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Brand new? Less than 200 rds? Glad you have ammo to put it through its paces. Call Glock. They will more than likely have you ship it back and they will fix it probably pay for your shipping too.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Well I did have ammo. Used the last of my factory stuff on this little gun. I got the scoop from Glock, and yes I can send it back, but I have to pay shipping to them. Looked into that and I’d have to box it and take it to the closest actual UPS distribution center, which is almost an hour out, one way, then it can’t be shipped via ground, only air, and must be insured. No big deal if it were someplace I would normally go anyway, but it’s pretty out of the way. Really tempted to just fix it myself...
 

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My 2010 production G26 exhibited that erratic ejection issue. (Unlike my '04 production G26.)

While there was a small burred edge on the outside of the extractor slot, after discussing the issue with Glock a few times I finally resolved the issue. As an armorer I'd received new revised Gen4 9mm ejectors, and Glock sent me some new extractors and a new RSA. The right combination of those 3 parts finally got that G26 running similarly to my older one ('04 production).

Previously, my older G26 would only occasionally exhibit erratic ejection on the last round (when there wasn't a "next" round in the mag to be positioned below the empty case being extracted), but that newer G26 would exhibit it at unpredictable points in different points during any magazine load, and it didn't matter whether I was using standard pressure, +P or +P+ duty ammunition.

I eventually sold that second G26 to another instructor/armorer, because he really wanted one of the green framed G26's and couldn't find one, so he talked me into selling him mine. I explained the corrective actions I'd done to address the original erratic ejection, and that didn't bother him (being a Glock armorer, himself, among other armorer certifications). He's remained pleased with its functioning, and he's a heavy shooter with all his guns.

I haven't tried the latest revised ejector for the Gen5's, myself, but I have no doubt Glock engineers decided it was a beneficial revision in the evolution of their design.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Fastbolt, it kinda sounds like Glock’s fix might involve one of the newer ejectors? I’m really thinking I should just install the gen 4 ejector I have on order and see how that works out.
By the way, I see you’re located on the central coast. Are the kelp beds coming back in down there???
 

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Fastbolt, it kinda sounds like Glock’s fix might involve one of the newer ejectors? I’m really thinking I should just install the gen 4 ejector I have on order and see how that works out.
By the way, I see you’re located on the central coast. Are the kelp beds coming back in down there???

The Gen4 ejector only partially resolved my issue, and it was the first thing I tried (a couple of the then-new Gen4 9 ejectors). Trying some different new extractors helped a little more. It was replacing the RSA that seemed to have been the final touch (after talking it over with Glock). Apparently, there were some tolerances stacked in the wrong way in my 2010 gun, until I started changing out the parts.

I did initially dress a burred edge on the extractor recess, after discussing it with Glock (and they offered to do for me, if I didn't want to do it myself), but since that didn't correct the issue I moved on to replacing the different parts they suggested. To be fair, they also offered to have it shipped to them for them to examine it and resolve the issue, but I told them that as an armorer of some year's experience I was willing to do it, and I had the time in which to do it (meaning more free time than their repair dept).

I haven't done many beach walks since covid ramped up, but it certainly looked like the kelp was strong in the surf line the few times we went down there.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
That’s interesting. I don’t know squat about this stuff, but it seems like if the RSA had that much effect on ejection pattern, then different ammo, (standard vs. +p+), would show different ejection patterns too, but obviously not. Like you said it sounds like it just took the right combination of components.
 

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That’s interesting. I don’t know squat about this stuff, but it seems like if the RSA had that much effect on ejection pattern, then different ammo, (standard vs. +p+), would show different ejection patterns too, but obviously not. Like you said it sounds like it just took the right combination of components.
Try the Gen 4 ejector first before changing out other parts. You might find that all you need is the updated ejector. If it still doesn't eject correctly, you won't be out as far as the updated ejector goes.
 

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That’s interesting. I don’t know squat about this stuff, but it seems like if the RSA had that much effect on ejection pattern, then different ammo, (standard vs. +p+), would show different ejection patterns too, but obviously not. Like you said it sounds like it just took the right combination of components.

It's easy for some folks to forget (or overlook) that compound RSA's are really assemblies, and if any of the parts used to make them may have a tolerance or QC issue it may lend itself to a head-scratching functioning issue.

Kind of like how magazines are assemblies, albeit you can replace parts in them, if necessary. ;)

Sometimes it may be easy to forget that magazines and recoil springs (and especially compound RSA's) are at the very heart of reliable, optimal pistol functioning.

The ejector is the other half of the "timing dance" when it comes to extraction and ejection, with more attention often seeming to be paid to the extractor.

Some of the gun companies have designed ejectors with longer tips (usually described as providing for "faster" ejection, or improved ejection with higher pressure loads that give a faster slide velocity), as well as refining and tweaking the angle of the tips where they contact the case base.

One of the things that can frustrate some owners/users is that the "shooter variable" (think grip technique stability) can have a strong influence on functioning, as different shooters may vary in how well they can grasp and stabilize the frame during cycling (and not allow their grip/wrist lock to "rob" force from the recoil spring). Then, there's the potential for any particular shooter's grip technique to vary, depending on the conditions at the time, including shooter inattention, injury, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Well that was an easy fix! I just swapped out the 336 ejector for the 30274. Couldn’t believe how easy it was to take everything apart, make the swap, and put it all back together. Ran out to the range and fired 20 rounds of light, 115 grain reloads. All casings went to the left, where they should go. Didn’t fly into the next county, but at least cleared my arms and were out of the way. Good enough for me.
Thanks for all the help guys!
 

