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fiber optic internet service at home

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Washington D.C., Feb 2, 2005.

  1. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Today I received a letter from the local telephone company that they now offer fiber optic internet service.I now have 750kb/sec max DSL.The fiber optic is 5mb/sec max for $5 more a month.15mb/sec max for $15 more a month and a very expensive 30mb/sec max service.Does anybody have fiber optic internet service at home?How do you like it?Is it reliable?I have been happy with DSL but I might go for fiber optic service for an extra $5 and a faster connection than I have now.
     
  2. greenlead

    greenlead

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    our city is going to wired soon for fiber.
     

  3. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    I heard about it at apartments/condos in California a couple of years ago.I guess it's fairly new most places for home use.It's $5 cheaper than 1.5mb/sec DSL here.
     
  4. 0100010

    0100010 Millennium Member

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    "The local telephone company" you speak of is in the process of laying FTTP (fiber to the premises) in a lot of cities all over the country.

    The 2 speeds you are talking about are the 5Mb down / 2Mb up and 15Mb down / 2Mb up for $34.95 and $39.95. You can also pay for 30Mb down / 5Mb up if you wanted, but its more expensive. We could also offer MUCH higher speeds but won't until we perceive a demand for it.

    My opinion is biased, but it is more reliable and the speeds are incredible. The first location we rolled FTTP out is here in DFW, everyone who has it absolutely loves it.

    You can get up to 4 fully independent phone lines, internet service and very soon video service also (pay per view, analog/digital cable, video on demand, DVR) - all on that single strand of fiber and all on the same bill.

    Go for it - you won't be dissapointed.
     
  5. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Infact I think I did hear about it being in Dallas or somewhere in Texas not long ago.
     
  6. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    The price here in D.C. is $34.95 and $44.95 I think.
     
  7. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    0100010, please feel free to lay it to my home tonight. I'll take the 5Mb/2Mb. ;a

    Consider that a vote in your public demand poll. ;f
     
  8. Stephen

    Stephen Hola! Millennium Member

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    Where are they doing this? What's the 2005 roll-out schedule? Web site with more information? Can you either post or PM me with the details?

    I am quite interested in this (and I'm in Dallas)!
     
  9. 0100010

    0100010 Millennium Member

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    Nope - its not publicly posted anywhere. All I can say is in DFW it is rolling out in Lewisville, Grapevine and Plano, the original plant was in Keller. If you see a bunch of Verizon trucks in your area digging or running lines, you'll know FTTP will be available in your area soon. They get an entire neighborhood wired to the curb first, then let the residents know that they can order it. From the time your order is placed, we can have you up and running in about 5 days total, that last peice of fiber from the curb to your house run about 2 days after the order.

    You can check here to see if its available for you yet : http://www22.verizon.com/ForyourHome/Fios/fioshome.asp
     
  10. Stephen

    Stephen Hola! Millennium Member

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    Thanks for the information. I am in NE Dallas (Lake Highlands) and it's not here... I entered my information to let me know when it heads my direction.

    Thanks again.
     
  11. 0100010

    0100010 Millennium Member

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    I'm waiting to see where in the area thay are going to roll it out myself - the only norification we get is internal company news announcements. Within the last week or so they announced about 30 cities in MA, PA, NY, RI, IN. DC was announced first of the year along with cities in CA, VA and FL. I do know we have already passed a million homes and we are adding subscribers at an amazing rate.
     
  12. SamBuca

    SamBuca

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    I'm living in a Sprint-only area...and Sprint is AWFUL :(
     
  13. MikeG22

    MikeG22 CLM

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    I'd jump on that 30mb's of goodness. Our cable internet here is 5mbit down though which is still pretty nice.

    They ran fibre all over my buddy's neighborhood and up to his house a few years ago. Then I guess they ran out of money and now the whole place is blanketed in dark fibre. Too bad for him.
     
  14. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Not to hijack a thread, but since we are talking about new forms of High speed access, anyone heard of this?

    http://www.indystar.com/articles/9/218914-5659-105.html


    BPL is all the rage in rural Internet
    Popularity of high-speed effort like one in Martinsville area echoed nationwide

    By Norm Heikens
    norm.heikens@indystar.com
    February 1, 2005


    MARTINSVILLE, Ind. -- Difficult though it was, Fred and Robin Livesay ran three businesses from their home just outside town with a pokey dial-up link to the Internet.

    Now they have a new Internet service that sends information over electrical lines, and they wonder how they lived without it.

    In November, the retirees' electric utility, South Central Indiana REMC in Martinsville, made their home a test site for "broadband-over-powerline." The service sends and receives signals over the same wire carrying their electricity -- and is being tried at dozens of sites across the country.

    Plug a computer into a special Internet modem that in turn plugs into a wall socket, and they're connected.

    "We were kind of skeptical," Fred Livesay said. "I mean, how are you going to put it on electrical lines?"

    But, he added, "it has made life much better."

    Electric utilities are joining long-distance telephone carriers and cable television companies in a rush to expand high-speed Internet service.

    But many rural areas have been left out. That hampers people wanting to work from home, students doing homework online and businesses needing to communicate with customers and suppliers.

    New technology has enabled more than 40 field trials of broadband-over-powerline across the country, said Sam Spencer, editor of BPL Today, the online newsletter covering the industry. Manassas, Va., is furthest along, having offered it commercially for about a year, Spencer said.

    Cinergy's experiment is thought to be the largest.

