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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No, not hushpuppies!

I was about six when I had something I could only describe as a cornbread pancake. It was cornbread but fried.

Any ideas what this is? Or how to make it?

I have tried but failed. I distinctly remember starting to ask this here once before so if I did...well, tell me what you can again :supergrin:
 

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We used to call them hoe cakes because they originated when people actually used hoes to make them. They place the batter on a greased hoe and held it over the coals in a fireplace to bake/fry. And no, I cannot get them to hold together.
 

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Aren't those "JohnnyCakes"?

1 quick Google search finds this!

Johnny Cakes
From Diana Rattray,

Some think these fried cornmeal cakes were originally called Journey Cakes, while others belive they were first called Shawnee Cakes after the tribe in the Tennessee Valley.
INGREDIENTS:
1/2 cup flour
1 cup cornmeal
1 to 2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 cup hot milk
1 tablespoon shortening
PREPARATION:
Mix the dry ingredients, then stir in the remaining ingredients. Drop or pour on the hot, greased griddle or drop in iron skillet and fry to golden brown on both sides. Serve with butter and syrup as for pancakes, or serve as a bread with butter.
Serves 4 to 6.
 

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My mother would make her cornbread in a cast iron skillet on top of the stove. I could never duplicate her recipe and technique. I still have her pan, but I follow the label directions on the bag of yellow meal and bake it in the oven. Not mom's recipe, but it works. She never made Johnny Cakes, however. I'll have to give them a try.
 

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Originally posted by Miss Maggie
We used to call them hoe cakes because they originated when people actually used hoes to make them. They place the batter on a greased hoe and held it over the coals in a fireplace to bake/fry. And no, I cannot get them to hold together.
Lots of similar recipes as above J-Cakes...

http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,hoe_cake,FF.html
 

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to use about 1/4 inch of oil hot in the pan.

And to thin your batter, almost watery

When you pour it in and the edges get lacey.

It should be a thin cake -like a crepe.

You could thin your corn bread batter, or remove half of your flour from your pancake recipe and replace it with corn meal and maybe add 2 spoons of sugar and more liquid to thin it.

I make pancakes like this any way
1+ 1/2 cups flour
3/4 cup stone ground yellow cornmeal
2 tablespoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of sugar
sift together
add 2 tablespoons oil (or melted butter)
2 beaten eggs
enough butter milk to make it like really thick cream
 

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Originally posted by Miss Maggie
We used to call them hoe cakes because they originated when people actually used hoes to make them. They place the batter on a greased hoe and held it over the coals in a fireplace to bake/fry. And no, I cannot get them to hold together.
 

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Both of my Grandmas made it and my Dad made it for me growing up. Forgive me but we're not much on recipes. Make up some grits, but a little thinner. Pour them into a hot, greased skillet. My Grandma on my Mom's side made them a little different- she made them thick and poured them into a square dish to set up before frying them. Either way, they're good with Karo syrup.
 

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We call that fried mush, related to scrapple.

The fried cornbread is more related to a pancake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Originally posted by lethal tupperwa
to use about 1/4 inch of oil hot in the pan.

And to thin your batter, almost watery

When you pour it in and the edges get lacey.

It should be a thin cake -like a crepe.

You could thin your corn bread batter, or remove half of your flour from your pancake recipe and replace it with corn meal and maybe add 2 spoons of sugar and more liquid to thin it.

I make pancakes like this any way
1+ 1/2 cups flour
3/4 cup stone ground yellow cornmeal
2 tablespoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of sugar
sift together
add 2 tablespoons oil (or melted butter)
2 beaten eggs
enough butter milk to make it like really thick cream
You use cornmeal in your pancakes? How interesting!

I don't think I have ever had one that didn't come from a mix. Well, I used buckwheat once but I can't remember if it was just flour or a mix...
 

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It gives them a yellow color that people guess is Butter.

My recipe is sort of something I found in a book of Mountain Cooking.

Later I saw Martha Stewart do it but she uses a lot more sugar.

My brother ate mine and threw away his mix.
 

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I don't measure, but these are simple:

corn meal mixed with water until thick and pasty (barely pours)

pan fry in skillet medium high in just enough oil to cover the bottom of the pan, flip, until golden brown and crispy on the outside.

These end up being about 1/4 inch thick or less, look like small pancakes. The thinner, the more crispier, which I like. For thinner cornbread, add more water to the batter.


I prefer this style over fluffly cake-like cornbread.

Edited to add: Don't try to cut calories and use Pam spray, etc instead of oil. It doesn't give the same flavor or crispy texture.
 
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