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Exposure question- Canon EOS 10S

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by scowan007, Aug 5, 2004.

  1. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    Hey all,
    I have an EOS 10S That I really like, but most pics seem overexposed (washed out) when using the auto settings. I used to take photography pretty seriously and was fairly decent. For the last 10 or so years most of my camera use has been for "snapshots", not "photographs" so it didn't really bother me.

    But I'd like to do some more serious work and have noticed that if I bracket my exposures, the ones at -.5 stop look best. Any other folks have probs with the exposure computing on the EOS 10S?

    ALso, the Canon AF lenses are all pretty slow, so you pretty much have to use fast film/slow shutter. I'm fairly cheap, so I'm not going to spring for faster lenses anytime soon. What are the least grainy faster films?
     
  2. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Canon EOS has a good reputation for its metering system, so just to eliminate external factors, could you shoot a roll of slides on auto and see how those come out? That would be a better indicator of the exposure metering system than shooting regular film (I am assuming, perhaps incorrectly, that you are shooting regular film) due to the intervening influence of printing labs.

    While shooting slides, you might pick various objects without much contrast against a neutral background of similar brightness and see if those come out right. If they do, perhaps an adjustment in metering technique would be sufficient.

    In the worst case, you may have to set up permament exposure compensation on your camera.

    As to the faster film without much grain, I would think that unless you make very large enlargements, most films today will produce good results up to 400 ASA (27 DIN).
     

  3. scowan007

    scowan007 memberrific!!!

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    hwyhobo,
    Thanks much! Will try. Yes I have been mainly using "supermarket quality" print film. I do recall that I used to shoot slides when I wanted quality. I have forgotten so much over the years!! Is slide film inherently better that print film? is 400 ASA slide film less grainy than print? I do seem to remember that I always got better color saturation (back in my manual camera days) with slides than prints.

    If I do decide to start shooting slide film, do labs offer the option of getting prints with slides? Proof sheets are too small and those little slide viewers are a pain.

    As far as what you said about anything up to 400 asa being ok for grainy-ness, with these slow azz lenses, I pretty have to use 400 asa for anything other than direct sunlight, and grain is always crappy. Is this just because I'm not spending the extra $$$ for above "supermarket grade" film?

    Now aren't you sorry you answered my original post? :)
     
  4. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Only insofar as you eliminate the middleman (the print lab), so you know that what you get on the slide in terms of exposure is what your camera produces. Don't worry about the graininess of the slide film, you will not be printing from it (read on).
    Outside of professional labs you will not get decent quality prints from slides, it's too difficult. I wouldn't even try. If you want prints, shoot regular negative film, but I would use slides as a troubleshooting device.
    How big are your prints? 4x6in? If so, you shouldn't really see any grain unless your film is severely underexposed or is poorly developed. For kicks, after you verify your exposure system with slides and various objects, try Kodak or Fuji print film 400 ASA and give it to a decent lab (I don't mean pro, I mean like Kodak lab).

    What is the maximum aperture of your lenses (4? 5.6? 3.5-5.6?) What lenses do you use? Do you use full-auto mode?