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· Brass picker
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715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
okay it is ask the experts time. I read several other threads on this subject and there was a wide range of opinions from "mine has 10,000" and I see no need to change springs" to "absolutely have to change every 3,000 rounds".

My G23 gen 3 has about 5000 rounds through it, mostly reloads and I have had one FTF about 300 rounds ago. No problems since then. I think it is because it did not go all the way into battery due to a reloaded case issue. To satisfy my curiosity I ran it 1,100 rounds of reloads without cleaning the weapon and it never hesitated one time. Not once. Was going to run to failure but just could not stand it any longer so I cleaned it.

What is the recoil spring replacement interval from glock or do they publish that information?

I ordered a set of springs for the 23 & the 19 gen 4 (bought used round count unknown) and have received them. Now I have a complete new set of springs in hand and stand here debating if I should try to fix something that is not broken or if I should wait a while. The spring kit has every spring in the gun so should I replace them all or just the recoil spring? These spring kits were cheap ($25 or so) but I guess I am just a little cheaper and please note that I am currently signing up for a cheapskate therapy group.
 

· Grumpy Old Guy
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11,765 Posts
My opinion, do not mess with what is working. I believe Glock says to change recoil springs on gen3 every 3,000 rounds and gen4 recoil assembly every 5,000 rounds to protect the pistol.
A part may break at any time either new or used so I would have some parts on hand.
 

· Brass picker
Joined
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715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One other question, on this G23 the firing pin safety and the little ears on the lock block are showing a little wear. Both seem to have the chrome (?) coating wearing or flaking off just a bit. Is this normal and should these parts be replaced?
 

· Registered
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3,040 Posts
Glock no longer gives a round count for replacing the RSA but rather says "inspect" (see below for how). It's important to note that the RSA protects the gun from beating itself apart, I've seen the steel locking block break apart from too many rounds fired with a bad RSA. The RSA on a Gen4 is $12 and it's $5 for a Gen3. Seems like really cheap maintenance to just change them out. It's not like you're going to break the bank by replacing more often than needed.

To test the RSA perform the return to battery test:
Clear the gun
Cycle the slide
Point the gun straight up
Pull the trigger and hold it to the rear
Pull the slide to the rear then very SLOWLY walk it back up until you feel the spring tension release - at this point release the slide
The slide should be in full battery - if it is not or moves forward slightly when you release the trigger it has failed to return to battery and the RSA should be replaced. There are other reasons a Glock can fail the return to battery test but replacing the RSA is the first step.
 
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· Brass picker
Joined
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715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Glock no longer gives a round count for replacing the RSA but rather says "inspect" (see below for how). It's important to note that the RSA protects the gun from beating itself apart, I've seen the steel locking block break apart from too many rounds fired with a bad RSA. The RSA on a Gen4 is $12 and it's $5 for a Gen3. Seems like really cheap maintenance to just change them out. It's not like you're going to break the bank by replacing more often than needed.

To test the RSA perform the return to battery test:
Clear the gun
Cycle the slide
Point the gun straight up
Pull the trigger and hold it to the rear
Pull the slide to the rear then very SLOWLY walk it back up until you feel the spring tension release - at this point release the slide
The slide should be in full battery - if it is not or moves forward slightly when you release the trigger it has failed to return to battery and the RSA should be replaced. There are other reasons a Glock can fail the return to battery test but replacing the RSA is the first step.

Exactly the type of response I was hoping to get. You have educated me. Thank you.
 
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