close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Fata Verde Tonight (Green Fairy) 12-31-09

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Chad Landry, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. Chad Landry

    Chad Landry Cajunator® CLM

    Messages:
    38,164
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
    [​IMG]

    I had Absinthe when I was in Europe, but the green fairy didn't visit. Maybe tonight! :cool:
     
  2. LongGoneDays

    LongGoneDays Misanthropical

    Messages:
    9,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Location:
    Louisiana
    This some kind of tradition for drinkers like children have the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy? If a guy gets drunk and knocks his wife's teeth out, and puts them under his pillow does he awake to find a restraining order there instead?:dunno:




    :tongueout:
     

  3. john58

    john58 BHO is a LIAR!

    Messages:
    7,813
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, La
    Hey CJ, I was under the impression we couldn't have this stuff in the states. How does it taste? And more importantly can we get it here?
     
  4. Free Radical

    Free Radical Miembro Antiguo CLM

    Messages:
    9,988
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Four Corners
    What's with the utensil in the glass?
    I was curious enough to read a little about the stuff and many of the pictures that I found also have that or a similar utensil with the glass.
     
  5. Free Radical

    Free Radical Miembro Antiguo CLM

    Messages:
    9,988
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Four Corners
    It was prohibited for many years, but allowed again in 2007.
     
  6. TylerDurden

    TylerDurden Viva Hate CLM

    Messages:
    22,365
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Location:
    Ether
    Real stuff, with wormwood?
     
  7. michael88

    michael88

    Messages:
    1,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2009
    as for the taste, it is terrible. the utensil in the glass is a spoon of sorts with slots in it. you are supposed to put that over the top of the glass you are pooring into, and put a sugar cube on top. you then poor the liquor over the sugar cube to help with the taste. it doesnt help.
     
  8. michael88

    michael88

    Messages:
    1,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2009
    theyve been selling a knock off for years. i had it in 03, and will try to do my best to never have it again.
     
  9. tadbart

    tadbart duuuuude.

    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    3,689
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Location:
    geriatric paradise
    absente has no thujone, the chemical in wormwood, hence no fairy, just plain drunk. i rather enjoy the taste, though.
     
  10. Chad Landry

    Chad Landry Cajunator® CLM

    Messages:
    38,164
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Yes.


    I'm working on a pic of the back label now.
     
  11. Chad Landry

    Chad Landry Cajunator® CLM

    Messages:
    38,164
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
  12. Cali-Glock

    Cali-Glock Mountain Man

    Messages:
    6,060
    Likes Received:
    798
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2002
    Location:
    California Sierra Mnts
    EDIT: I stand corrected: Apparently now there is US Legal Absinthe with wormwood, but essentially no Thujone. (I guess trace amounts are there but so little as not to qualify as being there pursuant to US food rules.)

    Thujone is the active ingredient in wormwood, and is used as a pesticide, used as a "medicine" to kill worms in people and animals. It is a poison* which at fairly low does acts as a narcotic and "psychic stimulant"... thus seeing the "Green Fairy".

    (To be fair most medicines are poison; "the does makes the poison", the same for pesticides, many are used as both pesticides and medicine, again the dose makes the poison.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
  13. Chad Landry

    Chad Landry Cajunator® CLM

    Messages:
    38,164
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
    I don't find the taste unpleasant. This isn't my first time with Absinthe, either.

    It tastes just like a form of cough syrup that my mother gave me as a child. I think it was Vick's formula 44.

    She would sweeten it with sugar for my sister, but I never needed the sugar. I found the taste kind of pleasant.

    I've heard that Jagermeister tastes like cough syrup, too, but I've never tried the stuff.
     
  14. Nubbins

    Nubbins

    Messages:
    267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Location:
    Fairfax, VA
    Unless things have changed I think you can only get real Absinthe is to order it from overseas
    there are other sites but I have gotten it from here http://www.greenfairy.org/ with good results:drink::faint:
     
  15. Chad Landry

    Chad Landry Cajunator® CLM

    Messages:
    38,164
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Texas law doesn't allow us to mail order liquor, last time I checked.
     
