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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had to go and ran 50-rounds of 132-gr PMC ball ammo through the Detective Special real quick to see how she does. Amazingly enough, I did a lot better on DA than SA firing. It's tough work getting these itty bitty guns on target though. Definitely not my first choice for fighting, but for CCW and last ditch defense, they ain't bad. The recoil of the PMC ball ammo was practically nil. Makes me wonder if I should buy me a Colt Cobra as well.:whistling:

The DA pull stages nicely typical of Colt but the final break was quite heavy. The very first shot got thrown way off, but once I got used to the break, I can keep the groups together a lot better. Still, I think that she needs a visit to a smithy to lighten up the DA break.





 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Rapid fire DA (last ditch defense) spreads it out a bit more but I can still keep all the shots in center mass.



 

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woo woo
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Pretty cool, you probably tried to stuff those .45acp rounds in the chamber and it didn't work, right?:supergrin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice shooting!
Actually, that's pretty poor shooting at 7-yds. I've seen people do a lot better with their snubbies, but it's my first time out and I must admit that it's a challenge to hold a gun that small and that light steady for SA work and to keep it on target for DA work.
 

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Actually, that's pretty poor shooting at 7-yds. I've seen people do a lot better with their snubbies, but it's my first time out and I must admit that it's a challenge to hold a gun that small and that light steady for SA work and to keep it on target for DA work.
One of the keys to shooting a Cobra accurately is to use the Jack Ruby stretch.

Notice the balance provided by the right foot forward, knee slightly bent.
 

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Actually, that's pretty poor shooting at 7-yds. I've seen people do a lot better with their snubbies, but it's my first time out and I must admit that it's a challenge to hold a gun that small and that light steady for SA work and to keep it on target for DA work.
They are more difficult to shoot well. But if you master this revolver and your shooting skills will improve with every gun you own. I used to think small guns were inaccurate until I saw a sergeant in the AF shoot the qualification course with a Jennings J22 for fun. He shot an expert score.
 

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Texan
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I took my snubbie out today (S&W 642) and man am I terrible at shooting that thing well. You do a lot better than I do. I love the gun and how easy it is to carry, but I really need to practice more. You have any tips for a newer revolver shooter?

Nice guns by the way.
 

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Last time I shot the 642 I did a rapid fire of 5 shots and found the skin pulled off the web of my strong hand. Just interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I took my snubbie out today (S&W 642) and man am I terrible at shooting that thing well. You do a lot better than I do. I love the gun and how easy it is to carry, but I really need to practice more. You have any tips for a newer revolver shooter?

Nice guns by the way.
Assuming that the trigger pull isn't too bad, the trick to good DA firing is pretty much like everything else: lock your wrist, have a firm grip and a nice even trigger pull. The trigger pull must be a smooth motion or otherwise you'd start spreading your shots from side to side.

Colt's DA pull is two-staged, so you can pull it in more than halfway where it comes to a slight rest, then you apply more pressure to go over the threshold (break) point to fire the gun. So, you can actually hesitate a bit, confirm your aim and then go all the way. The break weight for this gun is rather heavy and stiff and it tends to throw my shots off. I compared it with the shop's other snubbie (a Cobra) and the Cobra's break weight was a lot lighter.
 

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woo woo
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It takes a little dedication, focus on perfect sight picture and try using the Isosceles stance if you aren't. IME you will tend to eliminate side to side stuff and apply more even grip vs Weaver.
Oh, slowing down and working your way up helps too.:supergrin:
 

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Malcontent
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I took my snubbie out today (S&W 642) and man am I terrible at shooting that thing well. You do a lot better than I do. I love the gun and how easy it is to carry, but I really need to practice more. You have any tips for a newer revolver shooter?

Nice guns by the way.
Front sight, squeeze. Dry fire, lots of it. Notice how the sight moves around while you dry fire it? That's what you need to stop.

Also, don't milk the trigger. Once you start it moving, keep it moving. One smooth, steady squeeze that doesn't take all day to make it break.
 

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Front sight, squeeze. Dry fire, lots of it. Notice how the sight moves around while you dry fire it? That's what you need to stop.

Also, don't milk the trigger. Once you start it moving, keep it moving. One smooth, steady squeeze that doesn't take all day to make it break.
This man knows.

On average, I put about 100 rounds a month through my carry snub, and even practice single action head shots.
 

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So, you guys don't stage your trigger pulls with the Colt?
I don't like the idea of staging any trigger. I don't think it's a safe practice. I'm not saying you shouldn't do it. It's not like sweeping people or something like that. I just think if your moving the trigger, it should be with the intention of moving it all the way, not counting on it stopping when your finger tip touches your support hand thumb, or just by muscle control etc. This is my opinion, it's not some type of edict I'm trying to serve upon the people of the Earth.

As far as marksmanship, I'm a pretty good shot, but not the stuff legends are made of. So I can't give you lots of real good specific coaching etc. But I have chatted it up and shot with guys who were. Old school PPC shooters from when all cops carried DA wheel guns. They all told me that staging the trigger is kind of a shortcut that will only get you so far. They say to keep the trigger moving. In PPC competition, staging is even against the rules.

Since you already stage your shots, I recommend you do it without staging. Stay at it for a while. See how it goes. Your "rapid fire" groups aren't much bigger than some of your slow fire groups. None of which qualify as "bad" IMO. You basically have small round groups in all of them with a flier here and there. The fliers are almost guaranteed to be from anticipating recoil and taking your eye off the front sight at the instant the shot breaks. Dry fire really helps fix that problem.

The other limiting factor is vision. My eyes have held up so far, but if the front sight is just a giant blurr, it's going to make things harder. Wear reading glasses, and when your near vision gets bad enough, your readers are so strong you can't see anything else. My father used to wear two different lenses, one in each eye. One to see the sights, one to see everything else. But if your eyes are still good, then just lots of practice and dry fire.
 

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I have about 500 rounds through my 442, 200 of those being +p rounds. It's not bad at all, just takes some getting used too. I am using the 442 as a secondary carry and added Crimson Trace grips, they completely change the dynamics of that gun as a secondary carry piece.

I don't train with it by staging the trigger. I train the same way as I will likely have to use it. For a secondary carry piece the chances I will be staging the trigger are slim, if the need to use it arises.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't stage the trigger with the SWs, but just with the Colts because I thought that's how you would shoot the Colts and take advantage of that slight pause before the final break. I'll try it the other way and see how that works.
 

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Texan
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Thanks for the info guys, my shots seem to be pulling about 5-7 inches right at 10 yards. I definitely notice my sight moving a little in that direction during dry fire, do I just need to dry fire it a ton until this stops happening? I have a pretty hard grip on it.

Thanks
 

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Cuhootnified Roamer
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Thanks for the info guys, my shots seem to be pulling about 5-7 inches right at 10 yards. I definitely notice my sight moving a little in that direction during dry fire, do I just need to dry fire it a ton until this stops happening? I have a pretty hard grip on it.

Thanks
If you're yanking to the right and you're right hand dominant: Pay attention to the position of your finger on the trigger when you dry fire. Try to use the crease of the distal joint. Sometimes pulling "outboard" means that your finger is not into the trigger guard far enough.
 

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Texan
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If you're yanking to the right and you're right hand dominant: Pay attention to the position of your finger on the trigger when you dry fire. Try to use the crease of the distal joint. Sometimes pulling "outboard" means that your finger is not into the trigger guard far enough.
I'll definitely give this a try next time I shoot it. I have had the middle first pad of my trigger finger on the trigger.
 
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