Florida Pilots 'Counseled' for Rescues

Discussion in 'Veteran's Forum' started by RussP, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. RussP

    RussP Super Moderator Moderator

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    I don't know what to say...
     
  2. CarlosDJackal

    CarlosDJackal

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    This is typical CYA action from "the powers-that-be". As our TAC Officers in OCS used to say a lot: "Good initiative; bad judgement."

    I hope they go easy on these guys and give them an award for their heroism and devotion to duty. ;?
     

  3. RussP

    RussP Super Moderator Moderator

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    Amen...We did a lot of great things on ocassions...problem was we had to bend a few flight rules like minimum altitudes...:cool: :cool: :cool:
     
  4. GlocknAK

    GlocknAK

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    You bent so your customers didn't get broken... Thanks for doing the right thing Russ.
     
  5. Mterada

    Mterada

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    Does negative counseling in an oer work the same way it does in a ncoer?

    as in, anything bad = no promotions?
     
  6. CarlosDJackal

    CarlosDJackal

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    I used to get chewed out on a regular basis for things my guys did. Of course I wasn't exactly guilt-free. I still haven't figured out how I can regularly go 40 minutes on a 20-minute warning light. ;f
     
  7. RussP

    RussP Super Moderator Moderator

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    Unscrew it...oh, sorry, didn't mean to tell on you.

    Damn altitude buzzers....

    The G-meters screwed us too. I mean really, a couple extra Gs or plow into the ground. Is that a hard decision...well, you see my altitude problem and how we got caught.

    ;f ;f :cool:
     
  8. td.trmntr

    td.trmntr

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    It's always easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for
    permission. Food for thought.
     
  9. DMF

    DMF P33

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    Everyone is all for saving lives. However, there is the "big picture" to think about. If every flight crew does whatever the hell they want, no one will accomplish anything, and more people will die.

    There is a great example of this in a work of fiction called "12 O'clock High." There is a scene where the General chews out a crew for dropping out of formation to stay with a crippled plane, and explains while they were helping that one crew, they made the whole formation of planes more vulnerable. Same concept applies to this situation.

    So a little verbal counseling about maintaining discipline was appropriate.
     
  10. SeriousStudent

    SeriousStudent

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    Hmmm......

    Speaking as someone who was involved in a situation that could have gone to a summary court-martial, or to a awards ceremony, I feel their pain.

    The discussion of the "big picture" is really true. They had a LOT of birds in the air at that time. How many of them were down for maintenance, and needed parts flown in? Was their bird slated to fly that resupply run?

    Ya know, it was really easy to cuss Motor T and every one else as rear-echelon, but without the logistics and support people, it's a bad scene. The grunts don't eat, don't drink, and can't make loud noises.

    In this case, if nobody flies resupply, then eventually NO rescue birds fly. Fact.

    It is very, very satisfying to rescue people. Major good times. I used to do it. But if my trusty steed was not properly maintained, it was a tad difficult for me to charge off like Sir Lancelot. Somebody has to fix the chariot.

    And yes, I have begged for forgiveness more times than I have pleaded for permission. And I had the page 11 entries in my SRB to prove it. (That's the page for both awards and punishments. Usually light on the former, and heavy on the latter for most Marines.)

    Just my 2 cents. Shoot, I probably would have done the same thing, and been spanked for it as well. ;)

    And no, I lucked out, no summary court. The colonel said it was less paperwork for the award, than for the court. So that what I got.

    See? Even a blind pig finds a few acorns.
     
  11. Weston

    Weston

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    pull up a chair fellas while i dust off me’long, gray na-r-vy beard. reminds me of when I was boot ensign seabee far, far away in a distant shore, arggggggggg.

    this may come as a shocker but them'thar pencil necks in dc sometimes get it wrong. i know, its hard to believe, and keep in mind i have no knowledge of the story i share and disavow having ever even served in the military. in fact its my dog typing. arg arg argggg.

    well, the story goes there was this marine colonel that kept his mechanized units in proper working order for all his fine young marines for whom he cared dearly, by warehousing certain replacement parts that didn’t exist in a tunnel that didn’t exist and for certain equipment that was functioning properly and didn’t need replacement parts. funny how all that works.

    anyway the design and location of that particular newly constructed tunnel that didn’t exist ultimately became the subject of a certain inspector general who i am pretty certain did exist. wait a minute, me dog wants to think about it for a second…yup, me dog says the ig was real. and as the story goes anyone connected with that particular non-event was to one degree or another burnt toast.

    The colonel was charred, which i never understood and found to be an enormous injustice given the circumstances. high grade fubar…i’m here to tell ya fellas, this is a story Disney would never produce!

    now from time to time i…i mean me’dog shares this here story on topic with the price of leadership and honor that goes with serving with marines, along with that particular colonel of course. but one day it was with a man – an ig man -- who politely allowed me’dog to finish but then carefully, methodically explained in intricate detail a story of a “bigger picture” and the importance of paper. of poor fellas struggling for survival in a terrible place called dc…of a nightmarish labor from 8:00 to 5:00 with two coffee breaks and a lunch in between…of traffic jams and lines to the movies even!!!

    well, i’m here to tell yee na-r-vy fly boys, that was some nice work. keep it under the radar next time. argggggg.