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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day all,
I really want to make sure its operator error and not the firearm as I recently purchased (11.24.2021) and fired the day after. First round was good second was stuck in a half loading in the barrel position. had to pull the slide back then try again. It fired one again then back to the same. I also noticed that I squeezed the trigger and nothing happened. to be honest though a trainer came over and had no issues. I fired with 9 mm rounds blazers 115 grain but purchased same brand with 124 grain. I had no issues with my 124 grain. I am still questioning as I am a bit off if I should have purchased the P320 Sig. please can anyone advise me some. I am gonna go back to the gun store tomorrow in the event I don't receive a reply. Thanks in advance.
 

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It’s called “a failure to feed” not a “jam”. Your description accurately described it.

Perhaps - and it sounds like it - limp wristing (allowing yourself wrist to flex during recoil). Lock your wrists in position.


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Good day all,
I really want to make sure its operator error and not the firearm as I recently purchased (11.24.2021) and fired the day after. First round was good second was stuck in a half loading in the barrel position. had to pull the slide back then try again. It fired one again then back to the same. I also noticed that I squeezed the trigger and nothing happened. to be honest though a trainer came over and had no issues. I fired with 9 mm rounds blazers 115 grain but purchased same brand with 124 grain. I had no issues with my 124 grain. I am still questioning as I am a bit off if I should have purchased the P320 Sig. please can anyone advise me some. I am gonna go back to the gun store tomorrow in the event I don't receive a reply. Thanks in advance.
From Glock Armorer’s Manual

Observed Problem – Failure to feed

Probable Causes -
  1. Weak magazine spring
  2. Weak recoil spring
  3. Underpowered ammunition
  4. Shooting with an unlocked wrist
  5. Dirty Chamber
  6. Dirty magazine
  7. Tight Extractor
  8. Magazine not properly inserted
  9. Deformed magazine (magazine sides or lips deformed)

    These are not exclusive. At least a good place to start "trouble-shooting".
I agree with the above posts - most likely #4 based on your shooting account.
 

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Go to YouTube and search “Glock limp wrist” and you can learn a lot.

if someone experienced shot it with no issues, that would be my starting point. Clean you gun, put a little oil on it, and get a good grip and some training. You’ll be fine.
Agree that this is a good starting point. Particularly if someone such as the trainer mentioned had no issues. This isn't meant to sound harsh on you OP, it is a fairly common thing with some folks new to Glock. Simply re-evaluate your grip.

In regards to the Sig P320, I like them but would never prefer one over a G45. And no, I'm not a Glock fan boy, lol. Just an honest evaluation of each platform. The P320 has been plagued with issues from the onset, not so with the G45. Just look at your grip, give it a good cleaning, but something like Rigg's Universal Gun Grease on the rails and a drop of oil in the other recommended spots and you should be GTG.

Welcome to GT. :)
 

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Guns jam sometimes. Lube the gun, go back to the store, and have the guy that had no problems shoot the gun again. When he has no problems again, duplicate EXACTLY what he did, and problem will likely be solved.

As a trainer I can tell you that no matter your level of experience, EVERYONE can benefit from shelling out the cash for at least two hours of one on one instruction with a professional instructor. Internet forums and YouTube are okay starter points, but will NEVER beat professional hands on instruction

Best of luck. G45 is an excellent gun, one of my favorites, so much so, I own two of them.


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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Agree that this is a good starting point. Particularly if someone such as the trainer mentioned had no issues. This isn't meant to sound harsh on you OP, it is a fairly common thing with some folks new to Glock. Simply re-evaluate your grip.

In regards to the Sig P320, I like them but would never prefer one over a G45. And no, I'm not a Glock fan boy, lol. Just an honest evaluation of each platform. The P320 has been plagued with issues from the onset, not so with the G45. Just look at your grip, give it a good cleaning, but something like Rigg's Universal Gun Grease on the rails and a drop of oil in the other recommended spots and you should be GTG.

Welcome to GT. :)
appreciate it. I will let the store have a check, one of the magazine has a light rattle but the others are okay. I owned a Smith and Wesson before (M and P) but was used so I have to admit I didn't think I should have cleaned before my first fire. I really appreciate your speedy response. thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guns jam sometimes. Lube the gun, go back to the store, and have the guy that had no problems shoot the gun again. When he has no problems again, duplicate EXACTLY what he did, and problem will likely be solved.

As a trainer I can tell you that no matter your level of experience, EVERYONE can benefit from shelling out the cash for at least two hours of one on one instruction with a professional instructor. Internet forums and YouTube are okay starter points, but will NEVER beat professional hands on instruction

Best of luck. G45 is an excellent gun, one of my favorites, so much so, I own two of them.


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thank you
 

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to be honest though a trainer came over and had no issues..
^^^^ unfortunately for you, that says it all, loud and clear.