  16. Free Radical

    Free Radical Miembro Antiguo CLM

    Messages:
    9,988
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Four Corners


    [​IMG]
     
  17. Glock19_11

    Glock19_11

    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2008
    Location:
    Utah
    it takes a lot more wormwood to make you "trip" than is in the bottle. If you were to drink Absinthe until you started tripping you'd have died from alcohol poising long before. its glorified jager.
     
  18. Nubbins

    Nubbins

    Messages:
    267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Location:
    Fairfax, VA
    History
    Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), the plant from which absinthe is produced, has been mentioned in all sorts of texts and literature throughout history from as far back as the Bible. (Supposedly, after the serpent was expelled from the Garden of Eden, wormwood grew in his trail out.)
    Wormwood and wormwood soaked in wine has been used all through ancient times as a 'cure' for everything from labor pains to rheumatism to bad breath. In the middle ages, it was even used to prevent flatulence in dogs and a deterrent to the plague.
    Modern absinthe was rediscovered publicly by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire in 1792. Dr. Ordinaire was a Frenchman living in Switzerland. During his trips in the Swiss Val-de-Travers mountain regions, he 'discovered' the wormwood plant and developed a drinkable recipe. The drink was once again promoted as a cure-all and immediately earned the nickname La Fee Verte.
    Absinthe has its commercial origins in 1797. For some time before, Mere Meriod had been privately creating her own version of absinthe. An entrepreneur named Major Henri Dubied bought the rights to her recipe and began marketing the bottled product in the Val-de-Travers and surrounding area. Major Dubied's daughter married a man named Henri-Louis Pernod. Mr. Pernod and the Dubied family then created a partnership company to produce, market and sell absinthe based on their own variation of the Henriod/Dubied/Pernod recipe. Thus begins the origins of the first product made by the famous Pernod label in Switzerland and France.
    Originally, Pernod's product was given to French soldiers in Algeria as a preventative medicine against fever. However, these soldiers continued to drink and popularize absinthe when they returned to France.
    By the mid to late 1800's, the reputation of absinthe was at its peak. The most famousand popular artists and writers of the day were well known to have received their inspirations while drinking absinthe. Van Gogh, Toulouse, Lautrec, Verlaine, Oscar Wilde, Picasso, and Beaudelaire increased the popularity of the drink through the works they created. As a result of these artists' international success, absinthe grew internationally popular as well.
    Unfortunately, absinthe's quick downfall started in 1905. A farmer in French speaking Switzerland, Jean Lanfrey, went on an all day drinking binge of absinthe, brandy and wine. Later in the evening, a growing and prolonged argument with his wife turned intensely tragic. Mr. Lanfrey, in his all day drunkenness, eventually shot his wife with their unborn baby, their four-year old daughter and their two-year old child sleeping in the crib. Mr. Lanfrey tried to shoot himself but failed.
    Everyone who knew Mr. Lanfrey said that this violent rampage simply did not fit Mr. Lanfrey's personality. As a result, his actions were blamed not on his occasional violent outbursts he was known for, nor for the mixture of drinking all day with wine, brandy and absinthe. Propaganda focused solely on the fact that he drank two large glasses of absinthe.
    Immediately, European communities began attributing absinthe as "the cause of bloodthristy crime." The anti-absinthe campaign was now in full force and in 1908 it was banned completely in Switzerland. By 1923, absinthe became an illegal alcohol in most countries including America, Germany, and France.
    http://www.greenfairy.org/history.php
     
  19. tadbart

    tadbart duuuuude.

    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    3,689
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Location:
    geriatric paradise

    i stand educated and corrected, Chad. my apologies. the bottle i have does not say that. perhaps i've let it sit for far too long. cheers to you, sir. remember to not cut off one of your ears on that stuff.
     
  20. Chad Landry

    Chad Landry Cajunator® CLM

    Messages:
    38,164
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
    I'm sure this is the case, here. But I do like the taste of the stuff(weird as that may seem), and I do get buzzed with a far lesser quantity of Absinthe than I do with other liquors of 50-percent-plus alcohol content.

    I tend to stop at a very pleasant buzz, though.