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For you Motorcycle people, Boot question?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by DARKSHADOW, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. DARKSHADOW

    DARKSHADOW My Work Hobby CLM

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    I would appreciate some recomendation's for some ridding boots. As for what bike, I'm not sure yet. All my shoes are, well, shoes. And to take the riders course in florida, they are recomending that students wear boots that cover (and I would guess support) the ankle.
    As for what bike to start on, I,ve been eyeballing the Kawisaki 250R, and a Harley Sportster. Price has me leaning towards the 250R, but my 30" inseam has me leaning toward the Sportster. So im not sure what I want yet.

    Can you help a newbie out with some footwear?
     
  2. MedicOni

    MedicOni

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    The boots I used for riding were these:
    Converse Combat boots for days I needed to walk or when I was going to work
    A* SMXR boots for hard riding
    A* GPS3 boots for touring on superslab

    I'd go with teh 250R. I have a 30" inseam and started on the 500R and was fine.
     

  3. Sharkey

    Sharkey

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    I've been cycling for 10 years now and firmly believe in ATGATT. That said, I'm not sold on cycle specific boots. I think any of the tactical police boots are fine and should be approved for the MSF class. As long as your ankle is covered and protected, you should be good. Currently using Timberland Combat boots and they are uber comfortable with good protection. Sportsman's Guide had them for $59.

    30" inseam here too and a Ninja 500 is a good choice. Bulletproof motor, not fast off the line yet easy to do highway speeds, and pretty comfortable. I'm not a cruiser guy. You could get a bigger bike if you can control your throttle hand. Yammy FZ6, Zuki SV650, Kawi ER6, and an older Honda 599 come to mind. Buy used IMO.

    Good luck and have fun. I'll be riding till I get too old. Current rides:
    06 Zuki Burgman 650 and 03 Kawi ZZR600
     
  4. 2009Glocker

    2009Glocker Right Winger

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  5. Smashy

    Smashy

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    I answered this question recently on another forum, so here it is again: Tourmaster Solutions. No break-in period, they're ready to go out of the box. Roomy toe but not too large, so maneuvering the toe around the shifter is easy. Extremely comfortable, I use them for walking around all the time when I ride different places and my feet never feel tired or sore. I've had them on all day many a time and they're still comfortable.

    They're not too hot in the summer and keep my feet warm in the cold, and I can say from experience that they're genuinely waterproof. I've never treated them with anything since new (sort of an ongoing test) and they've never developed any wet spots in the rain. The only thing I think could use improvement is that the top of the boot doesn't close tightly around the leg if you secure the top flap in it's normal position (this might not be an issue for folks with meatier legs than mine). I deal with that by simply pulling the flap back and down a bit when I secure it. Works for me. For the price, I couldn't be happier. I got them from newenough.com for about $115. When these wear out, I plan to replace them with the same boot. I've been wearing them for over a year now (and I ride in the winter) and they show no signs of wearing out, very solid construction.

    http://www.tourmaster.com/xcart/product.php?productid=82&cat=7

    http://newenough.com/street/boots/w...master/solution_wp_road_motorcycle_boots.html

    One thing not mentioned in the description is there's a piece of armor in the shin above the flex panel. The stitching isn't as bright as it appears in the pictures; that's mainly due to the camera flash.

    [​IMG]

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  6. meanmotorscooter

    meanmotorscooter

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    I use the same tourmasters as Smashy. I highly recommend them. They're comfortable, completely waterproof and provide good protection.
     
  7. Eric

    Eric Big Giant Head Staff Member Admin Silver Member

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    I wear Setup motorcycle boots. I don't believe this brand is still in production, but the boots above are very similar. Good riding boots will be tough, with reinforced leather on the inside-top of the boots, behind the big toes. This is where the left boot will rub on upshifts and where both boots will rub on the shifter and rear brake levers, when the toes of your boots are tucked up under the pedals (My boots are reinforced over both toes).