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Martis1,

I'm glad to hear that swapping out the ejector worked out for you. I swap the Gen 3 336 ejector out for either the Gen 4 or 5 ejector on all my Polymer 80 builds before I even test fire them. I'v had too many instances in the past with BTF with P80 builds and with Gen 3 Glocks.


Swapping the ejector out is the easiest fix for when you have a known good recoil spring assembly and extractor.

Fastbolt is correct about the RSA can also cause ejection issues it it is worn out.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
I have to admit that for many years I was ignorant of things like RSA’s wearing out. After I’d carried my G27 for about 18 years, one of my co-workers had just returned from Glock Armorer’s school. One night at work, he asked to see my old 27. When he saw how worn down and smooth it was, (one side of the front sight was worn down so the white dot looked like a 3/4 moon...), he asked when the last time the gun had been taken down and serviced was. It never had... He tore it all down, and asked if it was the original RSA, which it was. At his suggestion, I replaced it with a Glock replacement one. New one was much stiffer. Gun seemed to function exactly the same, but I bet the new RSA is reducing the amount of abuse the slide and frame are taking.
 

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... but I bet the new RSA is reducing the amount of abuse the slide and frame are taking.
It's also reducing stress on the barrel's front lug, locking block, locking block pin, trigger pin and the slide's guide ring.

One of our guys bought a used G23 from the original owner (another cop, through a FFL). The gun was said to have only seen approx 2500rds fired. I took it apart to inspect it when he brought it to our range. I noticed the locking block pin's finish was really worn and the ends looked a bit peened. Rolling it on a flat surface revealed it didn't roll quite evenly.

The rest of the G23 looked fine, so I replaced the LB pin and the RSA (older single spring RSA) for him.

Back in 2008 Glock released a notice to some LE armorers with recommendations for when to replace what they started calling "wearable parts" in LE .40's (22/22RTF; 23/23RTF; 27 & 35). The recommended replacement interval for the G27's RSA was 3K rounds (or "more often as needed"; after checking the RSA at each range session or qualification using the recoil spring test taught to armorers).

The replacement interval for the single spring RSA's in the G23 (on that list) was every 2500rds (with the same caveat of "more often as needed", etc).

Or, as one of the Glock armorer instructors once said ... "fresh springs help keep guns alive".
 
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Discussion Starter #56
I should post a pic of the inside of the slide on my old G27. I never paid attention, but our official department armorer was looking it over one day and pointed out that there were two spots in the slide where the locking block was flexing up and hitting. He polished up a couple burrs in the slide and blackened up the bare metal. Said to keep an eye on it and if it continued with the new RSA, to let him know. I retired not too long after that, but now I see that it’s still a problem. That’s kinda why I purchased this new G26. Not sure how worn out the trusty old 27 is or how long it will last me. Maybe I should be looking at the locking block pin?
 

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Discussion Starter #57
I should add that on the g27, in addition to a new RSA, I’ve replaced the firing pin assembly, both sights, the magazine release and spring, and the trigger blade. (Removed the original serrated trigger for a smooth one), oh, and took a dremel to that hump on the trigger guard and installed Talon grips.
 

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I should post a pic of the inside of the slide on my old G27. I never paid attention, but our official department armorer was looking it over one day and pointed out that there were two spots in the slide where the locking block was flexing up and hitting. He polished up a couple burrs in the slide and blackened up the bare metal. ...
Mine too. Except I didn't bother to try and darken the bare steel in the peened spots. Cosmetic matters didn't concern me. (I'd have to remove the slide to see them, anyway. :) )

I knocked off the edge of the burrs in my G27, and then shot several thousand more rounds, but the peening apparently reached a point where it stopped. (Like flame-cutting in the top strap of a steel-framed .357MAG revolver.)

They eventually revised the LB's to reduce the potential for peening. They used to tell armorer's to file or stone off the burrs in the slide if they thought they were getting too large.

They also told us in classes over the years that the company had changed the hardening of the LB pins, as well as the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Our armorer said he was darkening the peened spots so that I could better see if the problem continued after the new RSA. It did, but the burrs he polished off haven’t returned. Since I really started paying attention to this gun a few years ago I’ve primarily shot fairly light recoiling reloads, which feel about like standard 9mm loads. I wish I had kept track of how many rounds have gone through this old gun, but I didn’t. If I had to guess, I’d say at most, 3,000 rounds total. I wonder how many more it will handle?
 

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Our armorer said he was darkening the peened spots so that I could better see if the problem continued after the new RSA. It did, but the burrs he polished off haven’t returned. Since I really started paying attention to this gun a few years ago I’ve primarily shot fairly light recoiling reloads, which feel about like standard 9mm loads. I wish I had kept track of how many rounds have gone through this old gun, but I didn’t. If I had to guess, I’d say at most, 3,000 rounds total. I wonder how many more it will handle?
It should last a long time as long as you do your regular maintenance and change all the springs on a regular schedule. Springs are wear items that need changed on a regular basis.
 
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