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FTO aint all its cracked up to be....

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by cowboywannabe, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. cowboywannabe

    cowboywannabe you savvy?

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    in fact its a pain in the keister.

    its hot as hell and im in the jump seat. no room for my Cool-Cop, takes a lot longer to cool down since i dont have it installed and cant hog the A/C vents all to myself....plus having to run to every call for the new guy's exposure.....plus having to do my shift supervisor admin work, plus running the city jail, having to log onto a different computor to my admin profile to check reports, plus day shift, well errand ***** is more the term for the work done.....

    im finished *****ing.

    thanks.:wavey:
     
  2. RussP

    RussP Super Moderator Moderator

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    Well, as has been advised by many who know your job better than you, "If you can't stand the pressure, if you're not up to taking the heat, then find another damn job!!!"

    :animlol: Sorry, I HAD TO!!! :animlol:
     

  3. cowboywannabe

    cowboywannabe you savvy?

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    FTO was fun on nights and in the winter when i was a patrolman, but as a Sgt. this blows! i wish i had a choice but i get the trainees that have "problems" to see if they are the problem or their previous FTO.
     
  4. Morris

    Morris CLM

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    I have managed to go 16 years without being pointed/directed/strongly encouraged to be a FTO.

    Have the academy in November . . . after being pointed to/directed by/strongly encourage to attend.

    This should be fun. :)
     
  5. jolly roger

    jolly roger

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    I was an FTO for 9 years. With a couple of newbies it was some of the worst stress I have ever endured as a Police Officer. It ain't for everybody...At least our department listened to us when one needed canning. The documentation required when you have a problem child is extreme. I'd rather be in charge of a major homicide frankly...
     
  6. collim1

    collim1 Shower Time!

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    I hate training. I am a notorious perfectionist. It is tough for me to allow someone to make mistakes for the sake of learning. I tend to take over and push the rookie aside, which is counter productive to the training process.

    I do however enjoy the company, especially on night shift.
     
  7. 361cop

    361cop

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    I totally agree that being and Sgt and FTO really blow chunks.

    IMO Sgt's should not be FTO's. We are already over whelemed with daily duties as it is.

    I have a trainee right now and since I am day shift supervisor, it's very hard to get time to go on the road with all the 'tasks' given by higher ups.

    Then they have the guts to ask when is the trainee going to get cut loose, argh!!!!
     
  8. DaBigBR

    DaBigBR No Infidels!

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    I've done a fair amount of training, but have never been to a formal FTO school. I'm also something of a perfectionist and I think that the absolute most difficult thing to do is just sit there and watch them **** up.
     
  9. Goldstar225

    Goldstar225 NRA member

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    I'm the field training coordinator for my agency. I said it before I had the position and I'll say it now, a good FTO is more important to the development of a new officer than any other person in the department. Most people can teach the "routine", the right FTO can teach them how to be a cop. So far we've had good support for the FTO's, the rookies who can't or shouldn't be in the job have been weeded out. My biggest problem is that my best FTO's keep getting promoted or moved to special assignments. That's as it should be but I hate to see them go, they molded some good young officers.

    Cowboywannabe I can relate, it's tough supervising and training at the same time. Our Sergeants used to do the check ride. That's in the past now, the FTO's conduct the checkrides.
     
  10. Agent6-3/8

    Agent6-3/8

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    No doubt its a tough gig. I know when I was on FTO I ways felt sort of bad for "old dad" as I created a lot of extra work for him. :supergrin:



    I have to say though, one of my career goals is to be a training officer. You can't save the world, but I think we all want to be able to look back on our lives and careers and know we've done some good along the way. In the grand scheme of things, mentoring and creating good officers is one of the most rewarding things one can do. The academy may give a rookie the basic technical skills to be a police officer, but its the FTO role to teach them how to be a cop. A department is only as good as its training officers.
     
  11. Yarddog(1)

    Yarddog(1)

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    Is it worth the EXTRA $100 a month??
    Y/D
     
  12. RetailNinja

    RetailNinja

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    I was too awesome on FTO to NRT, so I think that at least two of my FTOs were looking for places to dump my body.

    I can be hard on a supervisor.
     
  13. Cav

    Cav

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    My agency pays nothing extra for being an FTO. You get a week of training out of it, thats what you get, and a little more overtime to finish reports (an hour maybe).

    The deal where I work for the FTO is the first few weeks are all in house training. The field work starts on the 3rd week, that third week is two weeks of the FTO showing the rookie how its done nd slowly letting the rookie take over. By the 7th week a supervisor should just be a passenger, observing or evaluating.

    Trick is get a few reports, and while the rookie works on his stuff, you work on your stuff.

    At my work the supervisor can pick most of the calls. Get with dispatch, and take the simple reports, or go for the major crimes. IMHO a supervisor should not have a rookie untill at least 7 weeks into training (or just do evals). By then the rookie should have an idea of what they are doing and you dont get caught up doing as much work.

    But at my job we have have more than one supervisor on a shift and can pass some of our duties if training.
     
  14. Morris

    Morris CLM

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    Ouch. At least our contract specifies that while you serve as an FTO, you get an extra 5% pay. It was developed to encourage good folks to put in for it and to compensate some small way for all the extra paperwork, headaches and so on.

    It took some time but we've developed a solid program that actually does a very good job at weeding out folks. To my chief's credit, if FTOs collectively recommend that someone be bounced, he will support the decision. The key is honest FTO evaluations and assessments. In the past, some have not been which has led to some unpleasantness.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2011
  15. rookie1

    rookie1

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    I also would like to be an FTO some day. I m not even close to having enough time on to put in for it but in a few years I'll put in for it. Our department used to give $5 a day for a FTO with a probationer. Now its slightly over $20 a day. With about 19+ work days a month thats around $380 a month. Some say its worth it, some say its not even close. Some day.
     
  16. Sharkey

    Sharkey

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    FTO for 3 years and I gotta say, I really enjoyed it. We didn't get paid extra and we weren't supervisors though we could be an acting supervisor if they were short handed and we didn't have a recruit.

    I think it is pretty important and took it pretty seriously. I left for another gig and when we had another opening, I reached out to my old dept. and got one of my old recruits hired on. It was funny, he was twice my size and said every time he got in the squad, I scared the crap out of him. :rofl:

    I had one guy fall asleep on days the first day of training and he came from another agency. I was hot. I told the FTO Sgt. that we could probably find better. They kept him and he is marginal at best. Oh well.........
     
  17. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    I was an FTO for a total of six years and 33 trainees. It was one of the most rewarding things I've ever done in my life, and one of the most stressful. The payoff is when one of my former trainees becomes a detective or becomes an FTO himself, or just makes a great case against some crook. I made some close friendships that are there for life, and that is worth hundreds of times the cost in stress and late nights.
     
  18. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    :rofl::rofl:



    F T O ?? Feed This Officer ?
     
  19. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    FTO=
    For
    The
    Overtime
     
  20. JC2317

    JC2317

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    I was a FTO for several classes, almost two full years. Although the first few weeks of each class were rough, it was the most rewarding experience I had while on the job. I agree, it is the most important part of the job. The academy does not teach a young officer to be a "Cop", FTO's and senior officers who give a damn do. I have had the privelege of seeing some of my baby faced rookies go on to become detectives, bomb squad techs, narcotics investigators and supervisors.

    It is the part of the job I miss the most.