Think of picking up a bagpipe for the first time...one would be wise to get instruction, rather than just watching a parade and thinking one could do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
From Glock Armorer’s Manual

Observed Problem – Failure to feed

Probable Causes -
  1. Weak magazine spring
  2. Weak recoil spring
  3. Underpowered ammunition
  4. Shooting with an unlocked wrist
  5. Dirty Chamber
  6. Dirty magazine
  7. Tight Extractor
  8. Magazine not properly inserted
  9. Deformed magazine (magazine sides or lips deformed)

    These are not exclusive. At least a good place to start "trouble-shooting".
I agree with the above posts - most likely #4 based on your shooting account.
appreciate it. I will let the store have a check, one of the magazine has a light rattle but the others are okay. Spot on and a bit embarrassing lol (Newbie to Glock blues I guess), I owned a Smith and Wesson before (M and P) but was used so I have to admit I didn't think I should have cleaned before my first fire. I really appreciate your speedy response.
thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
^^^^ unfortunately for you, that says it all, loud and clear.

Think of picking up a bagpipe for the first time...one would be wise to get instruction, rather than just watching a parade and thinking one could do it.
I will take that... gonna be good.. just wait..
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Go to YouTube and search “Glock limp wrist” and you can learn a lot.

if someone experienced shot it with no issues, that would be my starting point. Clean you gun, put a little oil on it, and get a good grip and some training. You’ll be fine.
Thank you
 

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appreciate it. I will let the store have a check, one of the magazine has a light rattle but the others are okay. I owned a Smith and Wesson before (M and P) but was used so I have to admit I didn't think I should have cleaned before my first fire. I really appreciate your speedy response. thank you
I always clean new guns before shooting. Allows me to inspect for anything that could be wrong (unlikely), but a lot of guns leave factories with preservatives to prevent rusting, maybe not so much lubrication for shooting. I like to know what my guns are oiled with so I know they should function properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I always clean new guns before shooting. Allows me to inspect for anything that could be wrong (unlikely), but a lot of guns leave factories with preservatives to prevent rusting, maybe not so much lubrication for shooting. I like to know what my guns are oiled with so I know they should function properly.
noted...
 

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Don't shoot it out of the box. Take it home, strip, light clean, light oil. Then take it shootin'. Firm, but relaxed grip. In control, but not a shaking death grip. Let the recoil do it's thing, but in a controlled manner. Support hand is as important as the dominant hand.
 

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Many of today's 9mm pistols come with recoil/guide rod springs that are a little heavier/stiffer than yesteryears guns. The reason is, today's self defense rounds are fairly hot loads that make the 9mm a little more effective for their intended use - stopping a human target when needed. The way the bullets expand on target have been improved too - giving good expansion while enough penetration to reach vital organs also.

Today's heavier springs handle the hotter loads better, reducing the amount of beating the frame takes while the pistol cycles the upper slide back and forth cycling new rounds into the chamber. Those heavier springs also demands that the shooter have a little firmer grip while using 115 grain target type bullets. Typical range/target ammo doesn't cycle the slide back with as much force as 124 grain bullets. Usually, the higher grain bullet means a little more recoil energy. I am certain your grip needs to have a little firmer locking of the wrists while you shoot. Your pistol is fine - And this may explain why in past experiences shooting, you may not have had this problem - I'm guessing you were shooting a more old school pistol with springs not as heavy as today's guns have.

Not to worry about your Glock - Your next shooting outing will go fine now that you know this. Also, after a couple hundred rounds fired, that spring will break in a little bit, and won't be quite as susceptible to "limp wristing". Congratulations on your new pistol ! You've made a great purchase, and your doubts will go away after your next shooting session. You made a good decision to come to this forum and seek advice. I commend you on your efforts ! Keep us posted, and let us know how your next outing goes. Welcome to the Forum and hope we hear from you as you progress in your shooting skills. : )
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Many of today's 9mm pistols come with recoil/guide rod springs that are a little heavier/stiffer than yesteryears guns. The reason is, today's self defense rounds are fairly hot loads that make the 9mm a little more effective for their intended use - stopping a human target when needed. The way the bullets expand on target have been improved too - giving good expansion while enough penetration to reach vital organs also.

Today's heavier springs handle the hotter loads better, reducing the amount of beating the frame takes while the pistol cycles the upper slide back and forth cycling new rounds into the chamber. Those heavier springs also demands that the shooter have a little firmer grip while using 115 grain target type bullets. Typical range/target ammo doesn't cycle the slide back with as much force as 124 grain bullets. Usually, the higher grain bullet means a little more recoil energy. I am certain your grip needs to have a little firmer locking of the wrists while you shoot. Your pistol is fine - And this may explain why in past experiences shooting, you may not have had this problem - I'm guessing you were shooting a more old school pistol with springs not as heavy as today's guns have.

Not to worry about your Glock - Your next shooting outing will go fine now that you know this. Also, after a couple hundred rounds fired, that spring will break in a little bit, and won't be quite as susceptible to "limp wristing". Congratulations on your new pistol ! You've made a great purchase, and your doubts will go away after your next shooting session. You made a good decision to come to this forum and seek advice. I commend you on your efforts ! Keep us posted, and let us know how your next outing goes. Welcome to the Forum and hope we hear from you as you progress in your shooting skills. : )
Noted. I am going to revisit with the 124 grain. If that’s works steady then I will continue to use that grain or higher. But I am trying to source a dummy round I believe it’s called were it will prevent the firing pin from having issues but I will get my trigger movement better. I could have the name wrong.


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