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A buddy of mine just had a liter of puppies. Champion bloodline, and great hunting dogs. Offering a very discounted price off a puppy. Never had a pointer before and was curious to see if anyone had some experiences with them? How are they with crate training, children, etc? Would be the first dog that my girlfriend and I would have together, so we are trying to figure out if this is a good breed for us.

Thanks!
 

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We had one for a few years. Ramsey. We got him from a shelter. Very nice dog, good with our kids. He died young due to a bad valve in his heart - we were told that this was a side effect of a case of Limes disease he had before we got him. GSPs need alot of exercise. I think most hunting dogs do. They have alot of energy to burn. He also used to take any and every opportunity to get loose and roam the streets. He was never aggressive though. Oh, and he would raid the garbage as well!!! I would consider owning another.
 

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Google "versatile hunting dog". Big running dogs, as frankemp said.
 

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We've owned them for many years. I wouldn't suggest them for most people unless you have more time than you know what to do with. They require a lot of space, time, attention, and exercise. Yes, they crate train easily for transportation and emergency purposes, they're not the type dogs to spend time/hours in a crate each day. As gentle a breed as I've seen, like a lab or beagle.

Unless really trained well, many are lost when they get loose or off leash, it's hard to get them to stop the hunt/run by calling them. More like impossible, unless trained to do so. If you have the room and time for them to run, they're hard to beat. I'd definitely suggest having them chipped if you get one. Bred to hunt, but make great loving pets, if you have the time and patience.
 

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We've owned them for many years. I wouldn't suggest them for most people unless you have more time than you know what to do with. They require a lot of space, time, attention, and exercise. Yes, they crate train easily for transportation and emergency purposes, they're not the type dogs to spend time/hours in a crate each day. As gentle a breed as I've seen, like a lab or beagle.

Unless really trained well, many are lost when they get loose or off leash, it's hard to get them to stop the hunt/run by calling them. More like impossible, unless trained to do so. If you have the room and time for them to run, they're hard to beat. I'd definitely suggest having them chipped if you get one. Bred to hunt, but make great loving pets, if you have the time and patience.
He/She would be running probably 6 miles or so a day (girlfriend does marathons and wants a running buddy,) so hopefully that would burn some energy. Definitely going to get chipped. How are they are shedding and grooming? If we got one, it'd also be spending a lot of time around horses, so that's another big concern of ours.
 

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Very minimal shedding or grooming needed, although ours love being brushed.

We have horses, but seldom let the dogs in the corral. Pointers are likely to walk under or step in front of the horse when it's in dog mode or tracking/trailing. When we let them in the pasture they don't bother the stock, just run, track, point, etc. playing bird dog. However, as mentioned, they aren't very aware of their surroundings or danger when they're doing the dog thing. If the horses are ok around other dogs I'd say there probably wouldn't be a problem.
 
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