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I'm a new gun owner, my family has always had guns around and I've gone to the range here and there growing up but I'd never say I "grew up around guns". I purchased my first pistol for home defense and was told I should learn how to break it down and clean it. Come to find out that you have to dry fire to release the slide. Call me gun shy but I live in an apartment complex so even though I'm sure the pistol is unloaded (visual and manual inspection) I'm terrified to dry fire! I live in the city so going out to the woods to get comfortable dry firing isn't a valid option...does anyone else hate this design? I love the pistol but I can't seem to get over this hump.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Spend some time at home with the pistol unloaded. Snap cap dummy rounds to get used to how the mechanics work.

To help with the unease, you can get a 5 gallon bucket of sand to point your gun at. 6 inches of sand stops most conventional pistols. You can buy cheap IIIA armor squares off eBay or amazon too if you want to point at something that will stop the bullet too.

Of course, when you get comfortable clearing your firearm, it won’t be necessary. But in the meantime, cheap peace of mind.
 

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I'm a new gun owner, my family has always had guns around and I've gone to the range here and there growing up but I'd never say I "grew up around guns". I purchased my first pistol for home defense and was told I should learn how to break it down and clean it. Come to find out that you have to dry fire to release the slide. Call me gun shy but I live in an apartment complex so even though I'm sure the pistol is unloaded (visual and manual inspection) I'm terrified to dry fire! I live in the city so going out to the woods to get comfortable dry firing isn't a valid option...does anyone else hate this design? I love the pistol but I can't seem to get over this hump.

Thanks in advance!
I know in your case this is an honest question to an honest issue you have with your Glock.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of people who register on the site, just so they can post some trolling remark about something that has been discussed for decades regarding the Glock design. I know you are an exception, but I just wanted to point that out in case you get some skeptical responses to your thread.

My advice is your problem has absolutely nothing to do with your Glock and has everything to do with your state of mind with regard to handguns (or maybe guns of any type).

The only sane way to deal with this issue is to seek professional training. Guns are VERY dangerous things to have if you are not extremely proficient and confident. Professional training is your solution.
 

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though I'm sure the pistol is unloaded (visual and manual inspection) I'm terrified to dry fire! I live in the city so going out to the woods to get comfortable dry firing isn't a valid option...does anyone else hate this design? I love the pistol but I can't seem to get over this hump.

Thanks in advance!
and the difference between a Glock and any other semi-auto unloaded pistol is??? Empty is empty, what do you think is going to happen?
 

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I joined this forum to give you another option. It is possible to remove the slide without dry firing. What you need to do is lock the slide to the rear, remove the plate on the rear of the slide, and remove the striker. Now the slide can be removed without pulling the bang switch.
 

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I commend you for trying to be safe and recognizing a potential issue for you. Seems like you are trying to follow the "4 rules of gun safety"...
  1. All guns are always loaded. (Treat them so!)
  2. Never point the gun at anything you are not willing to destroy.
  3. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on target (and you have made the decision to shoot).
  4. Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.
These rules are designed to avert tragedy even if one rule is broken... however, in your case, #4 is your big issue... By getting a clearing bucket (sand bucket), this would allow you to be sure the round would be stopped if you failed to clear the firearm properly. You would also be following the other rules, as you would be on your target, and intentionally pointing at the bucket.
 

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Concur with WeeWilly. What you have described inidicates (to me at least) an insecurity with the firearm, WHICH IS OK since you are early on the learning curve. You are also about to enter a very dangerous phase, where you get over your apprehension but perhaps without gaining the experience to keep yourself safe.

The fact that you asked the question also shows that you aren't too proud or stubborn to seek help. That's a good trait for a student. Highly recommend seeking some training from an experienced trainer, not just an experienced shooter.
 

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I joined this forum to give you another option. It is possible to remove the slide without dry firing. What you need to do is lock the slide to the rear, remove the plate on the rear of the slide, and remove the striker. Now the slide can be removed without pulling the bang switch.
I know in your case this is an honest attempt at helping the OP.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of people who register on the site, just so they can post some trolling remark about something that has been discussed for decades regarding the Glock design. I know you are an exception, but I just wanted to point that out in case you get some skeptical responses to your post. Some might even suggest you and the OP are the same person, just so your are prepared for such unfounded accusations.

While your observation has merit as it pertains to being able to field strip a Glock without pulling the trigger, its applicability to the OP's "problem", IMO, could only be called monstrously bad advice.

Your "procedure" can be helpful when fooling with trigger bits and the user gets themselves in a place where the trigger won't actuate and also when the user doesn't have an armorers plate installed on the slide which would allow them to trip the trigger from behind, but to use it do avoid pulling the trigger on an otherwise clear and functioning Glock is laughable.

Welcome to GT, not the best of starts IMO, but I suspect with your technical acumen they will only get better. :)
 

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I'll probably take some heat for this, but for all of you telling the OP to get over it, when you dry fire, do you point the firearm at your children's bedroom? Why not, it's unloaded, right?

It sounds like the OP lives in an apartment building and has neighbors above, below, and on the sides... no safe direction to point when dry firing, even after clearing. Every negligent discharge I have heard about that didn't involve holstering was from an "unloaded" gun.
 

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I cannot recall ever having an issue with dropping the hammer on an "empty" chamber. That is probably the result of 2 things: before I do it I know, via multiple checks, that there is no live round in the chamber and for 40+ years a primary component of my training regimen with each of my carry handguns (especially) has involved dry firing.

My real concern/worry has always been focused on loading the "ready round" into the chamber of semi-autos. For that reason, for many years I have kept 2 of the sand buckets (with lids), one each in my bedroom closet and in the basement beside one of my gunsafes.

I suppose that if I did suffer some anxiety over having the dry fire my Glocks prior to disassembly, aiming them at a sand bucket might be an excellent solution. :)
 

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I was just trying to give the OP an option for disassembly until he become comfortable with the firearm. I actually roll dry fire practice into cleaning. I’ll dry fire a few times before I disassemble,clean and lubricate.
 

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Just fyi, many people (myself included) dryfire pistols other than Glocks after field stripping, cleaning and reassembly. Some, only after a detail strip.

Regardless, after removing the magazine and locking the slide to the rear, you can clearly see (and also feel with a finger) that the firearm has no mag in the mag well and no round in the chamber.

Make it a habit to check twice - no magazine in the magwell and no cartridge in the chamber. Use a clearing barrel if it makes you more comfortable.
 

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Good to hear serious comments/questions about safety. Check and double check the chamber anytime you are going to clean and/or disassemble the weapon. That being said there isn’t a way around dry firing the weapon for disassembly. It’s just the design.

However, as stated above dry firing is a GREAT way to improve your hold, trigger control and posture. It’s widely used by most ( if not all ) shooting instructors including the military. ( I didn’t think we’d ever stop dry firing in th Corps LOL )

I still dry fire at the tv while watching tv sometimes.
 
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