First experience with .40 = unpleasant

Discussion in 'Caliber Corner' started by jeep olllllo, Feb 3, 2010.

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  1. jeep olllllo

    jeep olllllo

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    Hey gang. I have an HK USP .40 compact. I shot it for the first time -also it was my first time shooting .40 in general- and the recoil was extremely unpleasant. I was shooting Winchester white box hollow point 180gr ammo. I am wondering is it possible that the rounds themselves were harsher than normal? It wasnt +p or +p+ ammo. Can you tell me if I were to shoot a lighter round would it recoil a bit less?

    I have plenty of time on the 9MM and .45 platform...but I dont know jack about .40. As it stands right now I want to trade the gun for a diff caliber. At 30 bucks a box for ammo I dont have the funds to experiment too much.

    Any and all input is welcome and appreciated.

    thanks,
     
  2. Mwinter

    Mwinter I'm MilkMan Dan

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    Never used that particular load, but some .40SW is definitely snappier than most 9/45 fodder.

    Funny thing is, it is *usually* the lighter rounds in .40SW that seem to feel hot....155s, 165s, etc. Most 180s 'feel' soft to me.

    I issue the Federal 165gr Bonded Tactical at work and it's a very soft shooter (unusual for a 165). I'll also recommend the Ultramax 165gr FMJ....we use it as a practice round. A bit cheaper than a lot of Speer/Rem/Fed/Win stuff, soft shooting, and there hasn't been a single problem in about 6k rds so far.

    If you'll look on manufacturer's websites, they'll have specs posted. Find a 180gr pill at below 1000fps (900-950 is fine) and you should have something a little tamer than some of the other offerings.
     

  3. 82ndVet

    82ndVet

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    Is that the only reason for you wanting to get rid of it already...? If you don't like it, by all means, sell it. But I want you to come to terms with reality for a moment, and understand that pistol can be controlled just like any other can...with a little practice. Recoil should be the last factor (if any) you consider on any firearm you experience.

    :patriot:
     
  4. Eagle22

    Eagle22

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    Go to wally world and by some Federal Premium 180gr.

    Shoot a 100 or so rounds with that.
     
  5. Clem Eastwood

    Clem Eastwood

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    the USPc is my favorite platform, but i have 9mm's. in the .40 the muzzle flip is more pronounced to me. if you dont like the WWB 180gr than i wouldnt suggest the remington green box 180gr FMJs. they are hot and have a bunch of muzzle flash to boot.

    the .40 USPc feels a little more snappy to me than the 9mm and .45, but I didnt think it was horrible. the extra muzzle flip of the combination of short barrel and .40 slowed my time to reacquire the target, but other than that i didnt think the recoil was too bad.
     
  6. LEAD

    LEAD

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    WWB really isn't that bad in terms of recoil, I actually find lighter loads to be more unpleasent so I stick to the middle ground of 165gr mostly. I don't find corbon DPX 140gr Objectionable either. You won't likely find many, more downplayed versions of the 40 than WWB 180gr

    Grip can help the most, how much experience do you have, before we go remedial on you?

    I reccomend the "champion" stance or the "weaver" for shooting autos. The champion involves locking out your dominant arm and bending your other armwhile pulling back on the dominant arm. The weaver is both arms straight out.

    I reccomend the chapman or isosceles for shooting autos The chapman involves locking out your dominant arm and bending your other armwhile pulling back on the dominant hand. It is a derivative of the weaver but the I think it seems to help control muzzle flip and felt recoil. The isosceles is both arms straight out; Some people lock out thier elbows, others bend them, find what works for you.

    [​IMG]
    Weaver
    Should be Isosceles

    [​IMG]


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQgLmQl1zDw
    On grip


    Hope it helps, but let us know where your at skill-wise
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2010
  7. Free Radical

    Free Radical Miembro Antiguo CLM

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    40.S&W is a high pressure round. Being a modern pistol caliber, there is no (legitimate) +p or +p+ ammo for .40 S&W. WWB is pretty tame stuff. 180gr. is probably the lightest recoil that you will experience. The lighter stuff is going to bark harder.
    You will get used to it. Really, you will.
     
  8. jeep olllllo

    jeep olllllo

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    Thanks for the replys fellas. I guess I just dont really feel like "working" on adjusting to a gun. Maybe I have just been lucky, but I hve owned 15 different guns in 9mm and.45 over the years and they have all been "fun" to shoot....right away, no work was required on my part to adapt to the gun. I have a great offer to trade my compact .40 for a full size .45. Since the size difference between the two guns is very minimal I may take the plunge.
     
  9. DRT

    DRT

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    The .40 S&W has the same SAAMI pressure spec's as the standard 9mm. Is the 9mm a "high pressure round" too?
     
  10. 82ndVet

    82ndVet

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    HK for HK?? I'd definitely take that plunge. HK .45 is a nice piece of machinery. On a different note, if you decide to try the 40 out for awhile before you trade it, feed it a box or three of Corbon Match 165g FMJs. I think you'll like it.

