Gearing up for reloading rifle ammunition: Powder Measures

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by CDR_Glock, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. CDR_Glock

    CDR_Glock

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    So I have a turret press that I’ll be using for reloading my rifle.

    I’m torn amongst powder measures and automatic measures...

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    I’m limited by my range distance of 250 yards.

    Right now, I’m getting ready for my Suppressor to come. So I will be loading 300AAC, first. I’m shooting mainly from an AR pistol for it....

    I have dies for 308, 300 AAC, 5.56 mm, 6.5 Grendel, and 7 mm-08. I’m good on my supplies for All, except 300 AAC.

    Any experience or suggestions are welcome.

    Thank you.


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  2. FlyfishermanMike

    FlyfishermanMike

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    I have the older Lee plastic version. I hear the newer one is better. The Lee is a great starting point but I outgrew it quickly. I have the Hornady on a progressive and it's very accurate and well made. I have a RCBS Chargemaster and it's one of the best reloading tools I've bought. I use is for pistol and rifle, working up loads and weighing top end charges. I like that I can tinker with the speed settings as different powders dispense differently. On sale price coupled with a rebate made it reasonable.

    The auto dispensers are great for precision ammo and the manual throwers tend to be a tad faster for range ammo where a ±.1 variance isn't a big deal. Depends what you want and expect from your ammo and where speed and cost fall on your priority list. Like most, you'll probably end up with both types.
     
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  3. 10or45

    10or45 NRA Benefactor Life Member

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    I use the 050069 Lock-n-load measure for rifle with extruded powder for service rifle loads. It is very smooth if it's not shearing. I still hand weigh (trickle up) the large grained IMR 4064 for precision .308 though.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
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  4. Taterhead

    Taterhead

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    The Hornady and RCBS Uniflow powder measures are very similar. I have 3 of the green ones in. Two are case activated for the progressive. One is on a dedicated stand. A couple of standard metering cylinders and one with a small cylinder.

    For large extruded powders, I drop a little light and trickle up into the scale pan. That's been working well for me for years. Everything else is metered right from the powder measure into the case.
     
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  5. WeeWilly

    WeeWilly

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    I still use Lee Perfect Powder Measures and then hand trickle to my final weight. I have owned some extraordinarily expensive powder drops and have found no drop that I could use for precision loads unless I was using something like a BLC-2 (fine ball).
     
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  6. ObiJuan

    ObiJuan

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    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  7. Uncle Don

    Uncle Don Wood butcher

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    I had the older Lee and still use it for one load only as adjusting it takes time. Now, I use the Classic Cast powder measure because it's heavy duty and has the ability to change drums quickly that are tailor made for your load. Currently, I use three different drums and because it's so easy to do, worth changing even when loading 20 rounds. Works very well.
     
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  8. jmorris

    jmorris

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    I disagree, it’s not uncommon at all for 100/200 yard benchrest shooters to use volume measures.

    705D8EEF-9D1A-48AA-B710-B712EA9DCF3D.jpeg 8FDE6F25-D3AD-43F7-B75F-7103D2E367A1.jpeg

    They are also shooting for the smallest one hole group.

    Not like the op is shooting 1000 yard matches, he already set a distance limit of 250 yards, you don’t need to get very fancy at such short distances. Sounds silly to me, to suggest needing to trickle loads for 300aac AR pistol in any case.
     
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  9. Lil

    Lil

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    The choice of powder measure depends on your preferred workflow and volume. The electronic dispensers shine for doing a relatively low-volume number of charges and/or when the powder quantity varies, e.g. when working-up ladders. The manual dispenser is great for volume but gets tedious/time consuming when having to readjust/re-verify the metering chamber every handful of rounds, e.g. ladders.

    When using the electronic measure I will manually pour 90-95% of the desired charge from a scoop into the dish and let the electronic dispenser top it off - much faster and less wear on the machine.

    I use a Lyman Gen6 electronic dispenser and a Redding BR3 manual measure. Note the Redding has separate rifle and pistol powder-measure chambers.
     
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  10. Uncle Don

    Uncle Don Wood butcher

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    While not a benchrester, I too am a big believer in volume measuring. I have a Wednesday made Rem 308 that consistently gives 5 shot ragged holes at 100 and I've never weighed or trickled a single charge. It works for me, but if others prefer weight measuring, I won't argue it. I'll leave to liberals.
     
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  11. 10or45

    10or45 NRA Benefactor Life Member

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    I also have found at close range rifle that metering is fine. Once I stretch it out with a tuned load and jump in a tuned action and bedded reciever I still weigh even if it's just superstition. Metering would probably still give me .5 moa under 200.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2018
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  12. Uncle Don

    Uncle Don Wood butcher

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    I used to use Wilson hand dies with an arbor press for the 308. Out of curiosity, I kept track of the results between that and just using Regular Lee Collet dies. There was none.

    That said, it's a factory gun, I'll admit that in a rifle custom built for target shooting, there may be a difference, but in reality, you can also custom make the size of the decapping rod in the Collet die too. I'm curious as to the degree of difference. In both cases though, volume measuring seems to be the norm.
     
  13. Amegatek

    Amegatek

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    I use the Hornady LNL Autocharge for my .308 reloads for my bolt rifle. I just use the on press powder drop on my Dillon for .223 though. No problems with either.
     
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  14. Wyoming

    Wyoming

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    I hand load and reload.

    For hand load things are done to be as consistence as can be done. The goal is for accuracy for a particular gun. I use what ever gun powder that gives the best results. A chronograph is mandatory to check and confirm results. I use a Hornady electronic scale. This comes in handy for long extruded powers such as IMR.

    For reloading I want quantity over absolute accuracy. Mostly handgun ammo loaded on a Dillon. You don't have to give up accuracy using a progressive press. You need to use very fine grain powers such as ball powders. I have been using Winchester 748 for decades with .223/5.56 and get less than MOA with many rifles.

    However to get better than that I would have to find a particular favorite load for individual rifle. Think custom load or hand load. I own 20 rifles in 223/5.56 so I try to keep things simple and try to find something that is a good average.

    If you are only dealing with one or two you can do a very good job with a powder measure. I grew up near Kelby's rifle range in Ohio where they have held national BENCHREST competition. These guys will do anything to gain a .001". Surprised that many of them used volume powder measure.
     
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  15. daboone

    daboone

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    The Classic {now called the Deluxe) is my favorite of these bench mounted measures I have on my bench; Harrells, Hornady LNL, Quick Measure, 55, B&M, Lee Autodrum and Autodisk..

    Seriously the Lee Deluxe is as precise and consistant and easier the set up and use and just better than the Harrells. By far the best bench Measure I've used and it's the lowest priced too.