Garand Experts, please help

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by iowashooter, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. iowashooter

    iowashooter

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    I am very new to the Garand game, I am getting a Winchester Garand (receiver is marked Winchester), I'm sure the gun has several different makers parts in it. I would like to get it all Winchester. How many different parts are marked by the maker on a Garand? How hard is it to get all the parts from one maker? Any additional information would be greatly appreciated
     
  2. Jon_R

    Jon_R

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    Almost all of the parts are marked by the manufacturer but they should probably not all be Winchester if you are trying to get it back to its original configuration. Lots of subs made parts sent them to the main manufacturers for assembly into rifles. Then most rifles where rebuilt at least once. That involves stripping down the rifle tossing worn parts and grab new ones out of the bins.

    Check out the forum over at cmp

    http://www.thecmp.org

    Unless you got very lucky your rifle will be a mix of parts and it will take a lot of effort to find the correct parts. Keep in mind you can take that rifle and have a lot of fun shooting targets as is. :)

    The big parts are the receiver, barrel, op rod, and trigger group assembly. You have a Win receiver. The barrel is marked under the rear handguard. If you pull the bolt back you can usually tell from there it should have a manufacturer code and date. Such as SA-53 That would be Springfield Armory 1953. The op rod should have a code on it to. If you pull the trigger group out it should have a part number and manufacturer code on the side. Also most everything in the trigger assembly will also have a code and such.

    The you have stocks and cartouches, etc.....

    Restoration is a big thing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2010

  3. Gary7

    Gary7

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    I think everything on the Garand with the exception of the stock, springs, and the sights and maybe the gas plug will be marked by the manufacturer.
     
  4. byf43

    byf43 NRA Patron Life Member

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    I'm no expert on the M1 Garand, but, I suppose you could/would spend a substantial amount of $$$ trying to 'force match' a Winchester Garand.

    A good friend had a book that (IF memory serves me) showed what the proper markings (drawing #s) that each serial number/manufacturer block had.

    As for barrel markings, when I received my Springfield Armory M1 Garand, there was NO markings visible after pulling the op-rod back.
    After removing the rear handguard, I saw some peculiar markings.
    I saw this:
    M
    A
    R
    L
    I
    N​


    :wow:

    Yup! Marlin was a supplier to Springfield Armory. The last time that my rifle had been re-built was at Springfield Armory, in September, 1967.
    It was shipped to me, from Anniston Army Depot by the DCM, in January, 1985.

    Don't worry about trying to make your rifle a 'matching parts' rifle.
    Enjoy it as it is, and use that money to get some M2 Ball, and take the old girl out for a dance!
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2010
  5. AZ Jeff

    AZ Jeff

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    If you do decide to try to make your Winchester "all original", you should pick up Scott Duff's books on the M1. His publications are the best guide to trying to piece together the correct parts for "as originally manufactured".

    Be forewarned--it could be expensive and time consuming to create this animal.
     
  6. Gary7

    Gary7

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    But an interesting and worthwhile project, nonetheless.

    I'm fortunate that the M1C my dad left me is "all Springfield" with the exception of the G&H scope mount--but that's what was put on at the armory. It wasn't until the M1D that Springfield designed their own scope mount.
     
  7. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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    Depending on what parts match, and what year the rifle was made you could be looking at over 2000 dollars to restore the rifle. Winchester was only made during WW2 and was a low number producer so the parts are harder to find. The stock alone could go for 600 plus dollars.
     
  8. den308

    den308 NOT A COOK

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    A buddy of mine has a rifle numbered bellow 50,000, making it an original gas trap receiver. Cost to restore, over $5,000.
     
  9. AZ Jeff

    AZ Jeff

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    And that would be using mostly REPRODUCTION gas trap parts. Some of the original pieces are not available at ANY price.
     
  10. den308

    den308 NOT A COOK

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    That is why the Blue Sky barrel is used for propping up tomato plants and the rest was converted into a N.M. M-1 Garand, kept in .30-06. If he does hit lotto though, gas trap will happen.