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First Bike, Triumph or Harley

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by ddj8052, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. ddj8052

    ddj8052

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    Hey guys,

    I am going to be purchasing my first bike in the next year and need help making this decsion. I have one freind who is telling me to buy the Triumph Speedmaster as a first bike because it is fairly inexpensive and would allow me to get a feel for what riding is all about. He feeels that this make more sense than running out and buying my "dream bike right away.

    Everyone else is telling me to buy what I really want the first time as I will be happier in the long run and not waste money on a bike that I will sell off at a loss later on down the road.

    The bike I really want is a Harley Davidson Softtail Nighttrain. So what do you guys think?

    Harley or Triumph?

    Thanks for any suggestions.
     
  2. codivecop

    codivecop

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    I bought my "dream bike" for my first.

    I had limited experiance back when I was a kid.

    I suggest a rider course MSSF or ABATE and get what YOU want. If YOU want a 'learner' bike, get it.


    If you want your dream bike, get it!


    Get trained though!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

  3. Wrangler100

    Wrangler100 NRA Patron Mbr

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    First bike? Buy a cheap used bike and learn to ride that. Then buy your Harley.

    I have a HArley, both my brothers and their son's have Yamaha Road Stars, very nice bikes and I like the ergonomics, power, and handling better, but the Harley is...


    ... A Harley!:thumbsup:
     
  4. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    The people that tell you that are idiots. There are plenty of used bikes around that you can use as your first bike and still won't lose much if any when you're ready to go for your dream bike.

    As far as Harleys or Triumphs, that's up to you. I don't care much for cruisers because that's not how I ride, however upon saying that, Triumph cruisers are really crappy. I rode the Triumph America and while I don't care much for cruisers, I've always managed to find some charms about them. Not in the case of the Triumph. The handling was sloppy, the engine was anemic as was the braking potential.

    But if you were to want to get your dream bike as your first bike then by all means. It's your money after all, but don't cry too much when you drop it and scratch the hot paint job or break something costly.

    You can spend two grands on a cheap used bike for half a year or a year and sell it off for about the same or a bit less. Or you can take a chance with your brand stanking new $20,000 dream machine. Just remember that the people who tells you to get your dream bike won't be the ones that are paying for your bike, riding your bike or dropping/crashing your bike.;)

    And I assume that you're a first time rider as well? Even when you take the riding course (MSF or HD's Rider's Edge - they're both the same), the instructors will tell you that you now know enough to be dangerous. Do you want to try to perfect your riding skills on an 800-lbs vehicle?

    Anyway, that's my two cents.
     
  5. epsylum

    epsylum Boolit Hoze

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    Buy an old used dirt bike and practice the fundementals on that. No need to plate or insure it, it has all the same controls as a street bike, should be pretty cheap, and teaches you about balance and traction. Also there are no speed limits or other motorists that will run you over off-road.

    After you feel comfortable on that, sell it and get your dream bike. Who knows, it might be a dirt bike by then. ;)
     
  6. coldmcrider

    coldmcrider

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    1) Take the MSF Basic Rider Course.
    2) Get some good protective gear (helmet, jacket, gloves, boots and pants).
    3) Buy a cheap used bike. Ride it for a year to get some experience.
    4) If you decide you really like to ride, sell the cheap used bike and buy your dream bike. As fnfalman said you can probably get what you paid for it so you won't lose alot of $$.
     
  7. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    +1 for the last two posters.


    After spending a few years riding off-road, I tried a street bike. I was shocked to learn how little skill the average street rider has.


    Also, it's tough to lose money on a $2000 used bike.


    Here's an example of a Hondly-Davidson that would be a good prepper for your dream bike:

    http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sfv/mcy/258933244.html


    Ride it, have it fall off the kickstand in the garage, drop it in a parking lot, and then sell it for $1500. (BTW, mileage in that Shadow is a bit high, but it's only an example.)
     
  8. freakshow10mm

    freakshow10mm 10mm Advocate

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    Agreed. Training, gear, cheap bike, then buy your first "real" bike. That is the route I'm taking. I have been riding two years on an '81 GS450 ( I paid $1050 on ebay) and have learned a great deal and now know what I want for a first "real" bike ('03 Suzuki SV1K naked). If I would have bought the motorcycle I first wanted when I started getting the training, I would have been severely disappointed and pissed that I made a $7K mistake. I am glad I made the choice I did.

    Once you get some basic skills, test ride bikes at dealerships. Try all kinds. I rode some that I thought I was going to hate but actually liked them quite a bit (Shadow 750 Spirit). Some I thought would be great turned out to be not so great (V-Star). Some were awesome while moving, but slow speed maneuvers (M109R) were terrible; I just can't handle that much weight with the maneuvers I need to do at home. Some got added to my wish list as fun rides (Ninja 250) or something I might get into later (dualsports like the KLR650). That is part of the fun of motorcycles, just like firearms. Everyone has their niche and it is fun to test some out and see if one fits you.
     
  9. Scrappy

    Scrappy

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    Yes, a Harley is a Harley. It's got a great name to it.
    But Harleys are overated, over priced celeberty bikes. They have Yesterdays technology at tomorrow's prices.
    Its not even American besides being made in USA. Almost all the parts are made in china and tawain. If you dont believe me take a walk through any Harley store and pick up anything in the store. Jackets, parts whatever and it's made in tawain or china.
    Now they are cutting costs big time but still charging a big premium for there bikes!
    You can get a Jap bike better made and a lot cheaper to boot!
    if you buy a bike for resale get the - Harleytawainoson!
     
