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Glock newb customization

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by dunk11, May 20, 2004.

  1. dunk11

    dunk11

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    Ok guys, I just got old enough to get my first gun and I went with a Glock 23. Woo-hoo! I found this awesome forum a little while ago and have been reading all of ya'lls posts trying to get a better understanding for these guns. This is my first gun and I have pretty much no experience with pistols, so I figured I would ask you guys (the experts) a quick question. Is there any point to do any modification for a person who just bought his first gun? I have been reading all the stuff you guys have done and I can't follow one bit, but I was wondering about the more simple modifications. Maybe a different grip or change the barrel, I don't know. So if you guys have any suggestions please let me know. Also remember I don't know all the technical names for any parts, so please make it so any moron can figure it out. Also, if you don't think I should do anything just tell me to leave it alone.

    Thanks fellas.
     
  2. gary newport

    gary newport

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    First suggestion: leave it alone and buy lots of ammo! Second suggestion: after shooting up all that ammo, consider night sights (Mepros, Trijicon, etc.). For other ideas, just check around this forum.
     

  3. Custom Glock Racing

    Custom Glock Racing I did it first. Millennium Member

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    Yes, people at all levels can benifit from good sights and triggers.
     
  4. gary newport

    gary newport

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    Matt very correctly points out that even beginners can benefit from sight and trigger enhancement. However, the factory Glock sights are at least adequate for daytime shooting at ten or fifteen yards, and the standard Glock trigger pull is at least adequate. Many folks happily shoot their Glocks just as they come from the box. Others (like me) look for modest enhancements to what is already a very shootable pistol. Still others go wild and add stuff or replace virtually everything but the slide and frame. (Actually, some even replace the slide with an aftermarket one from Caspian!)

    To me, it just doesn't make sense for a new shooter to spend a lot of money on "enhancing" his new gun until he has shot it enough to form an opinion about what he likes and dislikes. Some (many?) experienced shooters have spent good money on bad "enhancements", and a new shooter is perhaps more likely to fall into the Aftermarket Black Hole.

    Having said all that, the two things Matt mentioned are top candidates for enhancement.

    Sights: night sights are nearly indespensible if your pistol is to be used for self-defense. Most of the major brands (Matt likes--and sells--Heine sights) will give you a cleaner, easier-to-use sight picture than the stock plastic ones in bright or dim light. Glock will install factory steel night sights on you pistol for something like $58.00, or you can install other aftermarket sights yourself without much difficulty. If you just want a better daytime sight picture, there are aftermarket sights that will give you that, including versions with fiber optic inserts that will sort of glow in daylight.

    Trigger: most folks seem to shoot better with triggers that are lighter--that require less force to pull. Out of the box, your G23 probably has a trigger pull of about six pounds or so. A relatively simple way to get a lighter pull on a standard Glock is to change the Connector (Don't worry too much about what a connector is, just yet.) Yours will likely have what is known as the "5 1/2 pound" connector. Glock puts a "3 1/2 pound" connector in their "target" pistols, the G34 and G35, giving those guns a trigger pull of about 4 1/2 pounds or so. That connector can be installed in your gun for a similar reduction in trigger pull weight. (By the way, some folks want a heavier trigger pull and so there are Trigger Springs that require more effort. These are known as "New York" trigger springs.)

    Another possible trigger enhancement is to the actual trigger--the thingy you have to put your finger on. Full-size Glocks have a smooth-faced trigger, while compact (such as the G23) and subcompact Glocks have a so-called "target" trigger with vertical serrations. Some folks don't like the serrated triggers and replace them with smooth versions for the equivalent full-size Glock. (The smooth trigger for a G22 will fit your G23.)

    Mostly, though, shoot your pistol and find out what you DON'T like before buying what you MIGHT like!
     
  5. dunk11

    dunk11

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    Thanks for the replies guys. I think I might get some night sights, but we will see. I am going to Gunsite in 3 weeks so I am sure I will learn a good bit out there which will allow me to make a better choice. The problem is, as you guys have pointed out, that I don't have enough experience to say what I do and do not like. I don't know what "comfortable" is supposed to feel like, so I don't know if it is something I like or not. I do think that the night sights will help because at Gunsite we go on a night shoot. Thanks for the replies guys.

    What do you think about a more comfortable grip? The factory grip does not seem bad to me, but I then again I have never held a molded grip or whatever.
    Thanks again.
     
  6. gary newport

    gary newport

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    Perhaps at Gunsite, you'll get a chance to handle other folks' Glocks with various alterations done to them. That may help in choosing among the options.

    As to grip changes, one very popular and inexpensive option is the Hogue slip-on grip. These only cost about ten bucks, so you aren't risking much to give them a try. These grips can be somewhat difficult to put on the gun. I've seen suggestions to warm them up with a hair dryer to make them easier to slip on.

    Another popular grip enhancement is the Agrip by Brooks Tactical. This is a sort of "Velvet Elvis" wraparound grip stick-on, that looks funny, costs about twenty bucks or so, and is well spoken of by those who have tried it. (I haven't.)

    There are other rubberlike slip-ons available for about ten bucks. Lone Wolf Distributers has them (under their own brand name) for full, compact, and subcompact Glocks. Pachmayr makes a finger-groove model for subcompact Glocks that I am currently experimenting with on full and compact sizes. (It doesn't cover the entire grip on bigger guns, but may be helpful anyway. The results aren't in yet on this.)