Ghost 3.5 # trigger bar/ reliable?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by NHmike, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. NHmike

    NHmike

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    I am sure this topic has had its butt kicked but I am looking for some up to date info and opinions.

    The Ghost 3.5 trigger bar...

    1. can I really install it myself with out incident?

    2. how will it effect the reliability of this weapon?


    My G19 is also one of my carry pistols so I don't want to sacrifice reliability or function. The way I look at it is, it is a $20 part. As long as the pistol still functions like it is sposed to, how can I go wrong....

    Thanks!
     
  2. SpyderTattoo72

    SpyderTattoo72

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    I think you mean the connector. It is very easy to install, check youtube. It shouldn't effect the reliability of the gun at all.

    I just switched back to origonal from using a Ghost Rocket 3.5. It wasn't worth the money to me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2010

  3. NHmike

    NHmike

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    can you explain?
     
  4. SouthernBoyVA

    SouthernBoyVA

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    I have tested five different connectors in my primary carry gun, a 3G G23, and have found that overall the best of the lot was the Glock 3.5 connector, part #00135.
     
  5. MrOldLude

    MrOldLude

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    I went w/ Scherer myself. Felt the couple bucks I spent was justified. With the $0.25 trigger job and the connector, I feel I am able to shoot more accurately now that it breaks at a lower weight.
     
  6. albinlee

    albinlee

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    I tried putting the 3.5 lb Ghost connector in my Glock 19, and really did love it for awhile. I was definitely shooting tighter groups, and had 100% reliability in 1000 rounds. I felt that for carry, especially with a level 1 retention holster (which is only held by tension), the standard 5 lb connector was more appropriate. Here are my experiences:
    1. Depending on whether your gun is primarily for range or for carry, I would recommend going ghost 3.5, or staying stock (respectively).
    2. I originally tried the Lone Wolf 3.5 lb connector, and the part was so far out of spec that I could not rack my slide back, it was literally locked. This was bad because I also couldn't break the gun down to get the part out. After pulling the slide about as hard as I could, I finally wiggled the slide enough to open the action, and disassemble. This was a terrible experience, and really I cant see myself buying anything from LW in the future.
    3. The Glock "-" connector, as stated by Southern, was unfortunately discontinued by Glock, and is no longer being sold as a spare part. This means that they are of limited supply, and will be more expensive than the Ghost. Also, the Glock factory 3.5 is pretty rough on the outside, whereas the Ghost is polished from the start. I think the Ghost is the best 3.5 connector for your money.
     
  7. Ticman

    Ticman

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    Last edited: Oct 19, 2010
  8. NHmike

    NHmike

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    Good info, thanks!
     
  9. spitrhyma

    spitrhyma

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    First of all... out of your 2 questions 1 of them is quite inappropriate... "Can I install it myself without incident?"

    The reason it's inappropriate is because it's a trick question...

    So basically you're asking "Do you guys think I'm a smart person?" -- And the answer would have to be "no" because obviously you weren't smart enough to go to youtube and type "glock trigger connector" and find the THOUSANDS AND THOUSANDS of videos explaining how a trigger connector is installed... but on the other hand common sense would dictate that ANYbody is smart enough to install something this simple if they have fingers and thumbs...

    Usually I ignore questions like this but I feel there may be lots of people who can benefit hearing about the Ghost ROCKET trigger which is probably what you were referring to but were to careless to point out.

    ***Ghost 3.5 Trigger*** (with no trigger stop)
    I have not used the part and can't give you a true review. But generally people seem to agree that the Pearce 3.5# trigger DOES work as advertised while many of the other ones (like the Glockworxx connector) don't work consistantly. Some people say they have bought multiple Glockworxx triggers and measured the pull to find diff. weights with each one... sometimes even heavier than OEM trigger pull. So if you want to spend less on a part that gets few bad reviews... buy the Pearce connector.

    You can read reviews on MidwayUSA

    ***Glock ROCKET 3.5# Trigger***
    This does NOT stop your trigger from over traveling on RESET (which would be awesome if safety wasn't a concern) but unfortunately that would disable the factory trigger safety which is a "no-no". Instead it prevents over-travel AFTER you fire the trigger.

    In other words, when you dry-fire your trigger at home you probably won't notice that the trigger travels back FURTHER than it needs to in order to fire. You can tightly fold some paper to stuff behind your trigger and adjust it until you can just BARELY fire the trigger. Usually, no matter how good you are, you will see a VERY SMALL jolt in the gun when the trigger "clicks" during a dryfire. That jolt would be occuring while the bullet is traveling down the barrel. While this is a very small jolt, it can make all the difference in the world for a precise shot.

    The ghost rocket puts a tab behind the trigger that prevents the trigger from moving back too far. The tab is very big and requires grinding for the gun to fire. What you want to do is get it CLOSE to where it needs to be then take VERY VERY small shavings off until the gun just barely fires. This will increase your potential for accuracy.

    ---

    So to make it simple for the simple-minded... You have to permanantly modify the ROCKET by grinding away (means there's no turning back when you've overground) so this part requires patience to install. Again common sense would dictate that if you're a patient man, you would never have posted such a silly question on GlockTalk.

    The good thing about allowing you to grind the part yourself is that you don't have to worry about the part failling to eliminate overtravel or preventing your gun from firing. Guns ARE very precise but metal still bends/flexes/warps and this allows you to PERFECTLY fit the part in your particular application.

    --

    If you are using your pistol for self defense... get the pearce 3.5# trigger and pay $7. It's not like you're defending yourself from soda cans where every inch matters.

    If you're using your pistol for competition, get the Ghost Rocket and pay for the advantage it gives.

    LASTLY, Ghost Inc. has a factory warranty that covers OVER-GRINDING. IF you accidentally over-grind, send it back and they will replace it... This is part of why they charge you $30 for a $7 item.

    The orange-half-sized backplate is only going to make it easier on your hands to remove the back plate... it's not going to help you determine how much you need to grind the part so I think it's a waste of $4 on top of an overpriced trigger connector.