    The boots have steel reinforcement in the arch area of the boot, where the foot rides on the pegs. There are protective disks sewn in on either side of each boot, over the ankle joint. The soles get good traction and they are oil and heat resistant. The area of the boot that covers the heel is reinforced and there is a reflector on the back of each boot. The boots are insulated and waterproof, but also breath well, to keep your feet warm and dry.

    A good pair of riding boots will not be cheap, but they will give you safer and more comfortable performance on a bike. That is what they are built for.

    The 250 sounds like a good starter bike. I don't think the Sportster does though. It is a far heavier bike. I find them too heavy, too top-heavy, poorly balanced and not the most pleasant riding experience. It is also not going to be nearly as easy a bike to ride or learn on. I don't mean to crap in the Harley guys' Wheaties, or start a rice-burner vs hawg debate. These are just my thoughts on this. Your mileage may vary. My advice is to start on a 250 Dual-Sport bike. They are small, light, typically well balanced and easy to ride. You will be having to deal with enough learning to ride. A small 250 makes good sense. You are going to have to do things like left-handed and right-handed U-Turns and figure-eights inside a 20' or so foot box, in your riding course. You don't want to have to do this on a heavy, poorly balanced bike.

    Whatever you choose, the rider-safety course is a good idea. They will almost certainly provide the bikes for everyone to ride and you probably would not be given the choice of riding your own bike, even if you brought one. These courses typically use bikes like Yamaha Trailways 200's and Shadow & Virago 250's. These are good starter bikes.

    In AZ, the failure rate for people taking their bike endorsement test for the first time is more than 50%. When you take the state-sanctioned motorcycle-safety course, the final test for the course IS your endorsement test for the license. If you pass the course, you pass the test. Unless a person is a complete spaz or dumbass, you'll pass the course. They will work with the people having difficulties, until they get it right. You'll get a break on your bike insurance with the course completion, as well. Good luck with it and welcome to the clan. Eric
     
  8. HollowHead

    HollowHead Firm member

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    One of the great joys of riding a motorcycle is being able to ride to remote places and then getting off and walking for hours. If you can't walk for hours in the boots you ride in, you've picked the wrong boots. HH
     
  9. Eric

    Eric Big Giant Head Staff Member Admin Silver Member

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    I think that the primary consideration for riding footwear is riding safety and comfort, not walking comfort. A really comfortable pair of walking foot gear isn't necessarily going to give you adequate protection in a crash.

    There are good riding boots that are comfortable to walk in. My Setup bike boots were very comfortable to walk in, right out of the box. I've put a lot of miles in them, both on the bike and on the ground and they've been great.

    A person should start with a good, quality brand of boot, but proper sizing is more often the cause of discomfort than the boot itself. It is extremely important to get boots that fit properly. Every boot brand's sizes can be a little different, so just knowing the size and shape of your feet isn't enough to insure a good fit. You should go somewhere that you can try on the boots, before you buy. Eric
     
  10. Glock-it-to-me

    Glock-it-to-me Catching liars

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    Go ask Alice, I think she'll know
    Corcoran's

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    When it gets hot - Hitech

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  11. Janno05

    Janno05

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    I have a pair of Icon Superduty 2 boots that I really enjoy. They are definitely not track worthy, but for driving around town walking into stores and such they are great. They don't look out of place at all and will save your ankles if you go down.
     
  12. HollowHead

    HollowHead Firm member

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    Absolute end of thread. A better combo will never be posted! HH
     
  13. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

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    First and foremost get a pair that fastens, with a zipper or buckle etc, snuggly to your ankle and lower leg. In a crash slip on boots can easily fling off leaving your feet unprotected.

