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Finally....1st Flight Lesson!

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Epeescott, Feb 8, 2004.

  1. Epeescott

    Epeescott Senior Deacon

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    Well, I had my first actual flight lesson today...and I was well prepared by studying my flight manuals well.

    I did the taxi, takeoff, and then entered the traffic pattern and landed...all with the instructor's coaching of course. I was aiming for the 1,000 foot marker as my touchdown point, and was probably 200 feet short of it.

    I must say, I am very surprised at how difficult it was maintaining the plane...I could not maintain an attitude constant enough to keep airspeed steady....sheesh! The nose was all over the place.

    Well, practice makes perfect, hopefully.....I will need it!

    How many hours did it take all of you to get your private pilot license?
     
  2. 40Cal

    40Cal Modurbator

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    Congrats on taking the first step!

    You'll be amazed at how quickly you get comfortable controlling the aircraft. Before you know it, it will be second nature. You'll be able to anticipate attitude changes by feel.

    I think I had about 50 hours when I got my private. It really depends on how often you fly. If you only fly once a week or less, it will take longer than if you fly 3 times a week.

    Good luck!
     

  3. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Congradulations:)
    The fun has just begun.

    I think I had something over a hundred hours.
    It was almost kind of an after thought.

    I started flying in 1960.
    Back then once you got signed off for cross country, at about 20 hours, you really didn't have to fly with an instructor again, if you didn't want to.
    With a few exceptions, on a Student ticket, you could do anything a Private Pilot could do, except carry passengers.
    A student could even fly into international airports solo.

    I bought an Aeronca Chief with a couple friends and wasn't in any hurry to get a Private.
     
  4. sopdan

    sopdan

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    I remember on my second lesson (in June, so long ago) when we landed I asked my instructor how much he was on the controls and he replied "that was all you," and I was just like "oh. ;g " It's definitely different when you start to realize that you are in control of everything.

    I had about 50 hours when I got my PPL, and that was flying a couple days a week, weather permitting.
     
  5. flybywire

    flybywire

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    Congratulations on a good start.

    I just looked at my #1 logbook for the first time in a long time. I got my private ticket on 1-15-72. When I finished the checkride, I had 36.2 hrs.

    A lot more training requirements have been added to the PTS since then.
     
  6. Hank Bodmer

    Hank Bodmer

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    Trim, trim, and more trim!;)
     
  7. Epeescott

    Epeescott Senior Deacon

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    Well, I am not too focused on how quickly I get it done, but more on how knowledgeable I will be. However, it definitely costs less if I do it sooner.
     
  8. flybywire

    flybywire

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    As a former (current, but not active) flight instructor, I advise folks who are contempletating taking flight lessons of 2 things:

    1. Make sure you have TIME to go start to finish allowing at least 3 flying sessions per week, and additional time for study/preparation.

    2. Make sure you fence off enuf MONEY to go start to finish without interruption. You don't want to have to be waiting for more $$ to take your next lesson.

    If you don't have both of these in sufficient quantity, you will have delays. Delays mean discontinuities, which will cost you more time and $$ in the long run.

    Additional TIP: It is very helpful to have your written exam passed before you even begin flying. I know there are tradeoffs here. Some will advocate studying for the written while you're flying, as the written material will make more sense. It has been my experience, that studying concurrently for the written exam tends to bog down the flying portion. Passing the written first is a clear indicator of commitment, and makes the flying portion a lot more fun.

    Good luck.