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Glocksmith, yes. Gunsmith, no.
 
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Try to order parts from the factory to replace worn or broken parts.
If you order a lot of parts, you will save money, because the stuff retailers charge you $6.95 for costs about $1 from Glock.

On the other hand, I have a big box of Glock parts that I have had and carried to major matches for at least 10-12 years. So far all I have ever used from it is a spring cup to replace one I lost during disassembly. So being able to order cheap parts may not add up to much.
 
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Glocksmith, yes. Gunsmith, no.
That depends what 'is' means. My understanding is that their definition of a gunsmith is anyone who does work that enhances the accuracy of a gun. That is at least as broad as it is long, and the directive does not come from the BATF, but rather from the Department of Homeland Security.
Not meaning to argue about it, but it seems something we should all at least be aware of, particularly since there is a $2,250 yearly fee, and, presumably, penalties for non compliance.
Moon
 

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A swamp dude
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I took the course about five years ago with my son, and it was a fun, interesting day. I had never disassembled my Glocks beyond field stripping, so I learned a lot about parts nomenclature, the right way to disassemble/reassemble, common mistakes to avoid when working on a Glock, safe maintenance practices and basic troubleshooting. The enjoyment and practical knowledge gained made my enrollment cost worthwhile, but the cost was not an issue for me.

If cash is tight, spend your $250 on training or ammo. There are lots of on-line videos about taking Glocks apart that can serve as an intro to detail stripping for cleaning and parts replacement. The reality about owning a Glock is that field-strip cleaning is all that's really needed for reliable operation, and parts failure usually isn't a problem unless you shoot a lot more than most of us do.

Add the armorer's class to your bucket list of things to do when cash is plentiful. It's just a fun and interesting way to spend a day, especially if you can do it with a friend or family member. My son and I competed for the best test score; he won, but he studied before class day.
 

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The class is very worthwhile. I first took it in 1997 and have re-certified every 3 years since then. There is no substitute for hands on training and learning how to do things the right way. You will learn far more about Glock pistols than just taking them apart and putting them back together, I have been servicing other peoples Glocks since 1997 but do a lot of free work. I do charge $20.00 for sight installation and alignment.
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I agree. I took the course last year. I admit, you can watch some Youtube videos and buy a couple of books and figure out how to take a Glock apart. On the other hand having an armorer there to point out the real right way and wrong way to do things, things you should avoid doing, and the differences among the various models is much more worthwhile than a video.

You end up with the ability to actually service someone else's Glock to Glock specifications, buy parts from Glock, and get a good manual that covers the different generations and models. Plus when I took it in Gettysburg I got a surprisingly filling lunch!
 
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The Armorers Course is on my short list of things to do after the first of the year.
 
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Adirondacker with a Glock
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I took the course almost a year before the Pocket Pistols came out, and as a result was pretty confident detail stripping the older guns, but was a bit dumbfounded with the changes in the 42 & 43. So I buttonholed the armorer at the last match (who was the same guy that taught our course) and he gave me a crash course on the changes in the Pocket Glock. Well worth the money IMHO. I especially liked the 6 "Function Checks" you should do with every Glock you pick up to make sure they're in tip-top condition!
There's all kinds of nonsense on You Tube, from self-taught "Experts".
 

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Adirondacker with a Glock
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But don't quit your day job. Kinda like the old "Maytag Repairman" Ads. People who'll pay you to monkey with their Glocks are few and far between.
 

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Patriot
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Took the Glock Armorers course today. Learned a lot and enjoyed the course. We had an additional chapter on the 42 and 43. The instructor was very knowledgable and provided a lot of valuable info.
 

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Two certifications during my LEO days. Would help co-workers with any issues that would arise.
I would NOT charge any price or compensation. If any parts needed to be ordered they would pay for it I'd just order it at GA cost.
 
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Forget about it. YOU will never make money impressing your "friends" with your expertise. All your reasons for wanting to become a Glock Armorer are mis-placed. I can assure you, all the genuine GT heroes, and there are a few, know what they know because they have a love for Glock pistols. You have not experienced that understanding yet.
Spend the money; Take the course. Everyone learns *something from the course. Then if you want to charge others for your services you will at least know what your doing. However, by then, you won't like the folks that do come to you (do you know why?). If I wanted a genuine Armorer to work on my Glock, I'd go the nearest GSSF match and get it done for free. No offense; but there is a message in this message.
P.S.
There must be reasons for taking the Basic Course three or four times, but I don't know what those are. The prohibition by Glock Smyrna not to sell parts to those who have expired CERTS is ridiculous. BTW, there is one guy on this thread that can do what he wants; and that is because he has done more un-paid work and promotion for Glock pistols than anyone I know of... I suspect he knows who he is!
 

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Wut?
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I joined GSSF a few months ago just so I could take the armorer's course a couple of weeks ago (got my certificate this past Tuesday). I really enjoyed it, and I got tips and insights that I haven't seen on YouTube. Two years from now, I plan to take the 2 day advanced armorers course. I can't really justify it from a cost/benefit perspective, but I just want to do it. I'm committed to Glock pistols (not that I don't own anything else), and I want to know them inside and out.
 

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But don't quit your day job. Kinda like the old "Maytag Repairman" Ads. People who'll pay you to monkey with their Glocks are few and far between.
I am on my 4th armorers class. Good stuff. Myself and another armorer do the annual Glock inspection. Have to change out an occasional part. I even put an ad out at my local private range offering inspections and parts replacement for a small fee to have a little “side hustle”. Believe me the way Glocks run you won’t make any money. Unless, a ding dong totally jacks up his/her gun and wants you to bail them out.
 
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