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fishing line confusion.

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by jolt8me, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. jolt8me

    jolt8me Your the devil

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    I just started fishing over the winter and dont know much about fishing line. Can anyone recommend a line for me? I am fishing on the grand river in michigan. Usually fish for trout and steelhead some walleye. As i said its in the river with visiability at about 15". the river usually is brown some days its clearer than others. I run mostly spoons and crankbaits.

    forgot to add that i'm useing a 7' shimano rod and reel.
     
  2. geminicricket

    geminicricket NRA Life member

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    4 to 6 lb test line works pretty well for fish up to 2x the line rating. The thinner the line, the less visible it is to the fish. That's desirable. Back when I was fishing, 25 years ago, Trilene was the best line you could get. It may still be. Check your state's Fish and Game Department web site and see if they have any recommendations.
     

  3. noway

    noway

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    What are you using as far as reel ? spining/baitcast/spin-cast/etc?for a typical line 4-6lb would be good so would 4-10lbs if you need alot of abrasion resistance also.

    Not only does a lighter lB line = thinner it also transmit more of the fish bite back to your so you know a fish is on the line and haven't ran off with your bait.

    one of the biggest thing I see down here ( FLA ) with salt-water fisherman fishing fresh, is they bring these big long rods and reels with 25lbs test line on them. I always shake my head when seeing this. They aren't trying to catch a 12lb snapper of 20lb grouper but are trying to catch a 5lb bass ;)

    So for your setup, you need to ask yourself the following questions;

    > is the water clear or stained
    > do I need abrasion resistance( will you fish gravel bottoms, alot of trash in the water, docks,vertical stumps etc...... )
    > can I sacrifice a little sensitvity with a thicker line
    > can you set a hook into the fish mouth with a thinner stretchy line, which is what a thinner ine would do.


    For my typical setup I use 4lb test on panfish and/or 2lbs if the conditions are right. For trout,brass,catfishing I use 6-10lb, with myself using more towards the 6lb end than the 10lb end.The above all , is for a spining reel setup.


    fwiw: I've caught more fish on lighter tackle and thinner linies than thicker lines.

    Hope this helps ;)
     
  4. NYGunman

    NYGunman o.oO0Oo.oO0Oo.o

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    I do a lot of Salmon fishing in the rivers. It is a bit different than steelhead fishing but is close. You'll need a lighter setup.

    For a mainline I use 15 or 17 pound Trilene XT (extra tough) monofilament line. I like this line because it is more resistant to abrasions from rocks and trees. At the end of that line I attach the smallest swivel WalMart has. From there I tie on a small piece (1 1/2' to 4') of Berkley Vanish fluorocarbon for a leader. I attach the fly directly to the leader using a Berkley knot.

    On the swivel you should tie a small piece of fishing line that hangs down about 6 inches. Attach the sinkers to this line. If the rocks grab the sinker, it will slide right off instead of snagging your whole line. It will save you a lot of flies and retying.

    I talk to a lot of steel head anglers and they use anywhere from 4 to 12 pound mainline. They also like fluorocarbon. I also know that they use longer rods than what you are using. For more information try this site. http://steelheadsite.com/

    Here are a couple of pics of chinook salmon I caught. They are smaller than the west coast chinooks because they don't go out to sea.

    <img src="http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h10/NYGunman/NewImage.jpg">

    <img src="http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h10/NYGunman/salmon.jpg">
     
  5. Brass Nazi

    Brass Nazi NO BRASS FOR U!

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  6. A_Swede_17_1911

    A_Swede_17_1911

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    I would suggest two diffent line to be honest. For when the water is low and clear I would run a 6-8lb line on a spinning real, 10lb might be pushing it. If the water is running heavy and with alot of color, look at maybe running a 14-17 line if you can for steelhead. Now if you just want to use one line look at a 10-12 for a good comprise. I would use a good quality monofilament. I like Ande, it is quality stuff, but doesnt have the abrasian resistance, but i respool quite a bit. I also like the maxima lines, but they can be expeive. Ive started to use Berkley Transtion, on some of my stuff andi like it. P-line would be another good choice.

    How cold is the water your fishing? If its colder I would look for a limper line, to help from being to stiff. Thats one reason I like Ande is that it has a medium body to it. Also I have had good results with the knot strength as well.


    I think you might be best served with the 10-12 line with spoons and crankbaits, since you dont want to inhibit the action to much like you would with heavier lines.

    Might want to expriment to see what works the best for you as well. Lines are not the cheapest thing but are easy to replace, and have a spools for line changes to see what fishes the best for how you fish.