FTF in my stock Glock 22!!!!

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by BlindBoyJoe, Jul 14, 2002.

  1. BlindBoyJoe

    BlindBoyJoe

    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2002
    Location:
    Western United States
    I have a glock 22 that is about 7 months old and I love it. I have never had a problem with it until today. I went the range and noticed that once and a while my last round wouldn't feed into the chamber. The slide would lock back and the last round would be sitting there looking at me still in the magazine. I have 5 magazines that I am rotating pretty often. FWIW I do put a little oil on the chamber ramp. Do you think that my mag springs are bad? Recoil spring is bad? Am I limp wristing (never had problem before). Any info is appreciated!!;b
     
  2. Ian11

    Ian11

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 22, 2000
    Location:
    Los Angeles, Ca, USA
    Everything in and around the chamber should be dry. The oil simply accumulates powder charge and does not make the weapon operate more smoothly. What it will do is cause your Glock to FTF, jam and other unpleasantries.
     

  3. BlindBoyJoe

    BlindBoyJoe

    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2002
    Location:
    Western United States
    Thanks for the reply. After cleaning my gun yesterday, I made sure that all chamber/barrel surfaces were dry. Does anyone else have any insight on this problem I had? If I ever have to use my glock in a real world situation, I want to make sure that it works flawless!!!
     
  4. Duck of Death

    Duck of Death

    Messages:
    2,625
    Likes Received:
    242
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2002
    Location:
    Big Sky Country
    Make sure the spring on the slide stop lever is 1/2" to the right of the lever and slightly down. When installed the slide stop lever should snap down briskly when raised and released. Go to www.glockmart.com and scroll to parts for a look at the slide stop lever. I hope this helps.
     
  5. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

    Messages:
    7,059
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 1999
    Location:
    Montanuh
    Agreed, don't oil anything near the chamber. Also, you could be gripping the gun such that YOU are engaging the slide stop lever by accident. This happens from time to time. Check your grip, do you have a thumb or anything near the slide stop lever?

    Koski
     
  6. Cinic

    Cinic Spongy Member

    Messages:
    2,003
    Likes Received:
    198
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2001
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    My wife is having the same problem with her 27. The slide sometimes locks back with one round left in the mag. I can't blame her thumb because it's always at the same point. I'm about to start replacing mag parts. Although I can't understand the mechanics of how the mag could be causing this problem.

    I'll check the slide stop lever as the Duck recommended.

    Any other ideas?

    John
     
  7. fastbolt

    fastbolt

    Messages:
    16,214
    Likes Received:
    9,577
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Location:
    CA Central Coast
    A couple of questions ...

    If you examine your slide stop under strong light, do you see any copper jacketing evident on the end of the slide stop protrusion where it normally engages the magazine follower when the magazine is empty?

    And, does it happen more with one type of bullet shape, or ogive, or ammunition brand and bullet weight, than another?

    If so, you might be experiencing a condition where the bullet shape & width of the ammunition you're using is just wide enough that it touches the slide stop protrusion under recoil, while a round is moving upward, and engages the slide stop, locking the slide open.

    Also, if you notice it occuring when the magazine spring is almost completely decompressed, such as with only one or two rounds remaining in the magazine, a related condition could be contributing to it. That related condition would be the recoil forces causing the heavier part of the ammunition, the bullet, to "wiggle" ... and that bullet nose movement might be enough to allow it to touch the slide stop protrusion, but mostly when the spring strength is at a level just "weak" enough (due to decompression) to allow more bullet wiggle in the magazine.

    A different bullet ogive, a different brand, bullet style or weight, would change these dynamics. You might notice this occuring more with one type of bullet shape or weight, or ogive, than another ... If this is the case, it's more of an ammunition problem than a pistol problem. Firearms manufacturers can't predict every variance that might occur with ammunition produced by all of the different ammunition manufacturers. Just look at the brass case dimension differences, and the primer depth and sensitivity issues, that arise from time to time.

    And believe it or not, one firearm manufacturer's engineering research of a similar condition, using high speed video, determined it was more likely to occur with left handed shooters. But that's another story ...

    I first learned of it when I became an armorer for another make of pistol. I was told by other experienced armorers, and armorer instructors, that it was more often encountered in narrow single column magazines. The cause was generally either the bullet ogive being slightly out of spec with a particular brand of ammunition, making the bullet nose just too wide at the wrong point for the particular magazine, pistol, slide stop combination ... Or, the slide stop was slightly out of spec in regard to the depth the slide stop protrusion reached into the slide stop cut-out in the magazine body, causing it to occasionally be engaged by a rising bullet nose at some point.

    An adjustment to the slide stop was suggested to correct one such problem, but as with all such "solutions, if done incorrectly it could cause other problems, and you have to buy a new part. It's best left to an armorer. Although, if new parts were already available to the armorer, simply replacing the part with another would often correct the condition, tolerances being what they are with mass produced parts, even CNC parts. Tolerance "stack-up" can still allow for problems in even the most finely produced weapons. They're still machines, after all ...

    If you're not unintentionally engaging the slide stop during the recoil cycle with your thumb, consider changing ammunition and maybe the magazine spring to see if this makes a difference. If it doesn't, consider having the pistol inspected by a Glock armorer.

    I'm not telling anyone that this is the cause of your problems. Not by a long shot (oops, no pun intended, honest). It's just that at different times I've personally encountered this situation in a couple pistol models using both single and double column magazines, and I know how frustrating it can be to diagnose peculiar problems.

    Also, does this occur more with any particular magazine?

    By the way, while qualifying someone once, I saw a shooter's magazine repeatedly dropping from the pistol during firing. The shooter swore he wasn't touching the magazine release button, and looking at his hands while not shooting, I agreed no part of his was hands were touching anywhere near the release button. (He was right handed.) When I had him fire while I was watching, however, to my surprise I saw his left thumb move over and push the button during the recoil cycle. He was one of those shooters that positioned his thumbs with his left one crossing over his right one, like he was holding his right thumb down, so to speak. His thumb did move under recoil, though, and he just wasn't aware of it since his thumb returned to the previous position after recoil.

    I hadn't seen that much movement in a shooter's thumb in quite that manner ... and to his misfortune, his grip combined with his hand size, and the recoil of the pistol, was just "right" to cause his thumb to push the magazine button with sufficient authority to release the magazine. He just couldn't feel it during recoil. He didn't believe he was doing it until he did it a couple more times, and it stopped happening when I convinced him to try changing his thumb position.

    Sometimes it's the pistol ... and then sometimes it's the shooter.

    Oh yeah, like everyone said ... don't apply lubricant near the feed ramp or chamber. It's not only unnecessary, it's a bad idea ...

    I apologize for the long post ...
     
  8. Ramboz

    Ramboz

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Location:
    West Palm Beach Fl.
    I had the same problem and it was the slide lock spring on mine...it was an almost new gun (200 rnds fired)I replaced the slide lock and spring and have not had a problem since...Im left handed.. so it could not be my thumb or fingers hitting slide lock. It could not be your mag spring because there can be no round in the chamber for the mag to activate the slide lock Field strip your glock and lift up on slide lock lever...if it snaps down sharply your spring is ok...if it doesnt and kind of falls down its your spring...LET me know!!!
     
  9. GMT

    GMT GMT224

    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2002
    Location:
    Eastern nc
    I own a G-22 third gen. Only ftf was from operator error. The old limp wrist.;b