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Flash Drives as a Archive/BackUp Media?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Wulfenite, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Seems Like CDs and DVDs will go funky if you look at them cross ways. With Flash drives getting so cheep, I was just wondering if they're suitable as a archive device. IF you take one, load it with data, and put it in a safe or a file in a filing cabinet, how long will the data on it keep assuming no abuse?
     
  2. chbix

    chbix

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    I dont think that the flash drive would be the most reliable. They are known for randomly crashing data.

    Think about you statement about cheaper in pricing, means cheaper in componenets and quality, means more of a chance that the data is going to not be there when you need it.

    If you considering flash drives, it probably means your looking at 1 2 or 4 gigs of data, why not find a old 20gb harddrive and either install that has a backup, or even buy an external case enclosure to make it an external HDD backup.

    Just ideas but I wouldnt put any data that I really needed on a flash drive with out other backups.

    As for the dvd/cd quality comment, you can pay more and buy better quality media for backups.

    I have a lot of things that I dont want to lose, pictures, documents, I have them on a DVD in a dry safe place and I dont fret that one day they wont be there.
     

  3. Blitzer

    Blitzer Cool Cat

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    The 2 GB thumb drive are $25.00 to $30.00 each. It appears DVDs and CDs are a lot cheaper and "more" reliable.:thumbsup:
     
  4. bobelk99

    bobelk99

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    DVD format is more reliable (i.e. less prone to loss)
    Avoid bargain brands. TDK, Maxell for example are solid. Avoid house brands.
    There is no bargain in not having the restore when you want it.
    Just remember that three backup versions are a comfortable minimum.
    I have had a little experience in backup and security, and can't speak lowly enough about bargain media.
     
  5. lens

    lens

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    Flash drives are designed for temporary storage . . . to move data between 2 or more placed . . . NOT for archival storage!

    CD/DVD is still the best archival media at this point in time (good media should last at least 10-15 years).

    I create 2 or 3 copies of important data. Store the CD/DVD in different locations for safety purposes.

    I'm also using external HDDs to Move data from primary machines with the intent of archiving off the ext. HDD to CD/DVD for true archiving.

    YMMV
     
  6. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Well I guess that answers it. CD and DVD's just seem so fragle. The commercial ones with the protective coating arent bad, but the ones dune in a burner are just one careless momemnt from the garbage can. And that's after you've successfully writen them and there are a dozen different ways of screwing that up. Seems like we really need a good permenant way to store data. Serriously, what do your store your pictures on if 40 years from now you want to show your grandkids pictures of their parents.....and you'd like to have access to them in the meantime?
     
  7. Rabid Rabbit

    Rabid Rabbit

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    We completly revised our backup system, we got rid of the tapes and DVD backups. I have a netgear SANS with 160GB RAID 1 and a 250GB external USB as a backup to the SANS and hold the ghost images. Watching the sales I managed to put this together for a little less than $300.
     
  8. Darkmage

    Darkmage

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    A cousin of mine works for the archeological department at a Museum in Arizona. This is a serious problem for his department, as their data needs to last 80+ years as the relics they uncover & document are so fragile, they easily disintegrate soon after extraction from dig sites.

    At the moment, it looks like a rolling backup medium is the way to go. Store your data in multiple locations and transfer data as needed to fresh media. Have multiple hard drives with the data. When one fails, replace the hard drive and restore from backup. Keep data on two drives as much as possible. Eventually, the 2nd drive will fail. Replace and restore from drive #1. Keep up this juggling act for 40 years.

    There is a product that is a simple RAID-like device that has a pretty good solution. They're used for media centers and HTPCs. It's a multi-drive storage array, but unlike RAID, each drive can be of different sizes. One drive is the parity drive and must be at least the same size as the largest drive. Every other drive in the system can be whatever size you want. Each drive is mounted as a seperate drive letter, and the OS is Linux-based and comes on USB stick.

    If you lose a drive, you pop in a new one and re-create it via the parity drive. If you lose the parity drive, you pop in a new one and re-create the parity drive. If you lose two drives at once, you've only lost two drives' worth of data. It seems like a pretty slick setup. You just need to have a multi-HD case and a good power supply.

    If anyone is interested, I can dig up more information, including websites and costs.