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Coulda' shoulda' woulda' is of no help at all here.

OP, only through familiarization will you become comfortable with your firearms, Glock or otherwise.

I suggest that you spend a good couple of hours at the range each week, where you can shoot, field strip, reassemble and lather, rinse, repeat the process with your Glock as many times as you want in an environment that was designed for shooting.

Before too long you'll become confident enough through these repeated actions that the act of racking the slide and pulling the trigger prior to field stripping becomes second nature that you hardly think about, whether you're in your bedroom or a neighbor's garage.

It's also not uncommon to drop the mag and rack the slide numerous times in addition to physically eyeballing the chamber to be sure it's clear, to afford yourself a little extra degree of safety.

:D
 

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I commend the OP for new gun caution. I hear many reports of those even well experienced, having unintended accidents. It CAN happen. Those who have never made a mistake can count themselves lucky only so far.

Think of it in simple terms:

Always undo belt, then drop drawers, then sit over hole, before pooping...

Any gun:
Always drop mag, rack rack rack, look in hole, before manipulation.
 
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I'm a new gun owner, my family has always had guns around and I've gone to the range here and there growing up but I'd never say I "grew up around guns". I purchased my first pistol for home defense and was told I should learn how to break it down and clean it. Come to find out that you have to dry fire to release the slide. Call me gun shy but I live in an apartment complex so even though I'm sure the pistol is unloaded (visual and manual inspection) I'm terrified to dry fire! I live in the city so going out to the woods to get comfortable dry firing isn't a valid option...does anyone else hate this design? I love the pistol but I can't seem to get over this hump.

Thanks in advance!
Buy a Smith & Wesson Shield. They have a little tab you can move to field strip the gun without having to dry fire it. I have one and I tried it both ways. Dry firing is no big deal though.
 

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Its all been said here!
Get in the SAME routine, and i mean SAME. Of unloading a weapon everytime.
I remove the mag.on any weapon that has one then lock the slide or open the bolt. On a hand weapon i tip the top the side when i open the slide which leaves the chambered round in the hand that opened the slide.
Same way every time
REMOVE MAG FIRST.
Dry firing? Some may disagree,some insists on caps( there always a good idea) but dry firing will teach you your weapons trigger pull, you will KNOW when it fires, and if your doing it right, your sight picture WILL STAY THE SAME. Its a learning tool even for the best shooters.
AND YES! As far as ANY weapon goes ITS ALWAYS LOADED.
Being scared of a weapon can be as dangerous as not respecting it.
Working with a professional is always a good idea with a new gun owner!
Be safe,enjoy!
 

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I think that the OP's paranoia of having to pull the trigger in order to disassemble the Glock for field stripping have been created by nearly all the video blogs and the gun writers of the numerous gun rags that disparage Glocks need to dry fire the weapon for disassembly. Often indicating that Glock should redesign their fire control group to remedy this unsafe practice. One even noted that this was one of the decisions by our armed forces of not having chosen the Glock.
A recent blog and gun magazine article reviewing a non Glock pistol have in CAPITOL letters have noted that this is unnecessary and safer than well known pistols [meaning Glock] that is one of the safest, most prolific guns in the world.
They then instruct the need to remove magazine and lock slide to the rear and visually and physically verify that the chamber is empty.
They proceed with the field strip and reassembly. Then rack the slide and dry fire numerous times to insure proper function.
What is the difference if the same safety checks are done to to any pistol?
Glock Haters have to find some fault and this seems to be the most damning they can find with no other fault with the pistol other than it feeling like a 2x4 in their subjective hands.
 

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Went there, did that, wrote about it.
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Just work three racks of the slide into your MOA. Rack, rack, rack, click. This will answer any doubts you may have. Strip as before.

By the way, there's nothing wrong with being overly cautious. Countless NDs could be avoided with your mindset.


Die hiding or die fighting.
---Douglas Gordon
 

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OPs concern as a new firearms owner is valid. People have been shot and killed from dry firing/ND. In addition to the firearm safe handling procedures, don't be a careless moron is very important.
 

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Drop mag. Rack. Look. Stick your finger in the chamber/barrel. Drop the slide. Pull the trigger. There is nothing but sacking up and doing it. I am also OCD on dry firing and do not like it. But you just learn to do it.

If not, move to another platform.
Drop mag. Rack. Look. Stick your finger in the chamber/barrel. Drop the slide. Pull the trigger. There is nothing but sacking up and doing it. I am also OCD on dry firing and do not like it. But you just learn to do it.

If not, move to another platform.
Yeah, sticking my finger in the chamber, for some reason, solidifies in my mind that the chamber is empty. Don't know why, but it helps.
 

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Drop the magazine, rack the slide and lock it open. Look in
there. Is there any way that the gun could be loaded without
you knowing it?
Zeke
 

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I'm a new gun owner, my family has always had guns around and I've gone to the range here and there growing up but I'd never say I "grew up around guns". I purchased my first pistol for home defense and was told I should learn how to break it down and clean it. Come to find out that you have to dry fire to release the slide. Call me gun shy but I live in an apartment complex so even though I'm sure the pistol is unloaded (visual and manual inspection) I'm terrified to dry fire! I live in the city so going out to the woods to get comfortable dry firing isn't a valid option...does anyone else hate this design? I love the pistol but I can't seem to get over this hump.

Thanks in advance!
Plenty of great pistols out there that don't require this step.
 

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All the classes I have gone to, whenever you are checking a pistol to see if it is empty you:
Drop magazine
Rack slide one or more times
lock slide to rear
visually inspect chamber
physically inspect chamber (pinky finger usually)

At this point you can proceed to release slide on empty chamber, pull trigger (while still facing in a safe direction) and disassemble.

Once firearm is assembled you will once again have to dry fire the firearm to verify that it was reassembled correctly and properly functions.

Dowel rod as a physical check tool sounds like a decent idea if you're wary of sticking your finger into an open slide (it really sucks when the slide release gets pressed with a finger in the chamber)

Making sure there is no ammunition in the same room as you are doing the dry fire is a good idea as well.

As was stated right from the very beginning and echoed several times, a 5 gallon bucket with sand WILL stop a bullet.
Go to home depot, buy a 5 gallon bucket (and lid also if you want)
Purchase a bag of play sand, or any other sand.
Fill bucket with sand to at least half full (8-10 inches)
(if you bought a lid cut or drill a 2" hole in center of lid)
final cost is $10-15. Peace of mind is worth a whole heck of a lot more than that.
 
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Whats the point of cutting a hole in the sand bucket. Just put the lid on and pull the trigger. If the gun fires you will have a visible record of your stupidity, less mess and you can keep count.
 

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Whats the point of cutting a hole in the sand bucket. Just put the lid on and pull the trigger. If the gun fires you will have a visible record of your stupidity, less mess and you can keep count.
It's easier to keep the muzzle centered on the bucket, and if you have the muzzle inside the hole it can help (albeit only a little) to contain some of the blast. Mostly just to make sure you are properly centered on it.

I suppose the benefits to counter your argument directly are that there will be no visual record of what happened, nobody can keep score, and if the hole isn't much larger than the muzzle end of your pistol there shouldn't be much mess anyway.

On a side note, does it make any difference if the sand is wet or dry?
 
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