    I like Bates for street boots:

    http://www.batesleathers.com/boots/

    Alpinestars have great offering for street, dual sport and offroad:

    http://alpinestarsinc.com/moto
     
  14. Eric

    Eric Big Giant Head Staff Member Admin Silver Member

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    Really? To each his own, I guess. I had Cochran Jump Boots in the Army. I was in a light infantry unit and most of us had Cochrans, which we wore when we were in garrison. They held a better shine and they looked good. I don't know of anyone who wore them in the field though. They had no insulation, they weren't waterproof and they weren't a particularly comfortable boot to walk in. They helped keep the ankle stable, which helped prevent ankle injuries in parachute jumps, so I imagine Airborne units wore them more than a regular leg infantry unit, but they weren't a popular field boot in my unit.

    I tried riding my motorcycle with them a few times and found they weren't a great riding boot either. I found them too stiff. I thought it was a bit fatiguing to articulate the ankles the way you have to while riding, when wearing them. Usually when I rode in the Army, I wore my regular combat boots or a pair of jungle boots, with the nylon uppers.

    I'm not familiar with the other boot mentioned, but the cross-section of the toe looks pretty thick. I have a pair of hiking boots built like that and I have a hard time wedging the thick toes of the boots between the pegs and pedals, while cruising.

    Anyway, just my two cents. Hell, I've ridden in running shoes and even in flip-flops a few times, when I was younger and stupider.:supergrin: The pavement under my bike used to be an abstract to me. At my age now though, it is a cold, hard reality. I think more about safety now and I like the idea of a pair of boots designed specifically to protect my feet and ankles in a bike crash, as well as being built for ride safety and comfort. Notice that good bike boots don't have laces and the zippers are covered. This keeps anything on the boot from hanging up on the bike. It is a crappy feeling to try to put a foot down when you stop, only to have a lace hang up on something, preventing your foot from reaching the ground. That is a pretty embarrassing reason to drop a bike and possibly injure yourself. Good bike boots have thermal protection in the right places, crash protection in the right places, the heels are designed to engage the pegs just right and the toes are thin enough to slide easily under the foot levers. Eric
     
  15. davew83

    davew83 hhhhhhhhmmmmmmm

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    I agree with that, I have a pair for street duty when I still rode on the street and they provided much better ankle support than a pair of combat/work boots. They are not waterproof though. For track use or if you want a pair of boots that will provide a little more protection Alpinestar SMX+ boots are a good middle of the road price wise. If you want to spend some more you can go with the Alpinestar Supertech boots also. I have crash tested the Alpinestars SMX+ 3times now with out sustaining an injuries. Although I did break my ankle almost 2 years ago, it wasn't in a crash and it was more of a freakish accident type thing.
     
  16. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    For running around, I prefer this SIDI short boot. It goes well above the ankle for protection, it even has the cups to protect the ankle bones. For more aggressive riding, I have race boots that I'd use.

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  17. SVTNate

    SVTNate Packers fan

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    I have Icon Super Duty... I think III's, and Sidi Blades. The Icon boots are good basic boots and comfortable to walk around in. The Sidi boots are also comfortable, but a better fit due to being more adjustable, have vents, and replaceable armor as well.
     
  18. chris in va

    chris in va

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    I think the MSF's main purpose is to scare the bejeesus out of you so bad you WANT to wear as much armor as practically possible.

    Boots. I really like my Wolverine all-leather boots with the padded collar. One very nice feature is the grippy tread. Believe me, there's nothing more embarassing as putting your foot down at a light only to feel it skating around like Apolo Ohno in the olympics. In other words, don't wear boots with a hard rubber tread. Make sure your ankles are covered with ballistic nylon (aforementioned police boots) or leather.

    Watch out for the excessively tall toe box types. The flatter the boot, the easier it is to shift. All those Herman Munster looking things you see in the bike shops just aren't easy to work with.

    Skip the Sportster for now. It's top heavy, the last thing you want for a beginner bike. Mine was a Suzuki GS500e, served me well. Something in the 250-500 range would be perfect.

    Signed up for the MSF course yet?:whistling:
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2010
  19. davew83

    davew83 hhhhhhhhmmmmmmm

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    No offense but I would hardly consider those race boots, sport touring yes, race no.
     
  20. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    When did I say that those boots in the photographs are race boots?