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Glock Competion shooting

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by new2town, Jun 10, 2002.

  1. new2town

    new2town

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    Does anyone here use the method of firing the glock that does not let the trigger return fully, in competion. How do you draw & fire the first shot? Thanks
     
  2. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    There is only one way to fire the first shot.:)
     

  3. mlanush

    mlanush

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    you must be talking about letting the trigger come back enough to reset and then start your squeeze to fire the next shot., not allowing the trigger to come all the way back to a stop and then start your pulll.........? that is the only thing i can think of

    but the first shot is always the same a longer pull

    mark l
     
  4. Mark L Miller

    Mark L Miller

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    Yes........During plate racks at GSSF matches or really anywhere that I am shooting two or more shots at one target area I use the "barely" reset method. After getting some great pointers from Bobby Carver, I started doing that & it absolutely works best for me. I read recently in a mag where an expert shooter(I have never been good at names) was saying not to do that but I guess you just have to choose your method & stick with it. He only said something like your trigger pull distance was different from first shot to second shot if you do that. He also said to be "surprised" when your shot goes off. That makes no sense to me. After a few thousand rounds, my hand knows exactly where the trigger is in relation to everything else when the striker will drop. How can you be surprised? Why do you want to be surprised? He really made no good points on either of these issues, at least not good enough to make me change my method. As I am trying to improve my abilities, I do continue to read & attempt to try pointers but I have to look at where they come from & how they work for me & evaluate their success for my particular idiosyncracies. If they work, I try to learn them, if not, dump it & go on. ;a MLM ;g
     
  5. LeggNet

    LeggNet www.UDPL.net

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  6. new2town

    new2town

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    Thanks,(new2town)
     
  7. new2town

    new2town

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  8. new2town

    new2town

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    Yes , I started using the barely reset method to improve my accuracy & most of all my speed & the first shot was terribly slow . To improve the first shot for speed & accuracy I practiced begining at surrender position with a ful mag.,trigger not reset, empty chamber. At the beep I would draw & after the gun is pointed down range hold the trigger back & cycle the slide. Then find sight picture and fire. Believe it or not it was a little quicker & alot more accurate.Keep in mind this requires full concenration on the safty aspect of pulling the trigger before you are ready to fire. This is only done when I can address the targets without having to change location. It seems to work for me. Range masters do look at you funny when you make ready & don't put a round in the chamber..... Please resond. I realize this is not a self defence Technique.
     
  9. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    It may seem to work fine when dryfiring, but your begging for an A/D as soon as you try it with a full mag.;Q
     
  10. Mark L Miller

    Mark L Miller

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    New,
    I am not trying to be critical but most of the competitions I go to, it is against the rules to have your finger on the trigger, or in the trigger guard until the buzzer goes off. I noticed in Carrolton that noone was calling their hands at it, but I saw several of the police competitors with their fingers in the trigger guard well before the buzzer went off. If anyone else wonders, it was the guys with the military camo pants, brown shirts, black combat boots, thigh holsters, military haircuts, you know ;P ;) . They were shooting either 3 or 4 guns each without stepping back after their turn at two of them. Another rule, I thought, was two guns, then you step back & let someone else go. I guess I was wrong. ;Q
    I think you will find with practice that speed for the first shot will improve. Bobby Carver did a post for practicing speed from the buzzer to the first shot. It is in the sticky's over at the GSSF sight. I have my times down on first shot & hit from low ready to about .80 or so. They are great tips over there, even if you don't shoot gssf matches. Good luck, & practice, practice, practice. MLM :)
     
  11. bcgunner

    bcgunner

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    Hi new2town,
    I agree with other people's comments that having your finger on the trigger before you're ready to fire isn't very safe. In IPSC, you get DQ'd if you do this.

    Even if you were totally safe using this move, it still does not solve your problem with the first shot after a reload, or after moving to the next shooting position. You're not really thinking of keeping that trigger depressed while you do the reload, or while you're moving, are you?

    A better approach would be to practice taking up the slack for the first shot until it becomes automatic to you. When you're practicing your draws at home, don't press the trigger all the way in, just stop at the point where you've taken up all the slack and you feel the resistance of the trigger's last stage. You can also practice this with a reload - draw, aim, press trigger until you take up slack, do a reload, aim again, press trigger until you take up all the slack. Do this a couple of hundred times and it should be second nature to you.

    BTW, the comments about the "surprise" break apply mainly for accuracy shooting where you're not pressured for time, or for the really hard shots. You focus on the front sight and don't anticipate the shot going off.

    bcgunner
     
  12. new2town

    new2town

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  13. ryucasta

    ryucasta IDPA/IPSC Cuban

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