    Launched as a pilot in May, Cinergy, based in Cincinnati, had outfitted more than 40,000 homes there with the equipment by the end of last year, though spokeswoman Kathy Meinke wouldn't say how many had subscribed to the Internet service.

    However, she said half of those subscribers had switched from cable or DSL.

    Cinergy hopes to expand the service into Indiana this year, but isn't certain when, Meinke said.

    Cinergy serves 62 Central and southern Indiana counties, but not Marion County.

    South Central REMC and Cinergy aren't the only utilities with Indiana connections tinkering with the technology.

    Lebanon Utilities plans to introduce the service by mid- summer in the Boone County community and compete with similar services offered by telephone and cable firms.

    Information Technology Manager Randy Parsons said Lebanon Utilities hopes to enlist subscribers at a quarter of the 7,500 locations it serves.

    South Central found in a survey that virtually none of its customers in a proposed pilot area close to Martinsville had access to high-speed Internet, so Chief Executive Kevin Sump launched the pilot project in November in the hope of offering the service even to its far-flung customers in Brown County.

    "We're confident that if the pilot works, we can do it throughout the whole system," Sump said.

    Speed's the thing

    Broadband-over-powerline travels in shortwave frequencies similar to those used by amateur radio operators.

    Users plug computers into modems the size of small books that in turn plug into electric outlets. Regenerator boxes hooked to the powerline every half-mile filter out static and boosts the signal.

    Most operate at up to 500 kilobits per second -- 10 to 20 times faster than dial-up, similar to DSL and slower than cable. However, new technology could match cable speeds.

    Speed and convenience translate to more desirable homes, said Martinsville real estate broker Wayne Ready.

    Market value

    A home with high-speed Internet access sells for about $1,000 more and is on the market two to three months less than a comparable house without the access, Ready said.

    "If there's not a way they can get that service in the particular neighborhood, they'll shy away from that house," Ready said.

    The Livesays used to find other things to do while waiting on their slow Internet connection.

    Fred Livesay steered drug development at Eli Lilly and Co., and Robin held executive positions at the University of Indianapolis before they retired and started their companies, each with a Web site.

    Robin operates a training and employee development consulting firm, and Fred Livesay breeds Charlois cattle with an Ohio relative.

    They recently started Timberlight Manufacturing Co., which makes solar-powered flickering memorial candles for cemeteries.

    Call Star reporter Norm Heikens at (317) 444-6532.
     
  15. 0100010

    0100010 Millennium Member

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    Yeah, there was a company in Dallas called MediaFusion that was working on a masar(maser?) to create an RF signal over the powergrid to transmit data. I know they were running trials of it somewhere with NASA, and they were able to provide about 2.4Gbs/sec of total bandwidth, but I haven't heard anything about them in a couple years.

    Plus there is the wide area "WiFi" that some cities are looking at deploying.

    Personally, I think fiber is the way to go. Fast, secure and easily upgraded. Once you've got the fiber laid it will support advances in technology for years to come. As it stands now, there's billions of miles of fiber in the ground already, what Verizon is doing is allowing the end users to link up to that fiber network directly. Fiber from the house to the central office, fiber throughout the central office and then fiber directly to the SONET backbones. Fiber for the video service that Verizon is setting up now. The only dated part of the network is the link in the central office from fiber to copper for the voice lines.

    FCC released FTTP guidelines at the end of 2002, and all the Bells have them and evaluated them. Cable providers have even looked into replacing the major lines in there systems with fiber and decided it was too expensive. SBC is still eval'ing FTTP, but they are currently doing fiber to the curb (then copper to the house). Verizon is the only provider that has dropped the cash to implement fiber all the way to the house.

    In a few year we should be able to do fiber all the way to the equipment, and then the equipment would be able to handle optical processing.

    Rambling on now, I do excited when thinking of the infrastructure thats being put in place and the wonder of what new things all the bandwidth will be utilized for. ;f


    EDIT : As far as reaching out to rural areas with fiber..... lets just say there isn't anyone thats too far away from a central office to not be able to get service. Forget all of that old DSL 18000' stuff. :cool:
     
  16. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    I have Verizon.They told me install takes 4 hours.Will run it from street to the house.The streets now have it I think.They put black boxes on the poles all over the city.They said something about adding some sort of jack in the house.I think it uses the existing phone line that is inside the house.
     
  17. 0100010

    0100010 Millennium Member

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    They run fiber from the drop terminal in the ground, in your case off a pole, to a new network terminator on your house that will replace your NID. The new terinator is called an ONT, Optical Network Terminator. It has one fiber input and four RJ11 outputs (phone lines), one RJ45 ethernet output (100Mb) and one coaxial output (video). They will also need a 120v plug nearby to plug in the battery back up / power supply unit.

    The RJ11 ports hook up to your existing twisted pair copper lines for your phones, they will run a CAT6e ethernet line to wherever you want the router. They will not use the coax port yet, video is still in the testing phase.
     
  18. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Thanks.That explains it better than they did on the phone but I understand them not wanting to get too technical.They are also including a wireless router at this time.
     
  19. Stephen

    Stephen Hola! Millennium Member

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    Here's a question - last year RISD (Richardson Independent School District) ran fiber-optic lines down our street (I live ~300' from an elementary school) for the school. Would this be the same/similar as you are involved with?

    All I can remember is that a company out of Michigan was doing the project digging - don't recall the name. Still have the marks on my curb/alley and a smallish hole in my yard from a water jet digging probe they used. ;R
     
  20. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Thanks.That explains it better than they did on the phone but I understand them not wanting to get too technical.They are also including a wireless router at this time.