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Wondering how many of you store your ammo in a fireproof safe? I typically only have around 2-3k rounds on hand at any given time, but I'm wondering if I should have a safe for it. Not only to protect the ammo from fire and water damage, but to not endanger any firefighters that might have to enter the home during a fire?

Thoughts?
 

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Nothing is fireproof. Fire resistant for a short period at a given temperature, but not fireproof.

I have several safes for my firearms, but ammunition isn't stored in any of them.

When rounds start cooking off in a structure fire, personnel back off and wait. Unless there's a need for an interior search, most of the time a structure fire is about protecting exposures; adjacent structures. Unless the fire is very small, caught early, and contained in one room, most of the time the structure is a write-off.

I don't store my powder or primers in a safe, either.
 

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I have an old refrigerator that gave up the ghost. I re-purposed it for powder, primers and loaded rounds. Also helps for temperature extremes.

Yes. Fireman's bunker gear is sufficient protection from cooked off rounds.
Not protection for loaded guns stored in the house during a fire.

My safe is relatively fire resistant - it has 6" concrete walls/ceiling/floor. :supergrin:

wp
 

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Just so everyone knows, cartidges are not a major concern in a fire. The rounds cook off pretty harmlessly.
I've been in structure fires when rounds began cooking off. We backed off and went to exterior attack and exposures only.

Yes. Fireman's bunker gear is sufficient protection from cooked off rounds.
Not protection for loaded guns stored in the house during a fire.
I wouldn't put that to the test. Turnouts are some measure of thermal protection, but that's about it. I've had nails through my Ranger turnout boots, and heavy leather gloves ripped on windows, resulting in cut hands. The gear does get snagged and cut. It's primarily there for temporary thermal protection. I certainly wouldn't want to be in a room when ammunition starts popping, for two reasons. I don't want to be in the room when it's that hot or the ammunition is that hot, and I don't want to be there when any hazardous material begans burning or reacting, definitely to include ammunition, powder, and primers.
 

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http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2012/11/how-ammunition-reacts-in-a-fire-saami-video-report/

From the article:

"At distances of 10 meters, bullets launched from “cooked-off” ammo would not penetrate the normal “turn-out gear” worn by fire-fighters."

Hard to find a house in WV that didn't have ammo in it. If we knew where it was, we would try to maneuver around it, but it would not stop us.

I was at a fire in Belpre, OH that melted my firetruck; not worried about a few rounds of ammo.:supergrin:

wp
 

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http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2012/11/how-ammunition-reacts-in-a-fire-saami-video-report/

From the article:

"At distances of 10 meters, bullets launched from “cooked-off” ammo would not penetrate the normal “turn-out gear” worn by fire-fighters."

Hard to find a house in WV that didn't have ammo in it. If we knew where it was, we would try to maneuver around it, but it would not stop us.

I was at a fire in Belpre, OH that melted my firetruck; not worried about a few rounds of ammo.:supergrin:

wp
I've been in structure fires in turnout gear, and seldom in a room that put me 10 meters or more from anything. I've been in fires that melted and crazed SCBA masks, burned off the nomex hood around the mask, melted boots, and softened and burned helmets, as well as made air in the tank uncomfortable to breathe. There are plenty of hazards in a fire, but I've yet to hear of a case in which rounds were cooking off and personnel were directed to enter that area to fight the fire.

I've also been on a number of fires that have been started by shooting, or by exploding targets.
 

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Just because protocol is to stay back, that doesn't mean the rounds are dangerous. It just means the people in charge think they are.
The testing was done at 10 yards, but the results would have been the same at 1 yard. Without a chamber to contain the pressure, the bullet never achieves dangerous velocity.
 
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