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G-19 Gen3 and G-23 gen 3 powder choice

700 Views 8 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  WeeWilly
I have the following powders: 700X, 800X, Longshot, Bullseye, clay competition,Win 296 and SR 4756. I have not found any data as of yet on Bullseye or Clay competition. Longshot seems to be a favorite but what about the rest? Data seems different from the books ( Hornaday Speer and Lyman) than from the Powder Manufactures. What say you to this en-devour in which I am going to undertake? (other than don't :supergrin:)
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Hold off until you reconcile the discrepancies between data in the manuals and powder manufacturers. How different are they? They're not often exactly the same, but they shouldn't be that far apart either. If they are, you might be looking at them wrong.

Of the powders you mention, Bullseye is the only one I have experience with. I like it for cast bullets in 45 acp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hold off until you reconcile the discrepancies between data in the manuals and powder manufacturers. How different are they? They're not often exactly the same, but they shouldn't be that far apart either. If they are, you might be looking at them wrong.

Of the powders you mention, Bullseye is the only one I have experience with. I like it for cast bullets in 45 acp.
Example: Hornaday 9th edition: Hornaday 180gr xtp, Longshot 4.8 to 6.9gr. Hodgdon Hornaday 180gr. xtp, Longshot, 6.5 to 8gr. That is 26% difference on the low end and 14% difference on the high end. Perhaps I am over thinking this but I just need to be safe, by doing this the proper way. Thanks for the reply
 

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Example: Hornaday 9th edition: Hornaday 180gr xtp, Longshot 4.8 to 6.9gr. Hodgdon Hornaday 180gr. xtp, Longshot, 6.5 to 8gr. That is 26% difference on the low end and 14% difference on the high end. Perhaps I am over thinking this but I just need to be safe, by doing this the proper way. Thanks for the reply
If you don't have a chronograph, you are at a disadvantage. I would expect to be able to drive that 180 gr bullet to 950 fps like the Hornady load. That might be ambitious so perhaps 900 fps.

Then I would load a couple at 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5 and maybe 7.0 and see where they clocked. ETA: Then I would go back and make further subdivisions: 6.0, 6.2, 6.4, 6.6 - that kind of thing.

I won't be using the same powder as Hornady and that's a good reason to back down a little from their velocity.

Since I am never loading hunting or SD ammo, velocity is meaningless. I need to have certain minimum velocities for various competitions but 700 fps is adequate for 'minor' and that's pretty slow. 'Major' needs about 920 fps plus a bit to make sure it is never disqualified so 930 fps would be just about right.

Longshot is a very slow pistol powder so it should be capable of pretty good velocities if the barrel is long enough. I don't use it myself but quite a few people do. I wonder what it looks like at night when using a G27...

Richard
 

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I doubt you're going to find any use for 296 in those pistols. I use it (the H110 version) for .30 carbine...and AFAIK, it's useful in .357mag. I've experimented with Loudshot :) in 9mm, and it works, even at the lower end of its powder range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I doubt you're going to find any use for 296 in those pistols. I use it (the H110 version) for .30 carbine...and AFAIK, it's useful in .357mag. I've experimented with Loudshot :) in 9mm, and it works, even at the lower end of its powder range.
I found some data for the 296 for .40 cal, I may not use it except as a back up thanks for the reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you don't have a chronograph, you are at a disadvantage. I would expect to be able to drive that 180 gr bullet to 950 fps like the Hornady load. That might be ambitious so perhaps 900 fps.

Then I would load a couple at 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5 and maybe 7.0 and see where they clocked. ETA: Then I would go back and make further subdivisions: 6.0, 6.2, 6.4, 6.6 - that kind of thing.

I won't be using the same powder as Hornady and that's a good reason to back down a little from their velocity.

Since I am never loading hunting or SD ammo, velocity is meaningless. I need to have certain minimum velocities for various competitions but 700 fps is adequate for 'minor' and that's pretty slow. 'Major' needs about 920 fps plus a bit to make sure it is never disqualified so 930 fps would be just about right.

Longshot is a very slow pistol powder so it should be capable of pretty good velocities if the barrel is long enough. I don't use it myself but quite a few people do. I wonder what it looks like at night when using a G27...

Richard
Good Information, I do have a chronograph. I will handload for target practice. I have factory xtp for SD. I want to first develop a load to match as close as possible to factory,( within pressure and velocity parameters), then if needed, for accuracy (target shooting). My G-19 barrel is around 5" and has a 2 port compensater, so even being smaller than my Sons G-23, it should still be a good show at night and perhaps just as loud.
 

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800x works good in both calibers, but big flakes, meters crappy, and I've noticed when used for 9mm that it fills the case about 80% and on a progressive press some hops out when changing stations and gets messy...lol.

SR 4756 works good in both calibers but I don't have too much experience with it.

Not on your list, but WSF is also good for both and meters well and not as flashy or loud as Longshot.

I also like AA #5 and #7 for 9mm and .40, but it's been really hard to find any the past year or two.

I'm looking to get some CFE Pistol to try out. From the data I've seen it looks like it works well aslo.
 

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I have found the Hornaday books to be the least reliable of any of the big boys. All of the powder manufacturers are where I start if they have load data for the caliber and bullet I want to load. Speer is right there with the powder boys. I am not saying I would not use the Hornaday data, it is just that I have found some of the largest variations from the powder manufacturers data with some calibers.

In those calibers, 700x and Clays will give you some great low recoil target loads, Bullseye a step up in velocity to the mid-range, 800x and Longshot will deliver the service caliber velocities +, both have a lot of flash and boom, not ideal for SD loads, but fine for practice.
 
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