close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

G21 recoil question

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by rOOster1, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. rOOster1

    rOOster1

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Hello everyone got a quick question. I went to a gun shop yesterday guy had a G21 3 gen priced right night sites and a stainless guide rod for $375 went back today bought the gun was telling the owner of the store if he got any more G21s in let me know cause i dont like nite sights and told him i would trade him for stock sights and a few bucks he agreed then said he had a 17 of his own he would trade me sights i told him the sights on a 17 wouldnt fit a 21 he replies i didnt know that. When i got home i noticed the gun had a regular guide rod in it but it feels weak like a 17 0r 22 recoil spring is there a difference in the 17 or 22 guide rod and the 21 or will a 17 or 22 rod fit in a 21or is there any way to tell if its a 21 rod and spring? I dont wanna shoot it till i find out for sure and the owner is on vacation for 3 weeks.
     
  2. faawrenchbndr

    faawrenchbndr CLM

    Messages:
    38,692
    Likes Received:
    3,506
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    east of East St Louis
    look at the end of the guide rod,.....what is the part number?
     

  3. rOOster1

    rOOster1

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    part #5600 And there is a 1 stamped on opposite side
     
  4. SDGlock23

    SDGlock23 Homunculus

    Messages:
    6,931
    Likes Received:
    533
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    There is a physical size difference in the G21 guide rod and the G17/G22/G31 guide rod, so as long as it fits, you'll have no problems. The G21 shoots great with the stock guide rod!
     
  5. rOOster1

    rOOster1

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Great thats what i needed to know. thank you
     
  6. faawrenchbndr

    faawrenchbndr CLM

    Messages:
    38,692
    Likes Received:
    3,506
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    east of East St Louis
    Yep,...you're good to go.
    If you think it may be weak, you could always just replace it
     
  7. rOOster1

    rOOster1

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    great i just wanted to make sure i could b it just feels weak compared to my G30 lol will shoot it tomorrow thank you again
     
  8. JonInWA

    JonInWA

    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    33
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Location:
    Auburn, Washington
    First, rOOster1, welcome to the fourm. There are a lot of very helpful participants here.

    OK, now to your specific questions: First, the G21 and the G17 do use a different recoil spring assembly/spring; field-strip your G21, and on the back of the guide rod flange, you'll see some numbers molded into it. The correct number for a G21 is "5600" (and if it's a newer recoil spring assembly, there may be an additional number "1" opposite the 4-digit number).

    If the number is anything other than "5600," I'd strongly suggest NOT shooting the gun until you get the right recoil spring assembly. While they're inexpensive, and easily obtainable from aftermarket outfits like Lone Wolf Distributors, simply calling Glock at (770) 432-1202 and asking for Customer Service/Technical Support will in all liklihood result in them simply shipping you the correct recoil spring assembly at no charge. The proper Glock part number is SP 05586 (and no, I have absolutely no reason why the part number and the imprinted numbers are different).

    Second, while a Glock G17 sight will fit into G21, there are a number of reasons why you probably don't want to go that route: First, the standard rear sight for a G21 is the 6.9mm high sight; the standard rear sight for the G17 is the 6.5mm high sight. To achieve an identical Point of Impact/Point of Aim, most G21s should use...the 6.9mm rear sight. On the right side of the 6.9mm Glock sight you'll see a long "dash" with a shorter "dash" superimposed above it. The 6.5mm sight will simply have the one long "dash" on the sight's side. Second, it's probably not the world's greatest idea to use a previously installed rear sight, as there are fairly good odds that it'll be a bit loose in the dovetail, especially if it's a Glock polymer rear sight, whose dovetail integrity is dependant upon a thin steel plate underneath the sight, which in all liklihood has been compressed and deformed when being taken off the original Glock it was installed on. Glock sights are dirt cheap-just get new ones; better yet, get a set of steel ones.

    Lastly, unless you really, really know what your doing with switching the OEM recoil spring assembly for an aftermarket steel one, I'd just stick with the OEM one. While a truly knowledgeable competitior can get performance benefits from carefully matching aftermarket springs/aftermarket recoil spring guides with specifically configured ammunition selections, most of us aren't in this niche-and switching/screwing around with the recoil spring assembly will likely be a major cause of inducing interesting operational abnormalities.

    I hope all this helps-and congratulations on your G21-it's a great gun.

    Best, Jon
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010
  9. rOOster1

    rOOster1

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    wow thank you for the information now i know some of the things to look for on my next used purchase. thank you again
     
  10. JonInWA

    JonInWA

    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    33
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Location:
    Auburn, Washington
    I see that faawrenchbndr beat me to the punch! However, one other thing; since I assume that the gun is used, one of the things that I automatically do with any used gun that I acquire is to immediately replace the recoil spring (in this case, the recoil spring assembly) and usually the magazine springs. Glock's guidance on the recoil spring replacement interval is every 3,000 rounds; if you don't know how much the gun was used, or how it was used/what strength rounds were fired through it, simply replacing the recoil spring assembly with a brand new one is cheap insurance.

    Also-unless you know for a fact that no lead bullets were fired through your barrel, assume that they were, and that there may be some potentially catastrophic lead smear build-up in the barrel; before use, I'd strongly suggest THOROUGHLY cleaning the barrel-and for that matter, properly cleaning and lubing the gun before use is always a good idea on any new acquisition, both brand new or used. It's especially critical regarding a Glock barrel due to it's polygonal rifling, where residual lead build-up can result in an over-pressure situation, resulting in whats commonly called a "kaboom." It's a form of drama best avoided.

    Best, Jon
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2010