Glock 26 and Glock 30 JAMMING; HELP!!

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Torontogunguy, May 27, 2007.

  1. Torontogunguy

    Torontogunguy

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    PLEASE HELP ME - I AM IN A QUANDARY!

    I have an urgent problem; I have purchased a couple of compact Glocks, a Glock 26 and a Glock 30, with installed replacement drop in XXXXX XXXX barrels in both to keep them Canada legal while in Canada (they must be 106mm long). The problem? Initially they are jamming one hundred percent of the time. Failing to feed. I open the slide and find that the recoil spring assembly is not sitting in the groove that it is supposed to sit in - said groove being on the chamber end of the barrel. On measuring I discover that the groove is .41" dia. and that the small disk at the rear end of the recoil spring assembly is .5" diameter. Ooops. Mismatched. I am investigating.....


    quote:
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    Originally posted by JimmyN
    Watch this animation to see how it functions.

    Change all the check boxes from "Visible" to "Split" so you can see a cut-away view of everything.

    Glock Animation
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    This is a great site and a superb animation. It clears things up a lot for me.

    I am now wondering if the recoil spring assembly, coming loose from the 'groove' in the barrel where it sits during reassembly of the slide, can actually cause the jam. The groove is .42" dia and I understand now why the edges are rounded... it is to permit the disk at the end of the recoil spring assembly to float in and out of the groove during the cycling of the slide. However, the disk on the recoil spring assembly that is supposed to fit into that groove is .5" (and it appears likely that all of the NEW or CORRECT barrel grooves are indeed supposed to be .5" dia.). I am now wondering if the fact that the disk at the end of the recoil spring assembly, being .5" dia, and the groove being only .41" diameter... if that disk can 'jam up' the workings and prevent the barrel from dropping down to pick up the next round off the ramp coming out of the magazine? It only makes sense that should the barrel fail to drop down due to the 'disk' getting in the way... there is no way that a fresh round coming up the ramp is going to fit into the chamber. It is going to hit the chamber at too high an angle and the whole shebang is going to wind up in a three point jam, like trying to parralel park a car at too steep an angle and getting caught between the curb and the car behind you. Hmmmm.

    Any gunsmiths on here care to comment? This is a real problem for me. It WAS suggested, to be quite honest, that I simply grind down the diameter of the disk on the recoil spring assembly guide rod to .41" to make it fit properly... but I am wondering which is the correct dimension... namely, the .41" diameter or the .5" diameter? (Remember this is on a Glock 26 and a Glock 30... my other full sized Glocks have the barrel groove at .41" AND the disk at .41" and they match, resulting in absolutely zero failures). It is only the Glock 26 and 30 that I am having the problem with.

    So which is the correct dimension guys? Anyone with a Glock 26 or a Glock 30 out there care to take a moment with a ruler or caliper and see what diameter the groove in the barrel is... and what diameter the disk at the end of the recoil spring assembly is?

    Thanks very much in advance.

    As was quoted elsewhere, any gun that jams once in a thousand times is cause for serious worry. And any gun with even one jam or failure to feed in 500 rounds is useless for anything but a range gun. Nobody in their right mind would depend on one for defense of their life.

    THE BOTTOM LINE AND SHORT STORY:
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    Glock 26 and 30 (compacts): Barrel groove is .42" diameter and disk on end of recoil spring assembly is .50" diameter. They do NOT match and these guns are jam-o-matics. The barrel manufacturer recommended either grinding down the disk on the recoil spring assembly or buying a replacement recoil spring assembly with a .42" diameter disk. They apparently do the grinding it down thing and advise that this works.

    Glock 17, 21, 22, 34, etc. (full size) Barrel groove is .42" diameter and disk end of recoil spring assembly is .42" dia. They match and these guns are 100 percent reliable. NOT A SINGLE FAILURE.

    Comments?
     
  2. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Work on your grip, shift your weight forward and control the recoil. With the typical Glock limpwristing symptoms occurring in 2 different guns, the problem is almost certainly you and not the guns. Forget the recoil spring assembly - it's fine and it doesn't always stay perfectly in the groove.
     

  3. Torontogunguy

    Torontogunguy

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    That was one of the first things to come to mind; but we also have a Glock 17, 21,22, 34. No, it is definitely not a limpwristing issue at all.It MUST have something to do with the recoil spring assembly and the mismatch in diameters between the groove in the barrel and the diameter of the disk on the end of the spring assembly. The disk on the spring assembly is .5" and we just confirmed this AM that this is the right diameter, as another Glock 26 user measured his. It must have something to do with the groove. If I push the spring assembly down into place as best I can the gun jams 1 in 10 shots and then continuously. I remove the slide, push the spring back down and put the slide back on. I get about ten shots away properly and then the gun becomes a jam o matic again. The groove in the barrel is only .42" diameter. I can't see anything else that is causing the problem. Why do they bother with a groove anyway, since the spring will stay on even if the surface was flat? I am still puzzled.

    MDL