  10. Scrappy

    Scrappy

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    Have you looked at an M109R?
    http://www.frappr.com/m109riders/photos/3547775
     
  11. f3joel

    f3joel

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    hardley movin motherf#&%ers. Live To Trailer, Trailer To Live.
     
  12. Cryptoboy

    Cryptoboy Sr. Sr. Member!

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    Better made? Not likely! (Unless you are still living in your mom's basement in the 70's). Cheaper? Yes, you have a point there. But then they are charging what people are willing to pay.

    Personally I have loved each Harley I've owned now (2 HD's, 2 Buell's). The Harleys have been exceptional as far as dependability (in fact, I haven't taken either bike to the shop for anything other then services like 1k/5k/10k). Not so with some friends of mine that ride metric cruisers.

    ddj, I agree completely with what others have said (MSF, gear, used bike, get the bike you really want after a year or so). You might find out that you don't like cruisers, and if you had bought a brand new NightTrain, trying to trade that in for something else, you're going to take a hit on it.
     
  13. Wrangler100

    Wrangler100 NRA Patron Mbr

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    I see no reason to rip on some ones elses choice of gear, whether it be a motorcycle, a pickup truck, or even a hand gun. This is what you hear from people who do not own a Harley, usually it arises from "I want one but can't afford it" types of people; can't be in the "club" so they bash eveything about it.

    I have never trailered my Harley and know many others who haven't as well, there are *****holes who ride all types of bikes, even Honda F3's... :animlol:
     
  14. Bullwinkle J Moose

    Bullwinkle J Moose Quick! Duck!

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    +1
    A lot of folks buy a first bike and then, the first time some cager almost kills them, they get rid of it. There absolutely no point in buying a $15k+ bike to learn on and determine if you have what it takes to stick with it.

    After all, THIS could happen to you.;)
     
  15. codivecop

    codivecop

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    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

    I was deciding between a BMW and a Harley when I was shopping. The BMW place didn't want to play, and the Harley had the POSE! So I got that! :supergrin: In the nearly 2 years I have had that I have been "picked on" about when my Harley was going to fall apart, but the BMW guys come up to me and tell me they have had more problems as of late... I don't know if it's just who I am talking to or a problem. I do know I love MY bike, and believe you love YOUR bike, so why pick on your "baby" and piss you off. Let's just go ride! Who knows, this year could be my bike and next year could be yours that has a mechanical problem!
     
  16. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    I have lots of problems with my BMW for the last two years. The damn shocks and tires keep wearing out on me:animlol: :banana:
     
  17. M1a65

    M1a65

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    It was good advice who ever listed picking up a used bike as a learner, 500cc or smaller preferably. Don't let the fools try to talk you into a "mans" bike before you are ready to handle one in traffic or with a passenger or you'll end up as a statistic... Most any bike you'll get these days is pretty reliable but you'll pay more for Harley or BMW's and parts for foreign bikes make Harley seem reasonable if you can believe that. To the poster who said all Harley parts/gear are made in China please put down the crack pipe. As with all products today they're will be some portion of them made over seas, there is 13 on a HD at last count. There isn't near that many Us made parts on a foriegn made bike but I digress. Just wear all your protective gear (gloves/helmet/boots) and take it easy for the first few months till you get the hang of it. Your most likely to crash in your first few months, try to keep a perfect record for not breaking any bones! Good luck!
     
  18. HollowHead

    HollowHead Firm member

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    It's most not all. The Honda Gold Wing has more USA manufactured parts than the Sportster, the highest USA-content bike of HD's current line up at 73%. Anyway, as the owner of three Harleys and one Triumph, buy what you like, not what others like. HH
     
  19. Ol' Dirty

    Ol' Dirty

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    It doesn't matter what you ride. The first thing to do is learn how to ride. That means more than learning how to make it move down the road. You need to understand how the machine works, techniques, anticipating other cars and traffic, how to corner and how to stop. It really needs to be second nature. That only comes with practice. Until you have the skills, get something used. There are lots of bikes out there that are perfect for beginners. These days most of them are pretty good looking too.

    As far as the Harley thing goes, I ride a sportster but generally despise Harley Davidson. You won't find anything on my bike with the bar and shield or a big stupid HD badge. I like old technology and the classic looks. For the most part, anyone with a little knowledge and a good set of tools can work on them.

    Anyway, learn how to ride first, then decide what you want. Once you get out in the wind it won't matter what you ride. Just ride safe and stay out of the bars.
     
  20. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    You sound like a good candidate for the XR1200 prototype, that is if a) Harley-Davidson were to make it, and b) were to sell it in the USA.

    Their PR releases talk about making the XR1200 for the European market because HD recognizes the differences and requirements of European riders versus American riders.

    That's another way of saying that they make bloated hogs for the American market and the sweet rides for the Europeans; who presumably are serious riders. The announcement is a slap in the face of the serious American riders who prefer the cruiser type, but Harley knows their market and knows their targeted demographic very well. And in the end, money talks - ********* walks.