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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I buy Glock pistols because they are supposed to shoot every time you pull the trigger. I have had many over the years recommended them to everyone else because I have had good luck with them and been able to hit my target. Never scared to buy a used one figured it was like getting a used diamond. I got two Generation four 45 over the summer and they don't hit the primer hard enough to ignite and have to work the slide again for it to work. I have ejected the round and there is a good dent in the primer. Never had this problem with my third generation pistols mostly .40 caliber. I replaced the springs and still happening and want to like the 41.
 

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It's unusual to have Light Primer Strikes on Glock, and even more when it is on 2 Glocks at the same time.

They are either very unlikely to be OEM Firing Pin Springs -OR- some unusually hard primered ammo is being fired from both guns (or all the above).

Be certain that the Firing Pin Springs are OEM and use other properly spec'd ammo. That's a good first step to getting to the bottom of the issue.

Good luck.
 

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Are you saying that there is a good dent in the primer after one strike or only after the second strike? If there is a good dent after the first strike, how was it the guns fault?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Using Winchester primers bought some Remington primers going to try them out. Using a Dillon SDB have had many years and talked with customer service to get primer cup depth right. Looks set right to me as most shoot. After the first no shoot I have racked the bullet out no extra force needed and looking at the primer saw a nice dent that should have sent the round down range. I am not used to shooting and having to reset my trigger to get the round to work. I am used to shooting until the magazine is empty which is normal.
 

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In my experience, the .45 casing is more susceptible to poorly seated primers than the other pistol calibers. I buy my brass in bulk, mixed, once fired. I ream the primer pockets before I use them, and never let other brass into the batch. I own a G41. I get light strikes if I don’t ream the pockets, none if I ream them.
 

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It's unusual to have Light Primer Strikes on Glock, and even more when it is on 2 Glocks at the same time.

They are either very unlikely to be OEM Firing Pin Springs -OR- some unusually hard primered ammo is being fired from both guns (or all the above).

Be certain that the Firing Pin Springs are OEM and use other properly spec'd ammo. That's a good first step to getting to the bottom of the issue.

Good luck.


I have a revolver that produced good primer dents on 1/3 of all rounds from the same ammo manufacturer without any shells firing. Some would go off with repeated strikes, some wouldn't. I have photos of the primers, both fired, fired after repeated strikes, and not firing at all. All primer dents appear the same depth. Different brand ammo that fired 100% of the time in the same weapon showed less denting than the problem brand.

Any other ammo worked flawlessly. I checked the headstamp and related or not, the ammo manufacturer also produced military ammo in a South American country. I figure it was the primers. I never use that brand of ammunition anymore.
 

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I feel your pain. Spend enough time on Glock Talk and you will believe that one single malfunction, EVER, indicates that your Glock somehow isn't a Glock. My 27 Gen4 had problems with light primer strikes (all kinds of ammo) until it had about 700 rounds through it. I love the gun and determined early-on that I wasn't giving up on it. But Glocks DO malfunction. And I don't care what others say, some of them (however rare) DO require a break-in. Ask Hickok45 about his 19 Gen4 . . .
 

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Using Winchester primers bought some Remington primers going to try them out. Using a Dillon SDB have had many years and talked with customer service to get primer cup depth right. Looks set right to me as most shoot. After the first no shoot I have racked the bullet out no extra force needed and looking at the primer saw a nice dent that should have sent the round down range. I am not used to shooting and having to reset my trigger to get the round to work. I am used to shooting until the magazine is empty which is normal.
Sounds like a typical high primer issue.
 

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... (You didn't even mention ammo in the first post-- had to tease it out) but, it must be the Glock! The only problem I've had with Glock light strikes were when using surplus mil ammo (back in the days when surplus pistol ammo was sold). If it is a used gun- or bought used (or you have messed with it)-- there may be a chance the striker channel is dirty or oiled.

So stay away from mil surp and poorly done reloads-- save those for the less perfect guns with real hammers. Strikers do not hit as hard as a hammer.
 

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... (You didn't even mention ammo in the first post-- had to tease it out) but, it must be the Glock! The only problem I've had with Glock light strikes were when using surplus mil ammo (back in the days when surplus pistol ammo was sold). If it is a used gun- or bought used (or you have messed with it)-- there may be a chance the striker channel is dirty or oiled.

So stay away from mil surp and poorly done reloads-- save those for the less perfect guns with real hammers. Strikers do not hit as hard as a hammer.
You made my point. Per Glock Talk, Glocks fire ANY ammunition whatsoever that we feed them. ANY ammo . . . or it's not a Glock. After all, Glock's motto:

When I pull the trigger it goes BANG!
When I pull the trigger it goes BANG!
When I pull the trigger it goes BANG!
When I pull the trigger it goes BANG!
When I pull the trigger it goes BANG!
When I pull the trigger it goes BANG!

Sometimes when we pull the trigger, it doesn't go BANG . . Even though it's a Glock.
 

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ANY and ALL ammunition . . Just do a Glock Talk search. Factory, military surplus, or Uncle Bill's shadetree reloads . . . Glocks eat all the ammo we give them. Period. Or they're not Glocks.

Edit: Just check Glock Talk. ANY AMMO.
 

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If the firing pin gets any interference whatsoever from the firing pin safety you’ll get a light strike.

Make sure the trigger bar is properly pushing up on the firing pin safety. If you have any spare parts on hand you could try replaing one part at a time to see if one of the reolacement parts solves your problems.
 

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There are at least four pistol defects that can cause cartridge ignition problems in a G41:
1. A Firing Pin Spring with less than the OEM spring's fully withdrawn force of 5.5-lbf. (Aftermarket!)
2. Use of a Trigger Bar without alignment bump, which may then fail to align and raise the Firing Pin Safety sufficiently. Glocks in 45ACP have *always* required a Trigger Bar with the alignment bump (since 1991).
3. Rubbing of the Firing Pin with the Firing Pin Channel Liner due to Spring Cup or Channel Liner problems. This may also be caused by "cerakoting".
4. Pistol not returning to full battery before the trigger is pulled. Having the Slide Lock with its top groove facing forward prevents full return to battery, although usually not enough to prevent cartridge ignition.

Unless there's been some use of modified or non-OEM parts in the G41 firing mechanism, this is almost certainly ammo related...regardless of the natural temptation to blame the pistol.

It would have been useful to know if the G41 is entirely factory original all-stock OEM in EVERY detail. I get suspicious when that simple detail is withheld.
 
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After the first no shoot I have racked the bullet out no extra force needed and looking at the primer saw a nice dent that should have sent the round down range.
What am I missing? You state there is a "nice dent" in the primer. That is not the indication of a light strike. How can this be a pistol problem?

These are reloads, right? Have you tried running a box or two of decent factory ammo? THEN, if the problem repeats, call it a pistol problem.

From your OP, I gather this is a used pistol(s)? Have you checked that the striker channel is clean and dry?

Good luck and Happy New Year.
 

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Try it with a couple or more brands of factory ammo. If you get consistent light strikes between brands, then box it back up and exercise your warranty options. It may be somewhat of a pain, but it doesn’t hurt for the factory to get feedback in order to determine if there are any issues that slipped by them for any reason. Glock and other manufacturers are primarily concerned with their guns running reliably with quality factory loaded ammo and won’t likely give a rip about how reloads run in their products. One thing that often gets overlooked when in diagnosing light strikes in the gunk that can buildup inside the striker channel. Gunky powder or bathing the slide with solvent during cleaning will cause buildup, eventually shortening the striker travel.
 
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