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Ever want to build/buy a log home

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by IndianaMatt, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. IndianaMatt

    IndianaMatt

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    I just think they are the most awesome thing. I think I'm gonna start saving now. Just love the rustic look. Anyone know anything about these? Efficient to heat/cool, durable, long-lasting?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Just love some of the interiors, too:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    Yes, I have long thought about it. So I am in on this thread.
     

  3. IndianaMatt

    IndianaMatt

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    I'm just learning about these. I mean, I've always known they existed, but I am just now learning about the different methods of construction, different layouts, and all of the companies out there that do this.

    My local Barnes & Noble even carries a few different log home magazines. As if I didn't have enough things to look at and think, "If only I could pay down those student loans..."

    But a man has to have dreams.
     
  4. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    I have also spent some time at B&N looking through the log homes stuff.

    I really dont know very much about them other than "oooo...look at the pretty pictures..."

    It would seem as though they do require some maintenance...but what doesnt?

    In the right setting, they are beautiful and set a mood that I am interested in.
     
  5. jame

    jame I don't even know....what I'm doing here....

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    We built a home about 14 years ago and considered it. The one big thing holding us back was simple housekeeping. There are a lot of surfaces for dust to settle, and we figured we would be buying Pledge by the gallon.

    They look cool, and from what I've seen, they're comfortable and durable. But keeping them looking great can be quite a task.
     
  6. ILannoyed

    ILannoyed

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    It's pretty cool and I encourage you to pursue this. Some good friends of ours in Northern WI built their own log home going so far as to peel each log with hand tools and notch each individual log themselves for fitting. It was a tremendous amount of work, but they have a gorgeous vacation home that they can be very proud of having built on their own. The only work they didn't do was the concrete for the basement, some of the structural carpentry and the really heavy lifting that required a crane.
     
  7. clint curtis

    clint curtis

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    Bass ackwards.....check into timber frame houses. With a timber frame house the structure (beams) are on the inside, covered by siding, and with log construction, the logs are exposed to the weather. Both are very beautiful inside. I think timber frame houses from the mid 1700's are the slickest style houses ever built. Check them out.
     
  8. CrookCounty

    CrookCounty Trolling Noob

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    Man I just wish I had a backyard :crying:
     
  9. IndianaMatt

    IndianaMatt

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    Now that is what I call living the dream: building your own home with your own hands. Much respect.
     
  10. glockaviator

    glockaviator

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    Log homes are beautiful and have architectural integrity. They are also expensive to build and expensive to maintain. Wood is not too bad an insulator, but it is not that good either. You need really thick logs to be well insulated (like 16" diameter). Log homes are single wall construction, so they need to be sealed up very well, which is hard to do. Also, logs shrink (and expand), crack and move around. They settle and have a myriad of really bizarre problems due to unequal settlement, logs drying out and cracking, chinking problems, mildew and other types of decay.

    I priced building a log home and it is 30% higher than a conventional home if built to modern specifications. OTOH, a log cabin built by hand from trees cut on the property can be the least expensive way to build (but its going to be a primitive cabin). So it all depends.

    I've been to Telluride and there are some fantastic log structures that really are works of art. Proof that it can be done. I was impressed.
     
  11. Lazy R

    Lazy R

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    The valley where I live is (or was) the log home manufacturing capital of the country. Many of the outfits are gone now with the housing crash. Log homes are a luxury item and they got hit really hard.

    There are many log homes around here, from small cabins to monstrous lodges, and they are beautiful and elegant. They do have their construction challenges with the single wall construction and shrinkage/settling.

    Good house logs are found as dry, dead standing timber. We have a million years' supply of that around here. However, even with the dry logs, the house logs will shrink and split all over on the interior. Those splits, which can never be avoided, are the perfect breeding ground for flies. And in a log house, you will be at war with flies, forever.

    Pretty though.
     
  12. *ASH*

    *ASH* FURBANITE

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    i built one years ago , now i rent it out . pain the *** lol but beautiful . here in nc you got carpenter bees . and carpenter bees are a log cabin night mare let me tell ya. :steamed::steamed: then ever season you coat the outside logs . most of the bottom logs on most log homes are fake , they are hollow that wher all the wiring goes thru .

    when im done renting it im gonna sell it .
     
  13. engineer151515

    engineer151515

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    . . . yes.
     
  14. drew4691

    drew4691

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    You can get them as a kit. My friend's parents did that when he was a kid... they had someone pour the foundation, then two or 3 flatbed trucks came, and unloaded everything, then everyday after work, his dad would go up and work on the house until late at night... it took him over a year, but he basically built that house by hand.

    But, the house is paid off and so did his hard work. Anyways there is upkeep on a log house, every 2 or 3 years you have to stain or treat the outside...... I think he's even lacquered the inside before...

    Also yes you will be fighting off the bees too.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  15. NorthCarolinaLiberty

    NorthCarolinaLiberty MentalDefective

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    Log homes are like glamour girls. They look good at first, but they cost a lot, have high maintenance, and eventually crack up in the end.
     
  16. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    I lived in a pre-cut, treated log home for a while (big Lincoln Logs). Not as glossy or glamorous as the "real deal", but it was still mighty fine living. I would do it again in a heartbeat. The pre-cut logs fit together pretty snugly for the most part (making it a lot more convenient than sealing regular log construction), and it was warm in winter and cool in summer with very little supplementary climate control. Having lived in it makes me pine* for the real deal.

    Ah, the mountain paradise. I miss it.



    * (HA! Pine! I kill me!)
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  17. Caver 60

    Caver 60

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    I literally build our home (first and only home I will ever build) in 86. We dreamed about log homes for years. Looked at several and came to the same conclusions as this guy. Especially the part about really thick logs to have any insulation value, and the shrinking and cracking part. I've sat inside log homes and seen daylight through the walls.

    We also investigated dug in, buried, earth shelter, or what ever you want to call it, homes. Visited several including one a friend build.

    Also looked at an all styrofoam one.

    Decided against all of these types of homes.

    The only concession we made was a full basement dug in about 6 1/2 feet with standard framing for the rest of the one and one half story house. I 2x6 studded the walls, stick built the roof, and insulated the heck out of it very carefully as I built it. Including water lines with the well pressure tank in the basement. The only thing I hired done was the excavating, HVAC work, and the brick work. I plumbed it, wired it, roofed it, insulated it, etc, all with the help of my two teen aged sons.

    Never had a frozen pipe, or even one drop of water in the basement. We're extremely pleased with our home. Will stay here until we die or health forces us to leave.
     
  18. G33

    G33 Frisky! CLM Millennium Member

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    Check on D-log as an alternative.
    : )


    Outdoor Hub mobile.
     
  19. stevelyn

    stevelyn NRA Life Member

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    I thought about it for a long time. They are very energy efficient for northern climes. But they are a PITA when it comes to maintenance and insurance.
    Since I've decided on where I'm going to build which is in an area prone to summer wildfires, I've abandoned the idea and I'm going with a barn shaped house with metal roof and Hardie Board siding.
     
  20. schild

    schild

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    Long ago I was going to buy a barn built in the 1840-50's, the barn had beautiful hand-hewn beams. I was going to disassemble the barn, move it to my property, and build a barn house.