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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked up me new 42 and put 200 rounds through. I did a complete teardown and cleaned her up. I have a couple of questions on the reassembly. 1)the plastic piece that resides inside the trigger spring has a slanted side and a flat side. Mine has the flat side up. Is that correct. 2) are the slide lock spring and the firing pin safety spring the exact same spring or do I need to keep track of which one goes where. 3)Does the slide lock notch face the rear like it's big brothers.
I always appreciate the help.
 

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1. My similar G43 has the flat side down. Are you saying it came the way yours is or did you reassemble it that way? Looking at the trigger mechanism housing assembly, it's possible it could work either way, but I haven't tried it the other way.

2. Yes, the slide lock spring is the same spring as in the firing pin safety (and also the slide stop) for the G42/43.

3. Yes, the slide lock notch should be rear facing as in other Glocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This one came with the flat side up. I picked it up today and walked into the range. First 4 of 10 failed to feed. Then if I released the trigger slowly to reset,when I pulled it was gritty and just clicked. You have to release it all the way. I went straight home and as soon as I took off the slide, I could tell the trigger group did not look right. I cleaned everything and put the bar in curved side up, but the damage was done. If I hold the trigger in and rack the slide it feels crunchy. Any body else have this happen?
 

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The plastic rod that sits inside the trigger spring has a "straight" side and a slanted side (if you look at them as opposite "sides" of the rod). The slanted side faces UP in the assembled spring assembly.

Another way to check is to look at the complete assembly from either side. The angle of the top-facing rear tip of the plastic rod is roughly at the same slanted angle as the rear of the metal bearing ("rear" meaning as the assembly sits in the gun), right above the small angled tip of the rod as it sticks out of the spring. (The bearing is the hooked metal part that slips over the front cruciform of the trigger bar).

It's also very important that the front of the trigger spring assembly end up snapped into place in the bottom slot of the housing. This requires sliding the front of the plastic rod (in the assembly) down from the top slot.

Now guys, Glock has a warning for armorers, which is that in general, disassembly of the trigger spring is not recommended. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Last I was trained (recert last year), the new-style trigger spring assembly is removed from the housing as a complete assembly, and installed back in it as a complete assembly. (Yes, there's a trick to it, as armorers are taught.) Not removed as disassembled, separate pieces that are then reassembled back together inside the housing.

I don't own a G42/43, but if I did, I'd leave the trigger spring assembly in its assembled configuration, even when doing an armorer disassembly and inspection (unless I saw/suspected something actually wrong with one of the assembly components), and just blow off any residue or fouling.

That's just me, though. I like minimizing the potential for unnecessary, user/owner-caused wear & tear, or damage, of assemblies, by taking them apart when it's not necessary.

If you're concerned about the condition of the assembly, take it to the nearest Glock armorer and have it checked (and replaced, if it's been damaged).

Just my thoughts.
 

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Does the slide lock notch face the rear like its big brothers.
Note that the groove at the top of the Slide Lock engages a similar groove on the bottom front of the barrel lug. If the Slide Lock's groove is facing forward, the barrel lug's groove can never fit into the Slide Lock groove. Results:

1. The impact of the barrel lug with each shot will eventually push the Slide Lock downward, which can allow the entire slide assembly to propel itself forward off of the frame if the firing pin lug rides over the trigger bar cruciform. (Fortunately, that usually doesn't happen and the slide assembly stays on.)

2. Until that happens, the barrel lug groove finds no Slide Lock groove to engage. That reduces the tightness of action lockup in battery and may increase shot dispersion.

When one understands the function of each part, there will be no future uncertainty of how, why, and when they fit together. :)
 
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