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Devil Dog
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731 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just installed a set of Truglo TFO's on my 36.After tightening the hex nut as tight as she would go,the front sight is very loose,i can wiggle it with my finger. Seems as though the nut is to short. I tried using the stock nut that came with the gun but it was way to long. Can i purchase a different nut size? Should I contact the seller and make him aware of the prob?
 

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NRA Life Member
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Is the sight slightly undersize for the oblong hole in the slide?
 

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Devil Dog
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Upon further inspection,I suppose that could be the culprit. The sight snaps in a little loosely,unlike the set that I installed on my 23 last week.with that front sight I had to tap it into the slide using a wooden dowel as a punch.
 

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IIRC on G 36's the threaded shaft on the nut may have to be shortened a bit for a proper tight fit. SJ 40
 

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I had the same problem when installing on my 19. I emailed TruGlo and they sent me their "new" longer sight screw free of charge right away. After I got it and put a tiny dab of blue loctite, she was all good to go. Was really impressed with their customer service to be honest.
 

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Florida's Left Coast
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9,516 Posts
You don't need a longer screw, you need a shorter one. You can Dremel a bit off, or pester TruGlo. It's about time they began enclosing the correct length screws as I have been Dremeling their screws for several years. Got tired of it and called TruGlo once and they sent me 2 shorter screws. I have installed dozens of their sights and they sent me 2!

BTW, TroGlo never made TFOs for the G36, so check to see if POA=POI for you.

Below is what I posted on GT somewhere about 3 years ago.:

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Yes, TFOs have had their share of complaints. One of the most oft-heard is the loosening of the front sight after a day of shooting - and it happened to me on my G24. After that, I believe I discovered the problem - or at least it's been several competitions and range trips with no new problems. So far, I have them on my 17, 34, and 24 and the front site is holding fine after several hundred rounds downange each (after I reworked the G24 sight). The front site DOES extend back over the slide-cut, but there seems to be no problem and nothing that will normally 'snag' the sights. The 17 and 34 are in and out of my holster many times a (shoot) day for steel and IDPA and so far show no ill effects from weekly practice and monthly matches for more than 2 months. There is about 1/10" space between the top of the barrel, and the bottom of the front sight at the cut.

Here is what I discovered, and what I did to (seemingly) make these sights secure:
The screw for the front sight appears to be too long - at least for ALL my guns. The sight oval 'key' that fits in the slide is approximately flat with the underside of the slide - but the screw is too long to bottom out and draw the sight against the slide. (You can check this before installing by tightening the screw in the sight and seeing if the underside of the screw COMPLETELY bottoms-out on the underneath of the sight. If it does not, you'll need to file or Dremel off about 1/32" - 3/64" until it does draw ALL the way down with NO SPACE between the screw and the sight bottom.

After that's done, you're ready to clean and degrease prior to the install:
I use denatured alcohol and a Q-tip, and completely and thoroughly clean and degrease the screw, the sight oval 'key', the sight screw (female) hole, the underside of the sight that contacts the top of the slide, the slide hole, and the top of the slide where the sight makes contact. (All of these component areas will have some Loctite on them.)

After ALL the above parts are degreased and have dried, you're ready for the actual installation:
Use the blue Loctite (242, Removable) recommended by TruGlo with a toothpick as an applicator. Loctite is NOT a filler - it is NOT Elmer's Glue.

Apply the Loctite sparingly with the toothpick - but covering all surfaces - to all the parts surfaces you previously degreased:
Sight screw threads and sight screw hole
Inside of slide 'hole'
Underside of sight that contacts top of slide
The screw threads and screw hole

NOW, you are ready to assemble:
Some of these installs have actually required a rubber mallet to get the sight into the slide

After that's done, insert and use the screw to tighten the sight to the slide.

NOW, here is where I depart from conventional wisdom... I use vise grips to hold the nutdriver (armorers tool) and screw it on TIGHT - tighter than I could possibly do with my fingers. These screws are hardened - but I'm sure very capable of snapping off in the steel sight, so BE CAREFUL and use common sense on the applied torque. The tool I use is excellent, and one of the best I've seen for the nutdriver part - and it also has an internal 3/32" punch, a slotted screwdriver, and a brush.
NOTE: I cannot currently find this on Brownell's site.
Since it's an LWD tool, it must be on their site as well.

NOW... after complete assembly, YOU MUST LET THE LOCTITE CURE FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS. Do not run to the range and try your new sights until the Loctite has fully cured.

A note on the rear sights:
These things are TIGHT - but I refuse to file (any) sights to install them. I prefer to use the correct tool to push them on. TruGlo has remarked on this forum about customers attempting to return sights that were beat to hell by the installer using a drift. These sights (I would imagine) are very difficult to drift on with a punch - though some on this forum have had some success with that method. This is the sight tool I use - all 3 parts totaling ~$200.
NOTE: I cannot find this tool either.
If you don't get all 3 parts, it doesn't work!!

