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Glock 20 accuracy and reliability

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Milt, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. Milt

    Milt

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    Hey Guys, I need your help. I am considering replacing my .44 Mag woods gun with a Glock 20 now that a good variety of full power 10mm ammo is again available. A couple of Glock 19's that my 'significant other' and I recently 'adopted' have given me this crazy idea. The 19 seems immune to 'limp-wrist' induced malfunctions (I tried, deliberately, with both of ours and several others, and the things cycled EVERY time). I can make head shots with them out to 50 yards, so accuracy is not a problem, either. Since I will have to make central-nervous-system hits to 'stop' a bear, the 10mm with the right bullet should do this as well as the .44mag - and I get more chances to make a good hit because of faster recoil recovery. Using the same action type for my woods gun as for my daily carry gun should make this type of shooting more reflexive and increase my chances of getting out of a hairy situation with fewer pieces missing...
    My questions are: how accurate is a typical Glock 20, in your collective experience - and how resistant is it to limp-wristed shooting (I might not get the gun out fast enough to avoid injury if suddenly attacted by a bear or whatever - thus the concern)?
    Any relevant experience would be helpful for this decision. Thanks for your help...
     
  2. Chainsaw Maniac

    Chainsaw Maniac

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    I have a G20 and love it. It's more accurate than I am. But if bears get much over about 400 pounds or so out your way, I would hang on to the .44. One of our members took out a bear a while back in Alaska with a G29 and factory XTPs. The animal weighed about 600-650 pounds IIRC, and he laid it down with one shot that penetrated thru and thru. But he also had a heavy caliber rifle as backup, plus a heavily armed buddy. And he said he didn't hit any bone to speak of.

    The G20 is a fantastic pistol IMO, but it has its limitations.

    If you do go with a G20, be sure to check out Double Tap's line of ammo.
     

  3. Milt

    Milt

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    Thanks, A big bear here is anything over 300 pounds, but we have mountain lions that, thanks to the tree huggers, think that hikers (most of whom are foolishly unarmed) are a sort of wilderness 'meals on wheels' program. Feral dog packs are another possibility, which is why the high-cap self-loader is appealing.
    Have you ever tried shooting a Glock 20 limp-wristed?
     
  4. Chainsaw Maniac

    Chainsaw Maniac

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    Nope. Never shot a 20 limp-wristed. But it sounds like a G20 might be perfect for you, perhaps with some of McNett's XTPs.
     
  5. dao

    dao Brrrr.

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    I have a few thousand rounds (3000, 4000?) through my 10 year old (only about 5 years in my possesion) G20 (yeah, I don't shoot it as often as I would like, but maybe I will more often now since Blazer has the cheap, al-cased stuff in 10mm now for 11/box - good enough for the range!).

    Anyway, have not had a single failure of any sort with it yet (knock on wood). Has been extremely reliable, even when I've abused it (it once went 2 years only being fired once; it probably sat well over a year without a cleaning or oiling - loaded it up and it shot fine).

    For reliability, G20 is good in my book. (well, I would say the same for ALL of my Glocks). As for accuracy, I'm very happy with it - the 10mm seems to have a very flat trajectory, like the .357 sig. I typically do well at the range with them.
     
  6. Akita

    Akita gone

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    I love my Glocks and I love 10mm. But you are stepping down in power when you go from 44mag to 10mm regardless of the 10mm load you have.
    Personally, I think 12G slug or large rifle caliber is a minimum for western bears. My unsolicitated advice is to stay with the 44mag.

    Now to answer what you asked:
    IMO, G20's are quite accurate, even more so with one of the better quality barrels.
    I dont think the G20 is prone to limpwristing at all.
     
  7. Milt

    Milt

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    Thanks, everybody, for your input. I am not sure that the .44 is enough of an increase in power over the 10 to put it into the 'other than central-nervous-system hits' category for bear stopping as opposed to bear hunting (which would be the reason to stay with the .44 and give up the auto's continuity of fire advantage on non-bear threats) - I agree with Akita that a heavy rifle is probably the best answer, but I'm looking to go 'woods loafing' with minimal baggage, which rules out long guns...
     
  8. Eliakim

    Eliakim

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    Yes the .44 mag with full power loads is more powerful per shot than a full power 10mm, BUT the Glock 10mm are smaller lighter and easier to carry than most .44 mags. And if you do happen have a 44 revolver that is smaller and/or lighter than even a G20, than it will most likely have slow recovery for follow-up shots.

    IMHO there's a better chance you'll have the Glock 10mm with you when you really need it than a bigger more powerful .44 mag or 12ga. shotgun.
     
  9. agtman

    agtman 10mm Spartiate

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    "BUT the Glock 20 are smaller lighter and easier to carry ..."

    Not to mention that a G20 holds 15+1 rounds of "bear-stopper" 220gn BTB hammerhead loads (or whatever MCNETT currently recommends for bruin defense while hiking out in the wilds :) ).

    Sure, absent a rifle - which ideally is what you should have - a .44mag isn't a bad choice, but why settle for a mere 6 rounds in a heavy, very-hard-to-control-in-rapid-fire package?
     
  10. LDHunter

    LDHunter

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    I'll second what agtman said just just above this message.

    My G20 has replaced my S&W 629 as my main hunting sidearm and I have no doubts as to it being an improvement in firepower and carryability (is that a word???) over my 44mag 629.

    Be sure to call Mike McNett (owner of Double Tap) and describe your anticipated bear encounter situations and I'm sure he'll get you outfitted just right.

