model.
    And the 9mm, .40 and 357 all are interchangeable
     
  8. Patchman

    Patchman Florist

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    In German, Glock's numbering system makes perfect sense. Translated to Amerikan, not so much. :whistling:
     
  9. bobtheelf

    bobtheelf

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    Simply the order they were released.
     
  10. BlueBacker

    BlueBacker

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    I found this online somewhere a while back. It was before the more recent models though.







    The model number has nothing to do with capacity and everything to do with the product number produced by Glock. The Glock 17 was the 17th product patented by the Glock corporation. It stands to reason that the rest of them are also product model numbers in the chronological order in which they were introduced to market.

    The numbers are not random. First, there were other Glock plastic products, including shovels and knives. The 17 was the first PISTOL in the Glock line, followed by a longslide version (The 17L) and then a fully automatic version (The Glock 18). Then they perfected a smaller version, a compact, which they called the 19.

    Then they made a larger frame to accommodate the 10mm and .45. These they called the 20 and 21.

    Then .40 S&W became all the rage, and the 22 and 23 came out. Then of course someone wanted a longslide version in .40, the counterpart to the 17L, which became the Glock 24.

    The Glock 25 was designed and marketed to countries where civilians were prohibited from owning military-caliber or police-caliber firearms. Because the United States was not one of those, it was never marketed here. The Glock 25 is a .380 pistol the size of the Glock 19, and is very popular in South America.

    Then subcompacts became all the rage, and Glock came out with their 9mm and .40 subcompacts, the 26 (9mm) and 27 (.40). And after this the "Glock 25" countries got their own subcompact, the Glock 28.

    Then Glock perfected the subcompacts for 10mm and .45 again, making the 29 and 30.

    Then the .357 Sig became the new latest greatest thing, so Glock made this caliber in three sizes: The Glock 31 (Full size), the Glock 32 (Compact) and the Glock 33 (Subcompact).

    Then, somewhere along the way, they discontinued the 17L, but people wanted a practical tactical pistol, with all the features of the 17L in a duty carry package. So they made these in 9mm and .40, and called them the 34 and 35.

    Then some bright boy at Glock considered that the .45acp was an awfully fat cartridge and someone might want a single-stack compact .45 Glock for concealed carry. And along came the Glock 36.

    And then Gaston decided that there was a marketing niche for a 17-sized .45, but the length of the .45acp cartridge was a bit on the long side. And since powder technology (starting with Vihtavuori Oy) had advanced to the point where the .45acp casing could be optimized with slightly greater pressure but delivering the same velocites with the .45 casing shortened to a 9mm length, the .45GAP (Glock Auto Pistol) cartridge was born, and Glock immediateliy produced its standard set of three firearms in this new cartridge, thus creating the Glock 37 (Full size) Glock 38 (Compact) and Glock 39 (Subcompact) respectively.

    So really, the Glock model numbers are in chronological order and indicate the production directions of the times.

    THAT's how they came up with the names for their pistols.
     
    mcbridebr likes this.
  11. rangerhgm

    rangerhgm NRA Member

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    Very interesting.....thx for posting that