So far, the TruGlos are holding. I'd like to think it is because of these extra steps I take to install them. The fiber optics are great outdoors and even indoors at the range and I can acquire a target faster than any other sight I've tried. I use them on my Glocks for IDPA, bowling pins, steel, and GSSF and they make a great SD/HD sight.
 

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You don't need a longer screw, you need a shorter one. You can Dremel a bit off, or pester TruGlo. It's about time they began enclosing the correct length screws as I have been Dremeling their screws for several years. Got tired of it and called TruGlo once and they sent me 2 shorter screws. I have installed dozens of their sights and they sent me 2!

BTW, TroGlo never made TFOs for the G36, so check to see if POA=POI for you.

Below is what I posted on GT somewhere about 3 years ago.:

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Yes, TFOs have had their share of complaints. One of the most oft-heard is the loosening of the front sight after a day of shooting - and it happened to me on my G24. After that, I believe I discovered the problem - or at least it's been several competitions and range trips with no new problems. So far, I have them on my 17, 34, and 24 and the front site is holding fine after several hundred rounds downange each (after I reworked the G24 sight). The front site DOES extend back over the slide-cut, but there seems to be no problem and nothing that will normally 'snag' the sights. The 17 and 34 are in and out of my holster many times a (shoot) day for steel and IDPA and so far show no ill effects from weekly practice and monthly matches for more than 2 months. There is about 1/10" space between the top of the barrel, and the bottom of the front sight at the cut.

Here is what I discovered, and what I did to (seemingly) make these sights secure:
The screw for the front sight appears to be too long - at least for ALL my guns. The sight oval 'key' that fits in the slide is approximately flat with the underside of the slide - but the screw is too long to bottom out and draw the sight against the slide. (You can check this before installing by tightening the screw in the sight and seeing if the underside of the screw COMPLETELY bottoms-out on the underneath of the sight. If it does not, you'll need to file or Dremel off about 1/32" - 3/64" until it does draw ALL the way down with NO SPACE between the screw and the sight bottom.

After that's done, you're ready to clean and degrease prior to the install:
I use denatured alcohol and a Q-tip, and completely and thoroughly clean and degrease the screw, the sight oval 'key', the sight screw (female) hole, the underside of the sight that contacts the top of the slide, the slide hole, and the top of the slide where the sight makes contact. (All of these component areas will have some Loctite on them.)

After ALL the above parts are degreased and have dried, you're ready for the actual installation:
Use the blue Loctite (242, Removable) recommended by TruGlo with a toothpick as an applicator. Loctite is NOT a filler - it is NOT Elmer's Glue.

Apply the Loctite sparingly with the toothpick - but covering all surfaces - to all the parts surfaces you previously degreased:
Sight screw threads and sight screw hole
Inside of slide 'hole'
Underside of sight that contacts top of slide
The screw threads and screw hole

NOW, you are ready to assemble:
Some of these installs have actually required a rubber mallet to get the sight into the slide

After that's done, insert and use the screw to tighten the sight to the slide.

NOW, here is where I depart from conventional wisdom... I use vise grips to hold the nutdriver (armorers tool) and screw it on TIGHT - tighter than I could possibly do with my fingers. These screws are hardened - but I'm sure very capable of snapping off in the steel sight, so BE CAREFUL and use common sense on the applied torque. The tool I use is excellent, and one of the best I've seen for the nutdriver part - and it also has an internal 3/32" punch, a slotted screwdriver, and a brush.
NOTE: I cannot currently find this on Brownell's site.
Since it's an LWD tool, it must be on their site as well.

NOW... after complete assembly, YOU MUST LET THE LOCTITE CURE FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS. Do not run to the range and try your new sights until the Loctite has fully cured.

A note on the rear sights:
These things are TIGHT - but I refuse to file (any) sights to install them. I prefer to use the correct tool to push them on. TruGlo has remarked on this forum about customers attempting to return sights that were beat to hell by the installer using a drift. These sights (I would imagine) are very difficult to drift on with a punch - though some on this forum have had some success with that method. This is the sight tool I use - all 3 parts totaling ~$200.
NOTE: I cannot find this tool either.
If you don't get all 3 parts, it doesn't work!!

So far, the TruGlos are holding. I'd like to think it is because of these extra steps I take to install them. The fiber optics are great outdoors and even indoors at the range and I can acquire a target faster than any other sight I've tried. I use them on my Glocks for IDPA, bowling pins, steel, and GSSF and they make a great SD/HD sight.
I tried to tell him that back a few posts ago but then what do we know. SJ 40
 

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You're right, my mistake it was indeed a shorter screw that I was sent. You could always try the dremel it's only a thread or 2 that you have to take off. I just sent the email to TruGlo and their response was they sent me one. I received it within 4 days of their response.
 
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