    You're gonna need spring upgrades anyway if you want to shoot his ammo and he's VERY interesting and knowledgable to talk to and he'll have everything you need.

    1-866-357-10MM Double Tap Ammunition!

    $bob$
     
  11. Milt

    Milt

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    Thanks again, guys.
    I just waffled on this issue - I traded one of my .44s for a 10mm pistol, having it both ways by keeping the other .44.
    After handling the Glock 20, a Smith 1066, and a Kimber Stainless Target, the Kimber won the 'feels good in my hands' contest despite the fact that I've been telling myself that I need a 1911 like I need another hole in my head. I carried a 1911 for a couple of decades and I guess the old programming is still there... The fact that the Kimber was the best looking gun and was admirably tight didn't hurt. Emotion triumphs over logic, again.
    I have noticed on other threads in this forum that many of you like Kimbers; I'm going to the range tomorrow, so I guess I'll see for myself. If the thing works and shoots straight, I'll take your advice and call Mike McNett about some carry ammo.
     
  12. Akita

    Akita gone

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    Re 44mag on Brownies:
    Sure, I realize you get many more shots of 10mm vs 44mag, BUT in sudden bear encounters it is RARE to get off more than a few shots. The extra capacity just aint gonna help. That 1st or 2nd shot has GOT to Stop or Deter (Deter is unlikely if s/he's made up her/his mind to attack and the range is close) the charge and the 44 mag is WAAAAAAAY better at that. I think we all know that.

    Read just about any bear mauling story in any outdoor mag and somewhere in it, you will find the phrase "...as I rounded the bend..." There is almost always the element of suprise involved. There just isnt time to get off more than a few rounds.
    And only well-placed hits count. Shoulder hits stop the charge. Heart/body shots will just kill the bear after he chews on you a while.
     
  13. Chainsaw Maniac

    Chainsaw Maniac

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    QUOTE: "IMHO there's a better chance you'll have the Glock 10mm with you when you really need it than a bigger more powerful .44 mag or 12ga. shotgun."

    The point about the .44 is well-taken, but I myself would probably be a bit more prone to grab the G20 instead of shrugging it off and figuring that since I'm going for a short walk I won't need the .44 or shotgun.

    It might also pay to remember about making some noise, especially if you're in heavy brush. But then again, that might just be the dinner bell for a hungry bruin.

    I'm still waiting for Marlin to make a stainless .500 lever gun.
     
  14. Akita

    Akita gone

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    I kinda assume that we all carry all the time when we can legally do so.

    I do so anyway. You'd never catch me out of the house in serious brown bear country without a 44mag if I owned one. I guess it may be different with other folks. If you've got a job to do, dont be caught without the proper tool.
     
  15. suntiet

    suntiet

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    www.wildwestguns.com for the 500 lever gun
     
  16. Chainsaw Maniac

    Chainsaw Maniac

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    I sometimes wonder if the foresters up in Alaska carry a heavy caliber long gun with them when they are out cruising timber or surveying. I would think it should be mandatory in those parts. Or at the very least a .44 or .454.

    I heard WildWestGuns makes a .500 lever gun, but I also heard they are awfully expensive. Besides, I've got this thing for stainless Marlin rifles. And even if .500 lever guns eventually catch on, I believe the .45/70 will continue to be seen as a legitimate caliber in that regard.
     
  17. Sabot 23

    Sabot 23 Jedi wannabe

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    How about an AR-15 upper chambered in .50 Beaowulf (sp?). It is an autoloader, and the .50 Beaowulf uses the same bullets as the "mighty" 500 s&w magnum, and is actually a little hotter than the 500mag, I belive.

    I live in FL, so the "bear-stopper" debate is kinda off-limits to me.

    I do think the convenience of the G20 is a valid point, though.

    IF, I ever find myself walking around in Brown Bear Country, and it is legal to carry a firearm, I would have my Rem 870 12g slung over my shoulder, and my G20 as backup. If it was a place where guns were forbiden, I would only have my G20 - well concealed.
     
  18. Chainsaw Maniac

    Chainsaw Maniac

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    I hadn't thought of the .50 Beaowulf, but it is definitely worth mentioning. I would need to spend some time with it first to be sure of reliability. At this point, I would have to say that I am more comfortable with a .45/70 or .50 lever gun in terms of reliability, but that could change with enough range time and a Beaowulf.

    I have to agree about the convenience of the G20. It's kind of like stepping outside in shorts and no shirt, and dropping a P3AT in your pocket. It might not be as strong as you really want, but it's awful easy to grab on the way out, and will usually do in a pinch.
     
  19. Eliakim

    Eliakim

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    And the G20 is small & light enough to carry in an IWB holster with just shorts and a tee shirt. Sort of like a BUG for bear:cool:

    It gives the old expression,"I've got a bomb in my pants!" a new and fresh meaning. ;f
     
  20. surfinusa

    surfinusa

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    The 10mm is a great round but you guys are dreamers if you think it matches a 41 mag, let alone a 44 mag in their maximum loadings. If and when the SHTF it will be close and fast. You'll be lucky to get 3 maybe 4 good shots off let alone 16.

    A good solid hit with a 22 may be better than a miss with a 44 mag. But a good solid hit with a 44 is better than a hit from a 10mm and the rest of the mag you never got a chance to get off.

    A G20 is a big holster gun so is a 44 magnum. Where I live either will do fine. I usually carry a G27 in 40 or a 357 mag because it will work just fine on pigs, black bear, gator or panther (also because my dad told me a long time ago and I've always found it to be true, that with a little common sence all you really have to worry about in the woods or the swamp is other people). However, if you go where big bears go keep your 44.