    :wavey:
     
  11. G26S239

    G26S239 NRA Patron

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    If you practice more you may get used to it. USPs tend to shoot softer after the first few hundred rounds. I find the recoil of the USPc 40 easy to deal with but I have been shooting 40 for 13 years.
     
  12. the iceman

    the iceman Proud Veteran CLM

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    Recoil is very manly!
     
  13. H&K 4 LIFE

    H&K 4 LIFE Leonum A Ignis

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    Plain and simple, you need more trigger time with the caliber. The felt recoil of the .40 is "snappier" then the 9mm, but not unlike some of the 9's hotter self defense loads. The recoil impulse is also much different then that of the .45. The .40 has a "snap", compared to the slow but stiff "shove" of the .45.

    Having shot all manner of different grain weights, I have found the heavier 180gr. loads to have the least felt recoil. I do not find the WWB .40S&W JHP to have any more felt recoil then your typical FMJ load.

    The USPc .40 is personally my favorite HK. :)
     
  14. Davegrave

    Davegrave Dapper Dan

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    I just don't enjoy shooting .40
    I'm not sure why. I don't mind powerful loads like .357 and .44 mag. I love my .45 and 9mm
    But .40....you can keep it. I'm glad I traded my G23.
     
  15. fastbolt

    fastbolt

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    What you're describing isn't uncommon when someone first experiences shooting a pistol chambered in .40 S&W. It simply develops more felt recoil than most pistols chambered in the lighter recoiling 9mm and .45 ACP calibers.

    Ironically, the HK USP usually is described as having close to the least amount of felt recoil when chambered in the .40 S&W cartridge.

    Even worse, and as has already been mentioned, the 180gr loads are usually found to be lightest recoiling loads commonly offered in this caliber. There have been at least a couple 165gr loads developed for LE which produced less recoil, but usually the lighter bullets end up being pushed to faster velocities and offering more felt recoil to the shooter.

    Felt recoil is still subject to personal perspective and can vary from one shooter to the next.

    You'll find some folks online who swear they can't tell any difference at all when shooting a particular model pistol chambered in both 9mm and .40 S&W, but it's more common to have ordinary shooters express (or admit ;) ) the opinion that the average .40 S&W pistol exhibits more felt recoil to them than a similar 9mm (or even a .45).

    I've carried a couple of different issued .40's over the course of my career, and I own 5 different .40's of my own. I own a handful of 9mm's and 9 pistols chambered in .45 ACP, and I've carried issued pistols chambered in both calibers, too, at one time or another. I've fired many, many thousands of rounds of .40 S&W, and many tens of thousands of rounds of 9mm & .45 ACP.

    I'm one of the folks who feels the .40 S&W guns deliver more felt recoil, and/or more muzzle snap & whip, making for a bit more difficulty when it comes to recoil management and controllability.

    I'm not saying I can't shoot them well, because I've been told now and again that I can. I grew up learning to shoot heavily hand-loaded .357, .41 & .44 Magnum revolvers and learning to enjoy recoil, too.

    I'm just saying I think the .40's make me work harder when it comes to recoil management and controllability.

    The upside is that they also seem to continually make me just a little bit better when I go back to one of my many 9/.45 guns. ;)

    I guess that's sort of win/win ... :whistling:

    Luck to you. :)
     
  16. remat

    remat

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    Big +1. I don't know why I keep seeing posted on internet forums that 9mm is not. In fact the 9mm +P (and who knows with +P+) can exceed the PSI on 40 loads.
     
  17. 05FLHT

    05FLHT

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    Same here. Had a XD40SC. Still have, and love to shoot my G19 and SP101. Although I suspect a lot has to do with the weight of the gun, even full load .357 in the Ruger felt better than the .40.
     
  18. jeep olllllo

    jeep olllllo

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    If I were in law enforcement and had to get used to the .40 I am sure I could. That said though shooting is a hobby of mine....its supposed to be fun, not work....hell if I wanted to punish myself I would play more golf. I have several nice offers of an in-state trade (no costs at all) for a full size nice condition USP 45 in stainless, a brand new USPc9mm, or a nice p2000 9MM with the LEM trigger. Now I just have to figure out what I want to trade for........

    Thanks again for the advice.
     
  19. Clem Eastwood

    Clem Eastwood

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    the compacts dont have the dual recoil spring "recoil reduction system" that the fullsize USPs have. the compacts just have a nylon bushing to buffer the recoil. so load for load the compacts are a little more harsh on recoil than the USPf's.
     
  20. Merkavaboy

    Merkavaboy Code-7A KUZ769

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    Win USA 180FMJ is about as tame of a target/plinking load that you can get. There's a reason why I hardly ever shoot my G23 .40. My G19s and G26 recoil less when shooting 115+P+ loads than my G23 using standard target loads. In the real world the .40 does nothing that the 9mm can't achieve with less recoil.

    If you like the HK pistol but don't like the .40, look into getting a 9mm barrel and swap it out. There's absolutely no need to suffer with unpleasant recoil.

    Don't let others goad you into thinking that by shooting more rounds down range will make you feel any different in a few months time. If you don't like it, you don't like it. End of story.